ghostly vs spiritual what difference

what is difference between ghostly and spiritual

English

Etymology

From Middle English gostly, gastlich, from Old English gāstlīċ (spiritual, holy, clerical (not lay), ghastly, ghostly, spectral), equivalent to ghost +‎ -ly. Cognate with Scots gostly, gastly, gaistlie (spiritual, ghastly, terrifying), West Frisian geastlik (spiritual, clerical, religious), Dutch geestelijk (spiritual, clerical, ecclesiastical), German geistlich (spiritual, sacred, religious), Danish geistlig (ecclesiastical, clerical).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡoʊstli/

Adjective

ghostly (comparative ghostlier, superlative ghostliest)

  1. Of or pertaining to ghosts or spirits.
  2. Spooky; frightening.
    • 1929, Robert Dean Frisbee, The Book of Puka-Puka (republished by Eland, 2019; p. 35):
      Scores of coconut-shell fires blazed with their characteristic glaring white flame, throwing grotesque shadows on the brown thatched huts, dancing in fairylike shimmerings among the domes of coconut fronds, casting ghostly reaches of light through the adjacent graveyards, and silhouetting the forms of pareu-clad natives at work cleaning their fish or laying them on the live coals to broil.
    • 2019, Dave Eggers, The Parade, Vintage Books N.Y., p. 134
      His lips were chapped and lined with a ghostly purple fringe.
  3. Relating to the soul; not carnal or secular; spiritual.
    a ghostly confessor
    • Save and defend us from our ghostly enemies.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      one of the ghostly children of St. Jerome

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:ghostly

Translations

See also

  • ghastly


English

Alternative forms

  • (all obsolete) spirituall, spirytual, spirytuall, spyritual, spyrituall, spyrytual, spyrytuall

Etymology

From Middle English spiritual, spirituel, from Old French spirituel, from Late Latin spiritualis, from Latin spiritus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈspɪɹɪtʃʊəl/, /ˈspɪɹɪtjʊəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈspɪɹɪtʃuəl/, /ˈspɪɹɪ̈t͡ʃul̩/

Adjective

spiritual (comparative more spiritual, superlative most spiritual)

  1. Of or pertaining to the spirit or the soul.
  2. Of or pertaining to God or a place of worship; sacred.
  3. Of or pertaining to spirits; supernatural.
  4. Consisting of spirit; not material; incorporeal.
    a spiritual substance or being
    • It is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.
  5. Of or relating to the intellectual and higher endowments of the mind; mental; intellectual.
  6. (Christianity) Controlled and inspired by the Holy Spirit; pure; holy.
    • If a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one.
  7. Not lay or temporal; relating to sacred things; ecclesiastical.
    the spiritual functions of the clergy; lords spiritual and temporal; a spiritual corporation

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

spiritual (plural spirituals)

  1. A Christian religious song, especially one in an African-American style, or a similar non-religious song.
  2. Any spiritual function, office, or affair.
    He assigns supremacy to the pope in spirituals, and to the emperor in temporals. — Lowell.

Synonyms

  • folk song

Translations

References

  • spiritual at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • spiritual in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • spiritual in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French spirituel, Late Latin spīrituālis, from Latin spiritus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spirituˈal/

Adjective

spiritual m or n (feminine singular spirituală, masculine plural spirituali, feminine and neuter plural spirituale)

  1. spiritual

Declension

Synonyms

  • sufletesc

Related terms

  • spiritualism
  • spiritualitate

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial