giant vs monster what difference

what is difference between giant and monster

English

Alternative forms

  • giaunt (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English geaunt, geant, from Old French geant, gaiant (Modern French géant) from Vulgar Latin *gagās, gagant-, from Latin gigās, gigant-, from Ancient Greek γίγας (gígas, giant) Cognate to giga- (1,000,000,000).

Displaced native Middle English eten, ettin (from Old English ēoten), and Middle English eont (from Old English ent).

Compare Modern English ent (giant tree-man) and Old English þyrs (giant, monster, demon).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪ.ənt/
    • (dialectal, nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪnt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪənt
  • Hyphenation: gi‧ant

Noun

giant (plural giants)

  1. A mythical human of very great size.
  2. (mythology) Specifically:
    1. Any of the gigantes, the race of giants in the Greek mythology.
    2. A jotun.
  3. A very tall and large person.
  4. A tall species of a particular animal or plant.
  5. (astronomy) A star that is considerably more luminous than a main sequence star of the same temperature (e.g. red giant, blue giant).
  6. (computing) An Ethernet packet that exceeds the medium’s maximum packet size of 1,518 bytes.
  7. A very large organisation.
  8. A person of extraordinary strength or powers, bodily or intellectual.
    • 1988, Thomas Dolby, “Airhead”:
      she’s not the intellectual giant
  9. (gymnastics) A maneuver involving a full rotation around an axis while fully extended.

Synonyms

See also: Thesaurus:giant

Derived terms

  • Giant’s Causeway

Translations

Adjective

giant (not comparable)

  1. Very large.

Synonyms

  • colossal, enormous, gigantic, immense, prodigious, vast
  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Antonyms

  • dwarf
  • midget

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Ngāti, TA’ing, TAing, Taing, anti-g, tagin, tangi, tiang, tinga


English

Alternative forms

  • monstre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English monstre, borrowed from Old French monstre, mostre, moustre, from Latin mōnstrum.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmɒnstə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: mŏn’stə(r), IPA(key): /ˈmɑnstɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnstə(ɹ)

Noun

monster (plural monsters)

  1. A terrifying and dangerous creature.
  2. A bizarre or whimsical creature.
  3. A cruel, heartless, or antisocial person, especially a criminal.
    Get away from those children, you meatheaded monster!
  4. (medicine, archaic) A horribly deformed person.
    • 1837, Medico-Chirurgical Review (page 465)
      Deducting then these cases, we have a large proportion of imperfect foetuses, which belonged to twin conceptions, and in which, therefore, the circulation of the monster may have essentially depended on that of the sound child.
  5. (figuratively) A badly behaved child, a brat.
  6. (informal) Something unusually large.
  7. (informal) A prodigy; someone very talented in a specific domain.
  8. (gaming) A non-player character that player(s) fight against in role-playing games.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • monstrous
  • monstrously
  • monstrose

Translations

Descendants

  • German: Monster
  • Japanese: モンスター
  • Korean: 몬스터 (monseuteo)

Adjective

monster (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Very large; worthy of a monster.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Pope to this entry?)
  2. (informal) Great; very good; excellent.

Synonyms

  • (very large): gigantic, monstrous

Translations

Verb

monster (third-person singular simple present monsters, present participle monstering, simple past and past participle monstered)

  1. To make into a monster; to categorise as a monster; to demonise.
    • 1983, Michael Slater, Dickens and Women, page 290,
      A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations feature four cases of women monstered by passion. Madame Defarge is ‘a tigress’, Mrs Joe a virago, Molly (Estella′s criminal mother) ‘a wild beast tamed’ and Miss Havisham a witch-like creature, a ghastly combination of waxwork and skeleton.
    • 2005, Diana Medlicott, The Unbearable Brutality of Being: Casual Cruelty in Prison and What This Tells Us About Who We Really Are, Margaret Sönser Breen (editor), Minding Evil: Explorations of Human Iniquity, page 82,
      The community forgives: this is in deep contrast to offenders that emerge from prison and remain stigmatised and monstered, often unable to get work or housing.
    • 2011, Stephen T. Asma, On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears, page 234,
      Demonizing or monstering other groups has even become part of the cycle of American politics.
  2. To behave as a monster to; to terrorise.
    • 1968, Robert Lowell, Robert Lowell: A Collection of Critical Essays, page 145,
      Animals in our world have been monstered by human action as much as the free beasts of the pre-lapsarian state were monstered by the primal crime.
    • 2009, Darius Rejali, Torture and Democracy, page 292,
      In 2002, American interrogators on the ground in Afghanistan developed a technique they called “monstering.” The commander “instituted a new rule that a prisoner could be kept awake and in the booth for as long as an interrogator could last.” One “monstering” interrogator engaged in this for thirty hours.177
    • 2010, Joshua E. S. Phillips, None of Us Were Like This Before: American Soldiers and Torture, page 39,
      The interrogators asked members of the 377th Military Police Company to help them with monstering, and the MPs complied.
  3. (chiefly Australia) To harass.

Anagrams

  • Monters, mentors, meronts, metrons, monstre, montres, termons

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔnstər/
  • Hyphenation: mon‧ster

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch monster, probably from Old French monstre, from Latin mōnstrum. Cognate with English monster.

Noun

monster n (plural monsters, diminutive monstertje n)

  1. A monster, terrifying and dangerous creature.
  2. An extremely antisocial person, especially a criminal.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: monsta

Etymology 2

Cognate with English muster.

Noun

monster n (plural monsters, diminutive monstertje n)

  1. sample; small, representative quantity of a substance or material, as used for analysis or selection.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: mònster, monster

Verb

monster

  1. first-person singular present indicative of monsteren
  2. imperative of monsteren

Anagrams

  • morsten, stormen, stromen

Swedish

Etymology

From Latin monstrum.

Pronunciation

Noun

monster n

  1. A monster, terrifying and dangerous creature.

Declension

Synonyms

  • odjur
  • vidunder
  • best

Anagrams

  • mentors, mostern, stormen

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