ghost vs touch what difference

what is difference between ghost and touch

English

Alternative forms

  • ghoast, gost (both obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English gost, gast, from Old English gāst (breath, soul, spirit, ghost, being), from Proto-West Germanic *gaist, from Proto-Germanic *gaistaz (ghost, spirit), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰéysd-os, from *ǵʰéysd- (anger, agitation). Cognate with Scots ghaist (ghost), Saterland Frisian Gäist (spirit), West Frisian geast (spirit), Dutch geest (spirit, mind, ghost), German Geist (spirit, mind, intellect), Swedish gast (ghost), Sanskrit हेड (héḍa, anger, hatred), Persian زشت(zešt, ugly, hateful, disgusting).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡəʊst/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡoʊst/
  • Rhymes: -əʊst

Noun

ghost (countable and uncountable, plural ghosts)

  1. (uncommon or dated) The spirit; the soul of man.
  2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death
    • 1667, John Dryden, Annus Mirabilis
      The mighty ghosts of our great Harries rose.
  3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image.
  4. A false image formed in a telescope, camera, or other optical device by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses.
  5. An unwanted image similar to and overlapping or adjacent to the main one on a television screen, caused by the transmitted image being received both directly and via reflection.
    • 2007, Albert Abramson, The History of Television, 1942 to 2000 (page 60)
      There was less flicker, jitter was nonexistent, and the screen pattern had been rendered far more viewworthy, with ghosts being virtually suppressed.
  6. A ghostwriter.
  7. A nonexistent person invented to obtain some fraudulent benefit.
    • 2004, Joint Learning Initiative, ‎Global Equity Initiative, Human Resources for Health: Overcoming the Crisis (page 76)
      Some health systems are plagued by “ghost” and “absent” workers. Ghost workers are nonexistent, listed in the payroll, and paid, a clear sign of corruption.
    • 2008, The Asia-Pacific Human Development Report (page 63)
      1,500 secondary schools in Jiangxi found 125 cases of illegally collected Ghosts and Absentees fees worth $2 million.
  8. A dead person whose identity is stolen by another. See ghosting.
  9. (Internet) An unresponsive user on IRC, resulting from the user’s client disconnecting without notifying the server.
  10. (computing) An image of a file or hard disk.
  11. (theater) An understudy.
  12. (espionage) A covert (and deniable) agent.
  13. The faint image that remains after an attempt to remove graffiti.
  14. (video games) An opponent in a racing game that follows a previously recorded route, allowing players to compete against previous best times.
  15. (attributive, in names of species) White or pale.
  16. (attributive, in names of species) Transparent or translucent.
  17. (attributive) Abandoned.
  18. (attributive) Remnant; the remains of a(n).
  19. (attributive) Perceived or listed but not real.
  20. (attributive) Of cryptid, supernatural or extraterrestrial nature.
  21. (attributive) Substitute.
  22. (uncountable) A game in which players take turns to add a letter to a possible word, trying not to complete a word.

Synonyms

  • (soul): essence, soul, spirit
  • (spirit appearing after death): apparition, bogey, haint, phantom, revenant, specter/spectre, spook, wraith.
  • (faint shadowy semblance): glimmer, glimmering, glimpse, hint, inkling, phantom, spark, suggestion.
  • (false image in an optical device):
  • (false image on a television screen): echo
  • (ghostwriter): ghostwriter
  • (unresponsive user):
  • (image of file): backup
  • (understudy): understudy
  • (covert agent): spook, spy
  • (image from removed graffiti): shadow
  • (opponent in racing game):
  • (victim of stolen identity):
  • See also Thesaurus:ghost

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ゴースト (gōsuto)

Translations

See also

Verb

ghost (third-person singular simple present ghosts, present participle ghosting, simple past and past participle ghosted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To haunt; to appear to in the form of an apparition.
    • 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, sc. 6, l. 1221
      since Julius Caesar, / Who at Philippi the good Brutus ghosted
  2. (obsolete) To die; to expire.
  3. (literary) To imbue with a ghost-like hue or effect.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To ghostwrite.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 41]:
      Well, you wrote a few books, you wrote a famous play, and even that was half ghosted.
  5. (nautical) To sail seemingly without wind.
  6. (computing) To copy a file or hard drive image.
  7. (graphical user interface) To gray out (a visual item) to indicate that it is unavailable.
    • 1991, Amiga User Interface Style Guide (page 76)
      Whenever a menu or menu item is inappropriate or unavailable for selection, it should be ghosted. Never allow the user to select something that does nothing in response.
  8. (Internet, transitive) To forcibly disconnect an IRC user who is using one’s reserved nickname.
    • 2001, “Luke”, to leave (vb.): Hurg [OT] (on newsgroup alt.games.lucas-arts.monkey-island)
      I’m so untechnical that I once ghosted a registered IRC nick and then tried to identify myself to NickServ with the valid password before actually changing my nick to the aforementioned moniker.
  9. (intransitive) To appear or move without warning, quickly and quietly; to slip.
  10. (transitive) To transfer (a prisoner) to another prison without the prior knowledge of other inmates.
    • 2020, Jamie Bennett, ‎Victoria Knight, Prisoners on Prison Films (page 26)
      His power base, however, is undermined by him being constantly, “ghosted”, or moved from prison to prison.
  11. (slang) To kill.
  12. (slang) To break up with someone without warning or explanation; to perform an act of ghosting.
  13. (transitive, slang) To ignore (a person).
  14. (film) To provide the speaking or singing voice for another actor, who is lip-syncing.
    • 1955, Saturday Review (volume 38, part 2, page 27)
      Here’s how it went: Larry Parks as elderly Al Jolson was watching Larry Parks playing young Al Jolson in the first movie — in other words, Parks ghosting for Parks. At the same time, Jolson himself was ghosting the voices for both of them.
    • 1999, The Golden Age of Musicals (page 50)
      One of the few performers to triumph over ghosting was Ava Gardner in Freed’s Show Boat (1951). Not only does she lip-synch with breathtaking accuracy, her performance gives the cotton-candy production its only underpinning of realism.

