germ vs source what difference

what is difference between germ and source

English

Etymology

From Middle French germe, from Latin germen (bud, seed, embryo). Doublet of germen.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /d͡ʒɜːm/
  • (General American) enPR: jûrm, IPA(key): /d͡ʒɝm/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)m

Noun

germ (plural germs)

  1. (biology) The small mass of cells from which a new organism develops; a seed, bud or spore.
  2. A pathogenic microorganism.
  3. The embryo of a seed, especially of a seed used as a cereal or grain. See Wikipedia article on cereal germ.
  4. (figuratively) The origin of an idea or project.
    the germ of civil liberty
  5. (mathematics) An equivalence class that includes a specified function defined in an open neighborhood.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

germ (third-person singular simple present germs, present participle germing, simple past and past participle germed)

  1. To germinate.
    • 1909, Thomas Hardy, The Flirt’s Tragedy
      Thus tempted, the lust to avenge me / Germed inly and grew.
  2. (slang) To grow, as if parasitic.
    • 2011, Black Eyed Peas, Just Can’t Get Enough
      I’m addicted, want to germ inside your love

See also

  • bacteria
  • microbe
  • parasite
  • virus

Further reading

  • germ in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • germ in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

From Proto-Iranian *garmáh, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *gʰarmás, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰor-mó-s. Cognate with Persian گرم(garm) and English warm.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛɾm

Adjective

germ (comparative germtir, superlative germtirîn)

  1. warm

Derived terms

  • germahî

Zazaki

Etymology

From Proto-Iranian *garmáh, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *gʰarmás, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰor-mó-s. Cognate with Persian گرم(garm) and English warm.

Adjective

germ

  1. warm

Derived terms

  • germey
  • germin
  • germın


English

Etymology

From Middle English sours, from Old French sorse (rise, beginning, spring, source), from sors, past participle of sordre, sourdre, from Latin surgō (to rise), which is composed of sub- (up from below) +‎ regō (lead, rule), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), from the root *h₃reǵ-. See surge.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /so(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /soəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s
  • Homophone: sauce (non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Noun

source (plural sources)

  1. The person, place, or thing from which something (information, goods, etc.) comes or is acquired.
  2. Spring; fountainhead; wellhead; any collection of water on or under the surface of the ground in which a stream originates.
  3. A reporter’s informant.
  4. (computing) Source code.
  5. (electronics) The name of one terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).

Synonyms

  • wellspring

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • resource

Translations

See also

  • target

Verb

source (third-person singular simple present sources, present participle sourcing, simple past and past participle sourced)

  1. (chiefly US) To obtain or procure: used especially of a business resource.
  2. (transitive) To find information about (a quotation)’s source (from which it comes): to find a citation for.

Derived terms

  • (mainly US): sourcing
  • (mainly US): insourcing
  • (mainly US): outsourcing

Translations

Further reading

  • source in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • source in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ‘course, Couser, Crouse, Crusoe, cerous, coures, course, crouse

French

Etymology

From Old French sorse (rise, beginning, spring, source), from sors, past participle of sordre, sourdre, from Latin surgere (to rise). See surge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suʁs/

Noun

source f (plural sources)

  1. source, spring (of water)

Derived terms

  • code source
  • couler de source
  • eau de source
  • langue source
  • prendre sa source
  • source chaude

Descendants

  • Romanian: sursă

Verb

source

  1. inflection of sourcer:
    1. first-person singular/third-person singular present indicative/present subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “source” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • coeurs, cœurs
  • coures
  • course, coursé
  • écrous

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