gesticulate vs motion what difference

what is difference between gesticulate and motion

English

Etymology

From Latin gesticulatus, past participle of gesticulari (to gesticulate), from gesticulus (a mimic gesture), diminutive of gestus (gesture), from gerere, gestum (to bear, carry, perform).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dʒɛsˈtɪkjʊleɪt/, /dʒɛsˈtɪkjəleɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dʒɛsˈtɪkjəleɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkjʊleɪt

Verb

gesticulate (third-person singular simple present gesticulates, present participle gesticulating, simple past and past participle gesticulated)

  1. (intransitive) To make gestures or motions, as in speaking.
  2. (transitive) To say or express through gestures.
    • “…the TV programme Friends is influencing not only the way Irish people speak but also how they gesticulate. Now almost every utterance is accompanied by arms outstretched and palms turned upwards.” Irish Times, December 6, 2004

Related terms

  • gesticulation
  • gesticulative
  • gesture
  • gestural
  • emote

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English mocioun, mocion, from Anglo-Norman motion, Middle French motion, and their etymon Latin motio (movement, motion), related to movēre, from Proto-Indo-European *mew- (to move).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈməʊ.ʃən/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmoʊ.ʃən/
  • Rhymes: -əʊʃən
  • Hyphenation: mot‧ion

Noun

motion (countable and uncountable, plural motions)

  1. (uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.
    Synonym: movement
    Antonym: rest
  2. (countable) A change of position with respect to time.
    • 1667, Richard Allestree, The Causes of the Decay of Christian Piety
      This is the great wheel to which the clock owes its motion.
  3. (physics) A change from one place to another.
    Synonyms: move, movement
    Antonym: rest
    • 1839, Denison Olmsted, A Compendium of Astronomy Page 95
      Secondly, When a body is once in motion it will continue to move forever, unless something stops it. When a ball is struck on the surface of the earth, the friction of the earth and the resistance of the air soon stop its motion.
  4. (countable) A parliamentary action to propose something. A similar procedure in any official or business meeting.
  5. (obsolete) An entertainment or show, especially a puppet show.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica
      when God gave him reason, he gave him freedom to choose, for reason is but choosing; he had bin else a meer artificiall Adam, such an Adam as he is in the motions.
  6. (philosophy) from κίνησις (kinesis); any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 53:
      “I say, it is no uneven jot, to pass from the more faint and obscure examples of Spermatical life to the more considerable effects of general Motion in Minerals, Metalls, and sundry Meteors, whose easie and rude shapes may have no need of any Principle of Life, or Spermatical form distinct from the Rest or Motion of the particles of the Matter.”
  7. Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.
    • Let a good man obey every good motion rising in his heart, knowing that every such motion proceeds from God.
  8. (law) A formal request, oral or written, made to a judge or court of law to obtain an official court ruling or order for a legal action to be taken by, or on behalf of, the movant.
  9. (euphemistic) A movement of the bowels; the product of such movement.
  10. (music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)
    • 1878, George Grove, A Dictionary of Music and Musicians
      The independent motions of different parts sounding together constitute counterpoint.
  11. (obsolete) A puppet, or puppet show.
    • What motion’s this? the model of Nineveh?
  12. (mechanical engineering) A piece of moving mechanism, such as on a steam locomotive.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

motion (third-person singular simple present motions, present participle motioning, simple past and past participle motioned)

  1. To gesture indicating a desired movement.
  2. (proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.
  3. To make a proposal; to offer plans.

Usage notes

The parliamentary sense is incorrectly used by people who are not familiar with parliamentary procedure. They might say “I motion that such-and-such” – however, it would be correct to say “I move that such-and-such”.

Related terms


Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from French motion, from Latin mōtio (movement), from movēre (to move).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mosjoːn/, [moˈɕoːˀn]

Noun

motion c (singular definite motionen, not used in plural form)

  1. exercise (physical activity intended to improve strength and fitness)

Further reading

  • motion on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

French

Etymology

From Old French motion, mocion, borrowed from Latin motiō, motiōnem, noun of action from perfect passive participle motus (having been moved), from verb movere (move), + noun of action suffix -io.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔ.sjɔ̃/

Noun

motion f (plural motions)

  1. motion

Derived terms

  • motion de censure

Related terms

  • mouvoir
  • mouvement

Further reading

  • “motion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French motion, mocion, borrowed from Latin mōtio (movement, motion).

Noun

motion f (plural motions)

  1. (Jersey) motion

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔtˈɧuːn/, /mʊtˈɧuːn/

Noun

motion c

  1. exercise (physical activity)
  2. a motion (proposal from a member of parliament)

Declension

Related terms

  • motionär
  • motionera

Derived terms

  • motionsidrott
  • motionsrunda

References


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