Derived terms

  • beghost

Anagrams

  • Goths, gosht, goths


English

Etymology

From Middle English touchen, tochen, from Old French tochier (to touch) (whence Modern French toucher; compare French doublet toquer (to offend, bother, harass)), from Vulgar Latin *tuccō (to knock, strike, offend), from Frankish *tukkōn (to knock, strike, touch), from Proto-Germanic *tukkōną (to tug, grab, grasp), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to draw, pull, lead). Displaced native Middle English rinen, from Old English hrīnan (to touch, reach, strike)” (whence Modern English rine); Middle English repen, from Old English hrepian.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʌt͡ʃ/, enPR: tûch
  • Rhymes: -ʌtʃ

Verb

touch (third-person singular simple present touches, present participle touching, simple past and past participle touched)

  1. Primarily physical senses.
    1. (transitive) To make physical contact with; to bring the hand, finger or other part of the body into contact with. [from 14th c.]
    2. (transitive) To come into (involuntary) contact with; to meet or intersect. [from 14th c.]
    3. (intransitive) To come into physical contact, or to be in physical contact. [from 14th c.]
    4. (intransitive) To make physical contact with a thing. [from 14th c.]
    5. (transitive) To physically disturb; to interfere with, molest, or attempt to harm through contact. [from 14th c.]
      • Let us make a covenant with thee, that thou wilt do us no hurt, as we have not touched thee.
    6. (transitive) To cause to be briefly in contact with something.
      He quickly touched his knee to the worn marble.
      The demonstrator nearly touched the rod on the ball.
      She touched her lips to the glass.
    7. (transitive) To physically affect in specific ways implied by context. [from 15th c.]
    8. (transitive) To consume, or otherwise use. [from 15th c.]
    9. (intransitive) Of a ship or its passengers: to land, to make a short stop (at). [from 16th c.]
      • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
        Now a certain grand merchant ship once touched at Rokovoko, and its commander — from all accounts, a very stately punctilious gentleman, at least for a sea captain — this commander was invited to the wedding feast of Queequeg’s sister, a pretty young princess just turned of ten.
    10. (transitive, now historical) To lay hands on (someone suffering from scrofula) as a form of cure, as formerly practised by English and French monarchs. [from 17th c.]
      • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society (2012), page 189:
        But in fact the English kings of the seventeenth century usually began to touch form the day of their accession, without waiting for any such consecration.
    11. (transitive or reflexive) To sexually excite with the fingers; to finger or masturbate. [from 20th c.]
    12. (intransitive, obsolete) To fasten; to take effect; to make impression.
    13. (nautical) To bring (a sail) so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.
    14. (intransitive, nautical) To be brought, as a sail, so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.
    15. (nautical) To keep the ship as near (the wind) as possible.
  2. Primarily non-physical senses.
    1. (transitive) To imbue or endow with a specific quality. [from 14th c.]
    2. (transitive, archaic) To deal with in speech or writing; to mention briefly, to allude to. [from 14th c.]
      • , I.2.4.vii:
        Next to sorrow still I may annex such accidents as procure fear; for besides those terrors which I have before touched, [] there is a superstitious fear [] which much trouble many of us.
    3. (intransitive) To deal with in speech or writing; briefly to speak or write (on or upon something). [from 14th c.]
      • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde
        “Well, but since we have touched upon this business, and for the last time I hope,” continued the doctor, “there is one point I should like you to understand.”
    4. (transitive) To concern, to have to do with. [14th-19th c.]
      • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts V:
        Men of Israhell take hede to youreselves what ye entende to do as touchinge these men.
      • 1919, Saki, ‘The Penance’, The Toys of Peace, Penguin 2000 (Complete Short Stories), page 423:
        And now it seemed he was engaged in something which touched them closely, but must be hidden from their knowledge.
    5. (transitive) To affect emotionally; to bring about tender or painful feelings in. [from 14th c.]
      • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act IV, sc. 1:
        If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent
        to offend, for if it touch not you, it comes near
        nobody.
    6. (transitive, dated) To affect in a negative way, especially only slightly. [from 16th c.]
    7. (transitive, Scottish history) To give royal assent to by touching it with the sceptre. [from 17th c.]
    8. (transitive, slang) To obtain money from, usually by borrowing (from a friend). [from 18th c.]
    9. (transitive, always passive) To disturb the mental functions of; to make somewhat insane; often followed with “in the head”. [from 18th c.]
    10. (transitive, in negative constructions) To be on the level of; to approach in excellence or quality. [from 19th c.]
      • 1928, Dorothy L. Sayers, “The Abominable History of the Man with Copper Fingers”, in Lord Peter Views the Body,
        There was his mistress, Maria Morano. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything to touch her, and when you work for the screen [as I do] you’re apt to have a pretty exacting standard of female beauty.
    11. (transitive) To come close to; to approach.
      • 2012, July 15. Richard Williams in Guardian Unlimited, Tour de France 2012: Carpet tacks cannot force Bradley Wiggins off track
        On Sunday afternoon it was as dark as night, with barely room for two riders abreast on a gradient that touches 20%.
    12. (transitive, computing) To mark (a file or document) as having been modified.
  3. To try; to prove, as with a touchstone.
  4. To mark or delineate with touches; to add a slight stroke to with the pencil or brush.
  5. (obsolete) To infect; to affect slightly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  6. To strike; to manipulate; to play on.
  7. To perform, as a tune; to play.
  8. To influence by impulse; to impel forcibly.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

