get vs sustain what difference

what is difference between get and sustain

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛt/, /ɡɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta, from Proto-Germanic *getaną (compare Old English ġietan, Old High German pigezzan (to uphold), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (bigitan, to find, discover)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (to seize).

Verb

get (third-person singular simple present gets, present participle getting, simple past got or (archaic) gat, past participle gotten or (England, Australia, New Zealand) got or (Geordie) getten)

  1. (ditransitive) To obtain; to acquire.
  2. (transitive) To receive.
  3. (transitive, in a perfect construction, with present-tense meaning) To have. See usage notes.
  4. (transitive) To fetch, bring, take.
    • Get thee out from this land.
  5. (copulative) To become, or cause oneself to become.
    • November 1, 1833, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
      His chariot wheels get hot by driving fast.
  6. (transitive) To cause to become; to bring about.
  7. (transitive) To cause to do.
  8. (transitive) To cause to come or go or move.
  9. (intransitive, with various prepositions, such as into, over, or behind; for specific idiomatic senses see individual entries get into, get over, etc.) To adopt, assume, arrive at, or progress towards (a certain position, location, state).
  10. (transitive) To cover (a certain distance) while travelling.
  11. (intransitive) To begin (doing something or to do something).
  12. (transitive) To take or catch (a scheduled transportation service).
  13. (transitive) To respond to (a telephone call, a doorbell, etc).
  14. (intransitive, followed by infinitive) To be able, be permitted, or have the opportunity (to do something desirable or ironically implied to be desirable).
  15. (transitive, informal) To understand. (compare get it)
  16. (transitive, informal) To be told; be the recipient of (a question, comparison, opinion, etc.).
  17. (informal) To be. Used to form the passive of verbs.
  18. (transitive) To become ill with or catch (a disease).
  19. (transitive, informal) To catch out, trick successfully.
  20. (transitive, informal) To perplex, stump.
  21. (transitive) To find as an answer.
  22. (transitive, informal) To bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal); to effect retribution.
  23. (transitive) To hear completely; catch.
  24. (transitive) To getter.
  25. (now rare) To beget (of a father).
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, page 310:
      Walter had said, dear God, Thomas, it was St fucking Felicity if I’m not mistaken, and her face was to the wall for sure the night I got you.
  26. (archaic) To learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; sometimes with out.
  27. (imperative, informal) Used with a personal pronoun to indicate that someone is being pretentious or grandiose.
    • 1966, Dorothy Fields, If My Friends Could See Me Now (song)
      Brother, get her! Draped on a bedspread made from three kinds of fur!
    • 2007, Tom Dyckhoff, Let’s move to …, The Guardian:
      Money’s pouring in somewhere, because Churchgate’s got lovely new stone setts, and a cultural quarter (ooh, get her) is promised.
  28. (intransitive, informal, chiefly imperative) To go, to leave; to scram.
    • 1991, Theodore Dreiser, T. D. Nostwich, Newspaper Days, University of Pennsylvania Press →ISBN, page 663
      Get, now — get! — before I call an officer and lay a charge against ye.
    • 1952, Fredric Brown and Mack Reynolds, Me and Flapjack and the Martians
      I had a sneaking suspicion that it wasn’t no flashlight and I wasn’t too curious, just then, to find out what would happen if he did more than wave it at me, so I got. I went back about twenty feet or so and watched.
    • 2010, Sarah Webb, The Loving Kind, Pan Macmillan →ISBN:
      ‘Go on, get. You look a state. We can’t let Leo see you like that.’
    • 2012, Paul Zindel, Ladies at the Alamo, Graymalkin Media (→ISBN):
      Now go on, get! Get! Get! (she chases Joanne out the door with the hammer.)
    • 2016, April Daniels, Dreadnought, Diversion Books (→ISBN):
      [] and then I’ll switch over to the police band to know when the bacon’s getting ready to stick its nose in. When I tell you to get, you get, understand?” Calamity asks as she retapes the earbud into her ear.
  29. (euphemistic) To kill.
    They’re coming to get you, Barbara.
  30. (intransitive, obsolete) To make acquisitions; to gain; to profit.
  31. (transitive) To measure.
Usage notes
  • The meaning “to have” is found only in perfect tenses but has present meaning; hence “I have got” has the same meaning as “I have”. (Sometimes the form had got is used to mean “had”, as in “He said they couldn’t find the place because they’d got the wrong address”.) In speech and in all except formal writing, the word “have” is normally reduced to /v/ and spelled “-‘ve” or dropped entirely (e.g. “I got a God-fearing woman, one I can easily afford”, Slow Train, Bob Dylan), leading to nonstandard usages such as “he gots” = “he has”, “he doesn’t got” = “he doesn’t have”.
  • Some dialects (e.g. American English dialects) use both gotten and got as past participles, while others (e.g. dialects of Southern England) use only got. In dialects that use both, got is used for the meanings “to have” and “to have to”, while gotten is used for all other meanings. This allows for a distinction between “I’ve gotten a ticket” (I have received or obtained a ticket) vs. “I’ve got a ticket” (I currently have a ticket).
  • “get” is one of the most common verbs in English, and the many meanings may be confusing for language learners. The following table indicates some of the different constructions found, along with the most common meanings of each:
Synonyms
  • (obtain): acquire, come by, have
  • (receive): receive, be given
  • (fetch): bring, fetch, retrieve
  • (become): become
  • (cause to become): cause to be, cause to become, make
  • (cause to do): make
  • (arrive): arrive at, reach
  • (go, leave): get out go, leave, scram
  • (adopt or assume (a position or state)): go, move
  • (begin): begin, commence, start
  • (catch (a means of public transport)): catch, take
  • (respond to (telephone, doorbell)): answer
  • (be able to; have the opportunity to do): be able to
  • (informal: understand): dig, follow, make sense of, understand
  • (informal: be (used to form the passive)): be
  • (informal: catch (a disease)): catch, come down with
  • (informal: trick): con, deceive, dupe, hoodwink, trick
  • (informal: perplex): confuse, perplex, stump
  • (find as an answer): obtain
  • (bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal)): catch, nab, nobble
  • (physically assault): assault, beat, beat up
  • (informal: hear): catch, hear
  • (getter): getter
Antonyms
  • (obtain): lose
Derived terms
Related terms
  • guess
Translations

