get vs start what difference

what is difference between get and start

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛt/, /ɡɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta, from Proto-Germanic *getaną (compare Old English ġietan, Old High German pigezzan (to uphold), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (bigitan, to find, discover)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (to seize).

Verb

get (third-person singular simple present gets, present participle getting, simple past got or (archaic) gat, past participle gotten or (England, Australia, New Zealand) got or (Geordie) getten)

  1. (ditransitive) To obtain; to acquire.
  2. (transitive) To receive.
  3. (transitive, in a perfect construction, with present-tense meaning) To have. See usage notes.
  4. (transitive) To fetch, bring, take.
    • Get thee out from this land.
  5. (copulative) To become, or cause oneself to become.
    • November 1, 1833, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
      His chariot wheels get hot by driving fast.
  6. (transitive) To cause to become; to bring about.
  7. (transitive) To cause to do.
  8. (transitive) To cause to come or go or move.
  9. (intransitive, with various prepositions, such as into, over, or behind; for specific idiomatic senses see individual entries get into, get over, etc.) To adopt, assume, arrive at, or progress towards (a certain position, location, state).
  10. (transitive) To cover (a certain distance) while travelling.
  11. (intransitive) To begin (doing something or to do something).
  12. (transitive) To take or catch (a scheduled transportation service).
  13. (transitive) To respond to (a telephone call, a doorbell, etc).
  14. (intransitive, followed by infinitive) To be able, be permitted, or have the opportunity (to do something desirable or ironically implied to be desirable).
  15. (transitive, informal) To understand. (compare get it)
  16. (transitive, informal) To be told; be the recipient of (a question, comparison, opinion, etc.).
  17. (informal) To be. Used to form the passive of verbs.
  18. (transitive) To become ill with or catch (a disease).
  19. (transitive, informal) To catch out, trick successfully.
  20. (transitive, informal) To perplex, stump.
  21. (transitive) To find as an answer.
  22. (transitive, informal) To bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal); to effect retribution.
  23. (transitive) To hear completely; catch.
  24. (transitive) To getter.
  25. (now rare) To beget (of a father).
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, page 310:
      Walter had said, dear God, Thomas, it was St fucking Felicity if I’m not mistaken, and her face was to the wall for sure the night I got you.
  26. (archaic) To learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; sometimes with out.
  27. (imperative, informal) Used with a personal pronoun to indicate that someone is being pretentious or grandiose.
    • 1966, Dorothy Fields, If My Friends Could See Me Now (song)
      Brother, get her! Draped on a bedspread made from three kinds of fur!
    • 2007, Tom Dyckhoff, Let’s move to …, The Guardian:
      Money’s pouring in somewhere, because Churchgate’s got lovely new stone setts, and a cultural quarter (ooh, get her) is promised.
  28. (intransitive, informal, chiefly imperative) To go, to leave; to scram.
    • 1991, Theodore Dreiser, T. D. Nostwich, Newspaper Days, University of Pennsylvania Press →ISBN, page 663
      Get, now — get! — before I call an officer and lay a charge against ye.
    • 1952, Fredric Brown and Mack Reynolds, Me and Flapjack and the Martians
      I had a sneaking suspicion that it wasn’t no flashlight and I wasn’t too curious, just then, to find out what would happen if he did more than wave it at me, so I got. I went back about twenty feet or so and watched.
    • 2010, Sarah Webb, The Loving Kind, Pan Macmillan →ISBN:
      ‘Go on, get. You look a state. We can’t let Leo see you like that.’
    • 2012, Paul Zindel, Ladies at the Alamo, Graymalkin Media (→ISBN):
      Now go on, get! Get! Get! (she chases Joanne out the door with the hammer.)
    • 2016, April Daniels, Dreadnought, Diversion Books (→ISBN):
      [] and then I’ll switch over to the police band to know when the bacon’s getting ready to stick its nose in. When I tell you to get, you get, understand?” Calamity asks as she retapes the earbud into her ear.
  29. (euphemistic) To kill.
    They’re coming to get you, Barbara.
  30. (intransitive, obsolete) To make acquisitions; to gain; to profit.
  31. (transitive) To measure.
Usage notes
  • The meaning “to have” is found only in perfect tenses but has present meaning; hence “I have got” has the same meaning as “I have”. (Sometimes the form had got is used to mean “had”, as in “He said they couldn’t find the place because they’d got the wrong address”.) In speech and in all except formal writing, the word “have” is normally reduced to /v/ and spelled “-‘ve” or dropped entirely (e.g. “I got a God-fearing woman, one I can easily afford”, Slow Train, Bob Dylan), leading to nonstandard usages such as “he gots” = “he has”, “he doesn’t got” = “he doesn’t have”.
  • Some dialects (e.g. American English dialects) use both gotten and got as past participles, while others (e.g. dialects of Southern England) use only got. In dialects that use both, got is used for the meanings “to have” and “to have to”, while gotten is used for all other meanings. This allows for a distinction between “I’ve gotten a ticket” (I have received or obtained a ticket) vs. “I’ve got a ticket” (I currently have a ticket).
  • “get” is one of the most common verbs in English, and the many meanings may be confusing for language learners. The following table indicates some of the different constructions found, along with the most common meanings of each:
Synonyms
  • (obtain): acquire, come by, have
  • (receive): receive, be given
  • (fetch): bring, fetch, retrieve
  • (become): become
  • (cause to become): cause to be, cause to become, make
  • (cause to do): make
  • (arrive): arrive at, reach
  • (go, leave): get out go, leave, scram
  • (adopt or assume (a position or state)): go, move
  • (begin): begin, commence, start
  • (catch (a means of public transport)): catch, take
  • (respond to (telephone, doorbell)): answer
  • (be able to; have the opportunity to do): be able to
  • (informal: understand): dig, follow, make sense of, understand
  • (informal: be (used to form the passive)): be
  • (informal: catch (a disease)): catch, come down with
  • (informal: trick): con, deceive, dupe, hoodwink, trick
  • (informal: perplex): confuse, perplex, stump
  • (find as an answer): obtain
  • (bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal)): catch, nab, nobble
  • (physically assault): assault, beat, beat up
  • (informal: hear): catch, hear
  • (getter): getter
Antonyms
  • (obtain): lose
Derived terms
Related terms
  • guess
Translations