touch (countable and uncountable, plural touches)

  1. An act of touching, especially with the hand or finger.
    Suddenly, in the crowd, I felt a touch at my shoulder.
  2. The faculty or sense of perception by physical contact.
    With the lights out, she had to rely on touch to find her desk.
  3. The style or technique with which one plays a musical instrument.
    He performed one of Ravel’s piano concertos with a wonderfully light and playful touch.
  4. (music) The particular or characteristic mode of action, or the resistance of the keys of an instrument to the fingers.
    a heavy touch, or a light touch
  5. A distinguishing feature or characteristic.
    Clever touches like this are what make her such a brilliant writer.
  6. A little bit; a small amount.
    Move it left just a touch and it will be perfect.
    I’d like to see a touch more enthusiasm in the project.
  7. The part of a sports field beyond the touchlines or goal-lines.
    He got the ball, and kicked it straight out into touch.
  8. A relationship of close communication or understanding.
    He promised to keep in touch while he was away.
  9. The ability to perform a task well; aptitude.
    I used to be a great chess player but I’ve lost my touch.
  10. (obsolete) Act or power of exciting emotion.
  11. (obsolete) An emotion or affection.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      a true, natural, and a sensible touch of mercy
  12. (obsolete) Personal reference or application.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Discourse
      Speech of touch toward others should be sparingly used.
  13. A single stroke on a drawing or a picture.
    • 1695, John Dryden, The Art of Painting
      Never give the least touch with your pencil till you have well examined your design.
  14. (obsolete) A brief essay.
    • 1713, Jonathan Swift, A Preface to Bishop Burnet’s Introduction
      Print my preface in such form as, in the booksellers’ phrase, will make a sixpenny touch.
  15. (obsolete) A touchstone; hence, stone of the sort used for touchstone.
    • a neat new monument of touch and alabaster
  16. (obsolete) Examination or trial by some decisive standard; test; proof; tried quality.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall
      equity, the true touch of all laws
  17. (shipbuilding) The broadest part of a plank worked top and but, or of one worked anchor-stock fashion (that is, tapered from the middle to both ends); also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Knowles to this entry?)
  18. The children’s game of tag.
  19. (bell-ringing) A set of changes less than the total possible on seven bells, i.e. less than 5,040.
  20. (slang) An act of borrowing or stealing something.
  21. (Britain, plumbing, dated) Tallow.
  22. Form; standard of performance.
    • 2019 In the mix: Who’s pushing for selection for round seven? Australian Football League, 30 April 2019. Accessed 6 May 2019.
      Jackson Hately, Isaac Cumming and Nick Shipley have been in great touch in the NEAFL.
  23. (Australian rules football) A disposal of the ball during a game, i.e. a kick or a handball.
    • 2019 In the mix: Who’s pushing for selection for round seven? Australian Football League, 30 April 2019. Accessed 6 May 2019.
      With just six touches, small forward Daniel Rioli was uncharacteristically quiet against Melbourne, although he did lay five tackles.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • touch at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • chout, couth

Spanish

Adjective

touch (invariable)

  1. touch; touch-screen

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