germ vs seed what difference

what is difference between germ and seed

English

Etymology

From Middle French germe, from Latin germen (bud, seed, embryo). Doublet of germen.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /d͡ʒɜːm/
  • (General American) enPR: jûrm, IPA(key): /d͡ʒɝm/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)m

Noun

germ (plural germs)

  1. (biology) The small mass of cells from which a new organism develops; a seed, bud or spore.
  2. A pathogenic microorganism.
  3. The embryo of a seed, especially of a seed used as a cereal or grain. See Wikipedia article on cereal germ.
  4. (figuratively) The origin of an idea or project.
    the germ of civil liberty
  5. (mathematics) An equivalence class that includes a specified function defined in an open neighborhood.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

germ (third-person singular simple present germs, present participle germing, simple past and past participle germed)

  1. To germinate.
    • 1909, Thomas Hardy, The Flirt’s Tragedy
      Thus tempted, the lust to avenge me / Germed inly and grew.
  2. (slang) To grow, as if parasitic.
    • 2011, Black Eyed Peas, Just Can’t Get Enough
      I’m addicted, want to germ inside your love

See also

  • bacteria
  • microbe
  • parasite
  • virus

Further reading

  • germ in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • germ in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

From Proto-Iranian *garmáh, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *gʰarmás, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰor-mó-s. Cognate with Persian گرم(garm) and English warm.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛɾm

Adjective

germ (comparative germtir, superlative germtirîn)

  1. warm

Derived terms

  • germahî

Zazaki

Etymology

From Proto-Iranian *garmáh, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *gʰarmás, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰor-mó-s. Cognate with Persian گرم(garm) and English warm.

Adjective

germ

  1. warm

Derived terms

  • germey
  • germin
  • germın


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) enPR: sēd, IPA(key): /siːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd
  • Homophones: cede, sede

Etymology 1

From Middle English seed, sede, side, from Old English sēd, sǣd (seed, that which is sown), from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz (seed), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁tis (corresponding to Proto-Germanic *sēaną (to sow) + *-þiz), from *seh₁- (to sow, throw). Cognate with West Frisian sied (seed), Dutch zaad (seed), Low German Saad (seed), German Saat (sowing; seed), Icelandic sæði (seed), Danish sæd (seed), Swedish säd (seed), Latin satio (seeding, time of sowing, season). More at sow.

Alternative forms

  • sede (obsolete)

Noun

seed (countable and uncountable, plural seeds)

  1. (countable, botany) A fertilized and ripened ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  2. (countable) Any small seed-like fruit.
  3. (countable, agriculture) Any propagative portion of a plant which may be sown, such as true seeds, seed-like fruits, tubers, or bulbs.
  4. (uncountable, collective) An amount of seeds that cannot be readily counted.
  5. (countable) A fragment of coral.
  6. (uncountable) Semen.
    • 1611, King James Version, Leviticus 15:16:
      And if any man’s seed of copulation go out from him, then he shall wash all his flesh in water, and be unclean until the even.
  7. (countable, figuratively) A precursor.
    Synonym: germ
  8. (countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
    1. The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
      The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
    2. The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
      The rookie was a surprising top seed.
    3. Initialization state of a pseudorandom number generator (PRNG). (seed number)
      If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
    4. Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
      The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
  9. (now rare) Offspring, descendants, progeny.
    the seed of Abraham
  10. Race; generation; birth.
    • a. 1687, Edmund Waller, To Zelinda
      Of mortal seed they were not held.
  11. A small bubble formed in imperfectly fused glass.
Usage notes
1-3

The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

Hyponyms
  • crack seed
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

seed (third-person singular simple present seeds, present participle seeding, simple past and past participle seeded)

  1. (transitive) To plant or sow an area with seeds.
  2. (transitive) To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
  3. (transitive) To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.
  4. (sports, gaming) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  5. (Internet, transitive) To leave (files) available for others to download through peer-to-peer file sharing protocols (e.g. BitTorrent).
  6. (intransitive) To be qualified to compete, especially in a quarter-final, semi-final, or final.
  7. (intransitive) To produce seed.
  8. (intransitive) To grow to maturity.
  9. (slang, vulgar) To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
Derived terms
  • overseed
  • self-seed
Translations

Etymology 2

see +‎ -d (past tense suffix; variant of -ed).

Verb

seed

  1. (dialectal) simple past tense and past participle of see

Anagrams

  • EDES, dees, dese, sede

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English sǣd, sēd, from Proto-West Germanic *sād, *sādi, from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz, *sēdą, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (compare sowen).

Alternative forms

  • ceed, ceede, sed, sede, sedde, seede, seide, seod, seth, seyd, seyde, side, syd, zed
  • (early) sad, sæd, sæt

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seːd/, /sɛːd/

Noun

seed (plural sedes)

  1. seed (ovule or analogous structure):
    1. A kind or variety of seed.
    2. (collectively) seed, grain
  2. (figuratively) germ, origin
  3. semen, sperm (or the supposed female equivalent)
  4. offspring, progeny
  5. descendants, lineage
  6. (rare) bit, granule
  7. (rare) seeding, sowing
Derived terms
  • seden
Descendants
  • English: seed
  • Scots: seed, seid, sid
  • Yola: zeade
References
  • “sẹ̄d, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Noun

seed

  1. Alternative form of seden (to seed)

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