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (dated) Offspring.
    • 1810, Thomas Hornby Morland, The genealogy of the English race horse (page 71)
      At the time when I am making these observations, one of his colts is the first favourite for the Derby; and it will be recollected, that a filly of his get won the Oaks in 1808.
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, page 755:
      ‘You were a high lord’s get. Don’t tell me Lord Eddard Stark of Winterfell never killed a man.’
  2. Lineage.
  3. (sports, tennis) A difficult return or block of a shot.
  4. (informal) Something gained; an acquisition.

Etymology 2

Variant of git.

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (Britain, regional) A git.

Etymology 3

From Hebrew גֵּט(gēṭ).

Noun

get (plural gets or gittim or gitten)

  1. (Judaism) A Jewish writ of divorce.
    • 2013, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, ‎George D. Chryssides, ‎Dawoud El-Alami, Love, Sex and Marriage (page 143)
      In Israel, rabbinic courts can imprison men until they acquiesce and grant gets to their wives.
Alternative forms
  • gett
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:get.

References

  • get at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • get in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • GTE, TGE, teg

Icelandic

Verb

get

  1. inflection of geta:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. singular imperative

Ladino

Etymology

From Hebrew גט‎.

Noun

get m (Latin spelling)

  1. divorce

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch iewet, iet. The diphthong /ie̯/ developed into /je/ word-initially, as it did in High German, and the onset was then enclitically hardened to ⟨g⟩ (/ʝ/). Cognate with Dutch iets, Central Franconian jet, northern Luxembourgish jett, gett, English aught.

