ghost vs haunt what difference

what is difference between ghost and haunt

English

Alternative forms

  • ghoast, gost (both obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English gost, gast, from Old English gāst (breath, soul, spirit, ghost, being), from Proto-West Germanic *gaist, from Proto-Germanic *gaistaz (ghost, spirit), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰéysd-os, from *ǵʰéysd- (anger, agitation). Cognate with Scots ghaist (ghost), Saterland Frisian Gäist (spirit), West Frisian geast (spirit), Dutch geest (spirit, mind, ghost), German Geist (spirit, mind, intellect), Swedish gast (ghost), Sanskrit हेड (héḍa, anger, hatred), Persian زشت(zešt, ugly, hateful, disgusting).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡəʊst/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡoʊst/
  • Rhymes: -əʊst

Noun

ghost (countable and uncountable, plural ghosts)

  1. (uncommon or dated) The spirit; the soul of man.
  2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death
    • 1667, John Dryden, Annus Mirabilis
      The mighty ghosts of our great Harries rose.
  3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image.
  4. A false image formed in a telescope, camera, or other optical device by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses.
  5. An unwanted image similar to and overlapping or adjacent to the main one on a television screen, caused by the transmitted image being received both directly and via reflection.
    • 2007, Albert Abramson, The History of Television, 1942 to 2000 (page 60)
      There was less flicker, jitter was nonexistent, and the screen pattern had been rendered far more viewworthy, with ghosts being virtually suppressed.
  6. A ghostwriter.
  7. A nonexistent person invented to obtain some fraudulent benefit.
    • 2004, Joint Learning Initiative, ‎Global Equity Initiative, Human Resources for Health: Overcoming the Crisis (page 76)
      Some health systems are plagued by “ghost” and “absent” workers. Ghost workers are nonexistent, listed in the payroll, and paid, a clear sign of corruption.
    • 2008, The Asia-Pacific Human Development Report (page 63)
      1,500 secondary schools in Jiangxi found 125 cases of illegally collected Ghosts and Absentees fees worth $2 million.
  8. A dead person whose identity is stolen by another. See ghosting.
  9. (Internet) An unresponsive user on IRC, resulting from the user’s client disconnecting without notifying the server.
  10. (computing) An image of a file or hard disk.
  11. (theater) An understudy.
  12. (espionage) A covert (and deniable) agent.
  13. The faint image that remains after an attempt to remove graffiti.
  14. (video games) An opponent in a racing game that follows a previously recorded route, allowing players to compete against previous best times.
  15. (attributive, in names of species) White or pale.
  16. (attributive, in names of species) Transparent or translucent.
  17. (attributive) Abandoned.
  18. (attributive) Remnant; the remains of a(n).
  19. (attributive) Perceived or listed but not real.
  20. (attributive) Of cryptid, supernatural or extraterrestrial nature.
  21. (attributive) Substitute.
  22. (uncountable) A game in which players take turns to add a letter to a possible word, trying not to complete a word.

Synonyms

  • (soul): essence, soul, spirit
  • (spirit appearing after death): apparition, bogey, haint, phantom, revenant, specter/spectre, spook, wraith.
  • (faint shadowy semblance): glimmer, glimmering, glimpse, hint, inkling, phantom, spark, suggestion.
  • (false image in an optical device):
  • (false image on a television screen): echo
  • (ghostwriter): ghostwriter
  • (unresponsive user):
  • (image of file): backup
  • (understudy): understudy
  • (covert agent): spook, spy
  • (image from removed graffiti): shadow
  • (opponent in racing game):
  • (victim of stolen identity):
  • See also Thesaurus:ghost

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ゴースト (gōsuto)