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (dated) Offspring.
    • 1810, Thomas Hornby Morland, The genealogy of the English race horse (page 71)
      At the time when I am making these observations, one of his colts is the first favourite for the Derby; and it will be recollected, that a filly of his get won the Oaks in 1808.
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, page 755:
      ‘You were a high lord’s get. Don’t tell me Lord Eddard Stark of Winterfell never killed a man.’
  2. Lineage.
  3. (sports, tennis) A difficult return or block of a shot.
  4. (informal) Something gained; an acquisition.

Etymology 2

Variant of git.

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (Britain, regional) A git.

Etymology 3

From Hebrew גֵּט(gēṭ).

Noun

get (plural gets or gittim or gitten)

  1. (Judaism) A Jewish writ of divorce.
    • 2013, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, ‎George D. Chryssides, ‎Dawoud El-Alami, Love, Sex and Marriage (page 143)
      In Israel, rabbinic courts can imprison men until they acquiesce and grant gets to their wives.
Alternative forms
  • gett
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:get.

References

  • get at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • get in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • GTE, TGE, teg

Icelandic

Verb

get

  1. inflection of geta:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. singular imperative

Ladino

Etymology

From Hebrew גט‎.

Noun

get m (Latin spelling)

  1. divorce

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch iewet, iet. The diphthong /ie̯/ developed into /je/ word-initially, as it did in High German, and the onset was then enclitically hardened to ⟨g⟩ (/ʝ/). Cognate with Dutch iets, Central Franconian jet, northern Luxembourgish jett, gett, English aught.

Pronoun

get

  1. something

Mauritian Creole

Verb

get

  1. Medial form of gete

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • geet, gete, jet, gette, geete, jete, jeete

Etymology

From a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛːt/, /dʒɛt/

Noun

get (uncountable)

  1. jet, hardened coal
  2. A bead made of jet.
  3. A jet-black pigment.

Descendants

  • English: jet

References

  • “ǧē̆t, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-24.

