getup vs turnout what difference

what is difference between getup and turnout

English

Alternative forms

  • get up, get-up

Etymology

get +‎ up

Noun

getup (plural getups)

  1. (chiefly US, informal) A costume or outfit, especially one that is ostentatious or otherwise unusual.
    • 1917 Oct. 28, “1,200 Reading Firemen March,” Reading Eagle (Pennsylvania, USA), p. 4:
      The Schnitzelbank Band, each member attired in an odd getup, received many comments for the manner in which the men marched.
    • 2009 June 8, “Worried They Will Miss the War: Inside the Mind of West Point’s Class of 2009,” Newsweek:
      [A] parade of costumed cadets trots by: a shark costume, an Uncle Sam getup and three young men in form-fitting bodysuits.
  2. (informal) A fight or altercation.
    • 2002 Jan. 28, Andrea Sachs, “Caricature Builder,” Time:
      “A bully. Picked on fellows. He loved to fight. But I never saw him in a getup with a fellow his own size.”
  3. (publishing) Layout and production style, as of a magazine.
  4. Alternative form of get-up-and-go

Translations

See also

  • all get up
  • get up

Anagrams

  • Puget


English

Etymology

turn +‎ out, from the phrasal verb.

Noun

turnout (plural turnouts)

  1. The act of coming forth.
  2. The number of people who attend or participate in an event (especially an election) or are present at a venue.
    • 2012, The Hyperink Team, Essential Tools For Managing A Restaurant Business, Hyperink Inc (→ISBN):
      Depending on the location of a restaurant, weekdays may equally experience low turnout.
    • 2016, Alistair Jones, Britain and the European Union, Edinburgh University Press (→ISBN), page 212:
      A country which has always had an exceptionally good turnout for its elections to the European Parliament is Belgium. Every single election has had a turnout of over 90 per cent. The reason for this is that there is compulsory voting in Belgium.
  3. (US) A place to pull off a road.
    When towing a trailer, use the turnouts to let faster traffic pass.
    • 2011, Douglas Steakley, Photographing Big Sur: Where to Find Perfect Shots and How to Take Them, The Countryman Press (→ISBN), page 56:
      This is a location that should not be missed, especially during late afternoons in winter. This field can be photographed from the narrow driveway that leads down to the restaurant or from the turnout south of the restaurant, …
  4. (rail transport, chiefly US) A place where moveable rails allow a train to switch tracks; a set of points.
  5. (dated) A quitting of employment for the purpose of forcing increase of wages; a strike.
  6. (dated) A striker.
    • 2002, Brian Lewis, The Middlemost and the Milltowns (page 86)
      Meanwhile on the eighteenth a party of soldiers dispersed a crowd in Over Darwen, and the following day a detachment came to protect the Hargreaves’ large mill at Accrington, where one of the partners, anticipating a visit from the turnouts, had sworn in several hundred of the workpeople as special constables.
  7. That which is prominently brought forward or exhibited; hence, an equipage.
    A man with a showy carriage and horses is said to have a fine turnout.
    • 1990, Thomas Ryder, The Carriage Journal (volume 27, number 4, pages 164-165)
      Occasionally turnouts would be seen driven randem in circus parades.
  8. Net quantity of produce yielded.

Synonyms

  • (roadside area): lay-by

Derived terms

  • turnout gear

Translations

Anagrams

  • out-turn, outturn

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