Pronoun

get

  1. something

Mauritian Creole

Verb

get

  1. Medial form of gete

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • geet, gete, jet, gette, geete, jete, jeete

Etymology

From a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛːt/, /dʒɛt/

Noun

get (uncountable)

  1. jet, hardened coal
  2. A bead made of jet.
  3. A jet-black pigment.

Descendants

  • English: jet

References

  • “ǧē̆t, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-24.

Old Norse

Etymology

From geta.

Noun

get n

  1. (rare) a guess

Declension

Verb

get

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geta
  2. second-person singular imperative of geta

References

  • get in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʝeːt/

Noun

gēt f

  1. goat

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: get

Romanian

Etymology

From French Gétes, Latin Getae, from Ancient Greek.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒet/
  • Rhymes: -et

Noun

get m (plural geți, feminine equivalent getă)

  1. Get, one of the Getae, Greek name for the Dacian people

Synonyms

  • dac

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish gēt, from Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰayd- (goat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jeːt/

Noun

get c

  1. goat

Declension

Anagrams

  • teg


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɑːt/
  • (General American) enPR: stärt, IPA(key): /stɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Etymology 1

From Middle English stert, from the verb sterten (to start, startle). See below.

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. The beginning of an activity.
    The movie was entertaining from start to finish.
  2. A sudden involuntary movement.
    He woke with a start.
    • 1885, Robert Louis Stevenson, Olalla
      The sight of his scared face, his starts and pallors and sudden harkenings, unstrung me []
  3. The beginning point of a race, a board game, etc.
    Captured pieces are returned to the start of the board.
  4. An appearance in a sports game, horserace, etc., from the beginning of the event.
    Jones has been a substitute before, but made his first start for the team last Sunday.
  5. (horticulture) A young plant germinated in a pot to be transplanted later.
    • 2009, Liz Primeau, Steven A. Frowine, Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies
      You generally see nursery starts at garden centres in mid to late spring. Small annual plants are generally sold in four-packs or larger packs, with each cell holding a single young plant.
  6. An initial advantage over somebody else; a head start.
    to get, or have, the start
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Start
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sterten (to leap up suddenly, rush out), from Old English styrtan (to leap up, start), from Proto-West Germanic *sturtijan (to startle, move, set in motion), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ter- (to be stiff). Cognate with Old Frisian stirta (to fall down, tumble), Middle Dutch sterten (to rush, fall, collapse) (Dutch storten), Old High German sturzen (to hurl, plunge, turn upside down) (German stürzen), Old High German sterzan (to be stiff, protrude). More at stare.

Verb

start (third-person singular simple present starts, present participle starting, simple past and past participle started)