Old Norse

Etymology

From geta.

Noun

get n

  1. (rare) a guess

Declension

Verb

get

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geta
  2. second-person singular imperative of geta

References

  • get in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʝeːt/

Noun

gēt f

  1. goat

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: get

Romanian

Etymology

From French Gétes, Latin Getae, from Ancient Greek.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒet/
  • Rhymes: -et

Noun

get m (plural geți, feminine equivalent getă)

  1. Get, one of the Getae, Greek name for the Dacian people

Synonyms

  • dac

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish gēt, from Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰayd- (goat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jeːt/

Noun

get c

  1. goat

Declension

Anagrams

  • teg


English

Etymology

From Middle English susteinen, sustenen, from Old French sustenir (French soutenir), from Latin sustineō, sustinēre (to uphold), from sub- (from below, up) + teneō (hold, verb).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈsteɪn/
  • Hyphenation: sus‧tain
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Verb

sustain (third-person singular simple present sustains, present participle sustaining, simple past and past participle sustained)

  1. (transitive) To maintain, or keep in existence.
    The professor had trouble sustaining students’ interest until the end of her lectures.
    The city came under sustained attack by enemy forces.
    • 1949, George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Part Two, Chapter 9,[1]
      All the beliefs, habits, tastes, emotions, mental attitudes that characterize our time are really designed to sustain the mystique of the Party and prevent the true nature of present-day society from being perceived.
  2. (transitive) To provide for or nourish.
    provisions to sustain an army
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Nehemiah 9:21,[2]
      Yea, forty years didst thou sustain them in the wilderness, so that they lacked nothing; their clothes waxed not old, and their feet swelled not.
    • 1937, Robert Byron, The Road to Oxiana, London: Macmillan, Part 2, p. 59,[3]
      We rode five farsakhs today, sustained by a single bowl of curds and tortured by the wooden saddles.
  3. (transitive) To encourage or sanction (something). (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  4. (transitive) To experience or suffer (an injury, etc.).
    The building sustained major damage in the earthquake.
    • c. 1612, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, Henry VIII, Act III, Scene 2,[4]
      [] if you omit
      The offer of this time, I cannot promise
      But that you shall sustain moe new disgraces,
      With these you bear already.
    • 1697, John Dryden (translator), The Aeneid, Book 7, lines 592-593, in The Works of Virgil, London: Jacob Tonson, p. 418,[5]
      Shall Turnus then such endless Toil sustain,
      In fighting Fields, and conquer Towns in vain:
  5. (transitive) To confirm, prove, or corroborate; to uphold.
    to sustain a charge, an accusation, or a proposition
    • 1876, Henry Martyn Robert, Pocket Manual of Rules of Order for Deliberative Assemblies, Chicago: Griggs, 1885, Section 61 (e), p. 167,[6]
      After the vote is taken, the Chairman states that the decision of the Chair is sustained, or reversed, as the case may be.
  6. (law, of a judge) To allow, accept, or admit (e.g. an objection or motion) as valid.
    Antonym: overrule
  7. To keep from falling; to bear; to uphold; to support.
    A foundation sustains the superstructure; an animal sustains a load; a rope sustains a weight.
  8. To aid, comfort, or relieve; to vindicate.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act III, Scene 3,[7]
      When I desir’d their leave that I might pity him, they took from me the use of mine own house, charg’d me on pain of perpetual displeasure neither to speak of him, entreat for him, nor any way sustain him.
    • 1697, John Dryden (translator), The Aeneid, Book 6, lines 1122-1123, in The Works of Virgil, London: Jacob Tonson, p. 395,[8]
      His Sons, who seek the Tyrant to sustain,
      And long for Arbitrary Lords again,

Derived terms

  • sustainable
  • sustainedly
  • sustaining

Related terms

Translations

Noun

sustain (plural sustains)

  1. (music) A mechanism which can be used to hold a note, as the right pedal on a piano.
    • 2011, Chuck Eddy, Rock and Roll Always Forgets (page 265)
      To call this music bland is to ignore the down-the-drain vocal fade-aways, the extended sax sustains []

Anagrams

  • issuant

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