gibbet vs pillory what difference

what is difference between gibbet and pillory

English

Etymology

From Middle English gibet, from Old French gibet (French gibet), either from Frankish *gibb (forked stick) or from Latin gibbus (hunchbacked).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒɪbɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪbɪt

Noun

gibbet (plural gibbets)

  1. An upright post with a crosspiece used for execution and subsequent public display.
    Synonym: gallows
  2. The projecting arm of a crane, from which the load is suspended; the jib.
  3. A human-shaped structure made of iron bands designed to publicly display the corpse of an executed criminal.

Translations

Verb

gibbet (third-person singular simple present gibbets, present participle gibbeting or gibbetting, simple past and past participle gibbeted or gibbetted)

  1. (transitive) To execute (someone), or display (a body), on a gibbet.
  2. (transitive) To expose (someone) to ridicule or scorn.

Translations

References


Middle English

Noun

gibbet

  1. Alternative form of gibet


English

Etymology

From Middle English pillori, from Old French pilori, pellori, which is either from Old Occitan espilori or Latin pīla (pillar).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪləɹi/

Noun

pillory (plural pillories)

  1. A framework on a post, with holes for the hands and head, used as a means of punishment and humiliation.

Translations

Verb

pillory (third-person singular simple present pillories, present participle pillorying, simple past and past participle pilloried)

  1. (transitive) To put in a pillory.
  2. (transitive) To subject to humiliation, scorn, ridicule or abuse.
  3. (transitive) To criticize harshly.

Translations


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