  1. (transitive) To begin, commence, initiate.
    1. To set in motion.
      • April 2, 1716, Joseph Addison, Freeholder No. 30
        I was some years ago engaged in conversation with a fashionable French Abbe, upon a subject which the people of that kingdom love to start in discourse.
    2. To begin.
    3. To initiate operation of a vehicle or machine.
    4. To put or raise (a question, an objection); to put forward (a subject for discussion).
    5. To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent.
      • 1674, William Temple, letter to The Countess of Essex
        Sensual men agree in the pursuit of every pleasure they can start.
  2. (intransitive) To begin an activity.
  3. (intransitive) To have its origin (at), begin.
  4. To startle or be startled; to move or be moved suddenly.
    1. (intransitive) To jerk suddenly in surprise.
      • I start as from some dreadful dream.
      • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
        Keep your soul to the work when it is ready to start aside.
      • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXXI:
        […] The tempest’s mocking elf / Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf / He strikes on, only when the timbers start.
    2. (intransitive) To awaken suddenly.
    3. (transitive) To disturb and cause to move suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly.
      • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act I, Scene i[2]:
        […]Upon malicious bravery dost thou come / To start my quiet?
    4. (transitive) To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate.
      • 1676, Richard Wiseman, Severall Chirurgical Treatises
        One, by a fall in wrestling, started the end of the clavicle from the sternon.
  5. (intransitive) To break away, to come loose.
  6. (transitive, sports) To put into play.
    • 2010, Brian Glanville, The Story of the World Cup: The Essential Companion to South Africa 2010, London: Faber and Faber, →ISBN, page 361:
      The charge against Zagallo then is not so much that he started Ronaldo, but that when it should surely have been clear that the player was in no fit state to take part he kept him on.
  7. (transitive, nautical) To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from.
  8. (intransitive, euphemistic) To start one’s periods (menstruation).
Usage notes
  • In uses 1.1 and 1.2 this is a catenative verb that takes the infinitive (to) or the gerund (-ing) form. There is no change in meaning.
  • For more information, see Appendix:English catenative verbs
Antonyms
  • stop
  • end
Derived terms
  • astart
  • start-up
  • starter
Descendants
  • Dutch: starten
  • German: starten
  • Norman: stèrter
  • French: starter
  • Icelandic: starta
  • Faroese: starta
  • Norwegian Bokmål: starte
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: starta
  • Swedish: starta
  • Danish: starte
  • Slovak: štartovať
Translations

See also

Etymology 3

From Middle English stert, start, from Old English steort, stert, from Proto-Germanic *stertaz (tail). Cognate with Dutch staart (tail), German Sterz (tail, handle), Swedish stjärt (tail, arse).

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. A tail, or anything projecting like a tail.
  2. A handle, especially that of a plough.
  3. The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water wheel bucket.
  4. The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse.

Derived terms

  1. redstart

Anagrams

  • Strat, Tarts, strat, tarts

Breton

Adjective

start

  1. firm, strong
  2. difficult

Derived terms

  • startijenn

Further reading

  • Herve Ar Bihan, Colloquial Breton, pages 16 and 268: define “start” as “hard, difficult, firm”

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start

  1. start

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[3], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈstart]

Noun

start m

  1. start (beginning point of a race)

Declension

Related terms

  • připravit se, pozor, start

See also

  • cíl m

Further reading

  • start in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • start in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start c (singular definite starten, plural indefinite starter)

  1. start

Inflection

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/
  • Hyphenation: start
  • Rhymes: -ɑrt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (plural starts, diminutive startje n)

  1. start
Derived terms
  • pikstart
  • startbaan
  • starten
  • startpunt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

start

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of starten
  2. imperative of starten

German

Verb

start

  1. singular imperative of starten

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural starter, definite plural startene)

  1. a start
Derived terms
  • omstart
  • startsted

Etymology 2

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

References

  • “start” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural startar, definite plural startane)

  1. a start (beginning)

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starta

Derived terms

  • omstart

References

  • “start” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /start/

Noun

start m inan

  1. (sports) start (the beginning of a race)
  2. (aviation) takeoff
    Z niecierpliwością czekałam na start samolotu do Paryża.

    I was impatiently waiting for the plane to Paris to take off. (=for its take-off)
  3. participation
    Większość kibiców ucieszyła się, że zdecydował się on na start w zawodach.

    Most fans were happy to hear that he had decided to take part in the competition.

Declension

Derived terms

  • startować (to start, verb)
  • startowy (tarting, take-off, adjective)
  • falstart m (false start, noun)

Further reading

  • start in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

Noun

start c

  1. a start; a beginning (of a race)
  2. the starting (of an engine)

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • starta
  • starter
  • startare

References

  • start in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Anagrams

  • ratts, trast

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [staɾt]
  • Hyphenation: start

Noun

start (definite accusative startı, plural startlar)

  1. start

Usage notes

As Turks are generally not easily spelling consonants at the beginning of a syllable, this word may often be spelled as [sɯtaɾt].

Declension

Antonyms

  • finiş

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