Translations

See also

Verb

ghost (third-person singular simple present ghosts, present participle ghosting, simple past and past participle ghosted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To haunt; to appear to in the form of an apparition.
    • 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, sc. 6, l. 1221
      since Julius Caesar, / Who at Philippi the good Brutus ghosted
  2. (obsolete) To die; to expire.
  3. (literary) To imbue with a ghost-like hue or effect.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To ghostwrite.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 41]:
      Well, you wrote a few books, you wrote a famous play, and even that was half ghosted.
  5. (nautical) To sail seemingly without wind.
  6. (computing) To copy a file or hard drive image.
  7. (graphical user interface) To gray out (a visual item) to indicate that it is unavailable.
    • 1991, Amiga User Interface Style Guide (page 76)
      Whenever a menu or menu item is inappropriate or unavailable for selection, it should be ghosted. Never allow the user to select something that does nothing in response.
  8. (Internet, transitive) To forcibly disconnect an IRC user who is using one’s reserved nickname.
    • 2001, “Luke”, to leave (vb.): Hurg [OT] (on newsgroup alt.games.lucas-arts.monkey-island)
      I’m so untechnical that I once ghosted a registered IRC nick and then tried to identify myself to NickServ with the valid password before actually changing my nick to the aforementioned moniker.
  9. (intransitive) To appear or move without warning, quickly and quietly; to slip.
  10. (transitive) To transfer (a prisoner) to another prison without the prior knowledge of other inmates.
    • 2020, Jamie Bennett, ‎Victoria Knight, Prisoners on Prison Films (page 26)
      His power base, however, is undermined by him being constantly, “ghosted”, or moved from prison to prison.
  11. (slang) To kill.
  12. (slang) To break up with someone without warning or explanation; to perform an act of ghosting.
  13. (transitive, slang) To ignore (a person).
  14. (film) To provide the speaking or singing voice for another actor, who is lip-syncing.
    • 1955, Saturday Review (volume 38, part 2, page 27)
      Here’s how it went: Larry Parks as elderly Al Jolson was watching Larry Parks playing young Al Jolson in the first movie — in other words, Parks ghosting for Parks. At the same time, Jolson himself was ghosting the voices for both of them.
    • 1999, The Golden Age of Musicals (page 50)
      One of the few performers to triumph over ghosting was Ava Gardner in Freed’s Show Boat (1951). Not only does she lip-synch with breathtaking accuracy, her performance gives the cotton-candy production its only underpinning of realism.

Derived terms

  • beghost

Anagrams

  • Goths, gosht, goths


English

Alternative forms

  • hant (Scotland), haint (US, dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English haunten (to reside, inhabit, use, employ), from Old French hanter (to inhabit, frequent, resort to), from Old Northern French hanter (to go back home, frequent), from Old Norse heimta (to bring home, fetch) or/and from Old English hāmettan (to bring home; house; cohabit with); both from Proto-Germanic *haimatjaną (to house, bring home), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (village, home), from Proto-Indo-European *kōym- (village).

Cognate with Old English hāmettan (to provide housing to, bring home); related to Old English hām (home, village), Old French hantin (a stay, a place frequented by) from the same Germanic source. Another descendant from the French is Dutch hanteren, whence German hantieren, Swedish hantera, Danish håndtere. More at home.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hônt, IPA(key): /hɔːnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːnt
  • (some accents) enPR: hänt, IPA(key): /hɑːnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːnt
  • (some accents for noun definition #2) enPR: hănt, IPA(key): /hænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Verb

haunt (third-person singular simple present haunts, present participle haunting, simple past and past participle haunted)

  1. (transitive) To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).
    • Foul spirits haunt my resting place.
    • 1713, Jonathan Swift, Imitation of Horace, Book I. Ep. VII.
      those cares that haunt the court and town
  2. (transitive) To make uneasy, restless.
  3. (transitive) To stalk, to follow
  4. (intransitive, now rare) To live habitually; to stay, to remain.
  5. (transitive, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To accustom; habituate; make accustomed to.
  6. (transitive, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To practise; to devote oneself to.
    • 1570, Roger Ascham, The School master
      Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime.
  7. (intransitive) To persist in staying or visiting.

Synonyms

  • (to make uneasy): nag
  • (to live habitually): live, dwell; See also Thesaurus:reside

Translations

Noun

haunt (plural haunts)

  1. A place at which one is regularly found; a habitation or hangout.
    • 1868, Louisa May Alcott, “Kitty’s Class Day”:
      Both Jack and Fletcher had graduated the year before, but still took an interest in their old haunts, and patronized the fellows who were not yet through.
    • 1984, Timothy Loughran and Natalie Angier, “Science: Striking It Rich in Wyoming,” Time, 8 Oct.:
      Wyoming has been a favorite haunt of paleontologists for the past century ever since westering pioneers reported that many vertebrate fossils were almost lying on the ground.
  2. (dialect) A ghost.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the “Stranger People’s” Country, Nebraska 2005, page 93:
      Harnts don’t wander much ginerally,’ he said. ‘They hand round thar own buryin’-groun’ mainly.’
  3. A feeding place for animals.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Utahn, unhat

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