gift vs give what difference

what is difference between gift and give

English

Alternative forms

  • yift (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English gift (also yift, yeft, ȝift, ȝeft), partly from Old English ġift (giving, consideration, dowry, wedding) and Old Norse gipt (gift, present, wedding); both from Proto-Germanic *giftiz (gift). Equivalent to give +‎ -th (etymologically yive + -th). Cognate with West Frisian jefte (gift), Saterland Frisian Gift (gift), German Low German Gift (poison), Dutch gift (gift) and its doublet gif (poison), German Gift (poison), Swedish gift (gift, poison, venom), Icelandic gift (gift). Doublet of yift.

Pronunciation

  • (US, UK) enPR: gĭft, IPA(key): /ɡɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift (plural gifts)

  1. Something given to another voluntarily, without charge.
  2. A talent or natural ability.
  3. Something gained incidentally, without effort.
  4. The act, right, or power of giving or bestowing.

Synonyms

  • (something freely given by another): See Thesaurus:gift For beneficial actions, see favor.
  • (something god-given): ability, aptitude, knack, talent, strength

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ギフト (gifuto)

Translations

See also

  • lagniappe

Verb

gift (third-person singular simple present gifts, present participle gifting, simple past and past participle gifted)

  1. (transitive) To give as a gift or donation.
  2. (transitive) To give away, to concede easily.

Synonyms

  • contribute
  • donate
  • give

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • T.G.I.F., TGIF

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡift/, [ɡ̊ifd̥]

Etymology 1

From German Gift (poison). Similar to the archaic gift (gift), a verbal noun to give (to give).

Noun

gift c (singular definite giften, plural indefinite gifte)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)
Inflection

Derived terms

See also

  • gift on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

Originally the past participle of gifte (marry).

Adjective

gift

  1. married
Inflection
Derived terms
  • ugift

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte
  2. past participle of gifte

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch gifte, from Old Dutch *gift, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz. The words gif and vergif, both meaning “poison”, derive from the same source as gift. The sense “poison” may have originated as a shortening of vergift or may have been borrowed from German Gift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɪft/
  • Hyphenation: gift
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. donation; something given (away) voluntarily.
    Synonyms: cadeau, geschenk, schenking
Derived terms
  • grafgift
  • huwelijksgift

Noun

gift n or f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. (dated) poison
    Synonyms: gif, venijn, vergif, vergift
Derived terms
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) poisonous, toxic, venomous
    Synonym: giftig

Inflection

Related terms

  • geven, gave
  • vergiftigen, ontgiften, begiftigen

Faroese

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, uncountable)

  1. poison

Declension

Synonyms

  • eitur

Adjective

gift

  1. married, female form of giftur
    • Ert tú gift?
      Are you (f) married?

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse gipt, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /cɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, nominative plural giftir)

  1. (obsolete) gift
    Synonym: gjöf

Declension

Related terms

  • gifta

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

gift f or m (definite singular gifta or giften, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)

Derived terms

  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Related terms

  • forgifte
  • forgiftning
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (neuter singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Antonyms

  • ugift

Derived terms

  • nygift

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪft/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gipt.

Noun

gift f (definite singular gifta, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison
Derived terms
  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Etymology 2

Past participle of gifta.

Adjective

gift (indefinite singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Participle

gift (definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. past participle of gifta and gifte
Alternative forms
  • gifta

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta and gifte
  2. supine of gifta and gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ġyft

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *giftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian jeft, Old Saxon *gift (in sundargift (privilege, literally special gift)), Dutch gift, Old High German gift (German Gift), Old Norse gipt (> English gift), Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (fragifts).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jift/

Noun

ġift f (nominative plural ġifta)

  1. Payment for a wife.
  2. (in the plural) marriage, wedding

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: ȝift, ȝeft, gift (in part from Old Norse)
    • English: gift, yift
    • Scots: gyft, gift

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From German Gift.

Noun

gift n

  1. poison; venom; virus; toxin
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension
Related terms
  • giftig

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gipta (give away in marriage), from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. married
    ett gift par

    a married couple
    Han är gift sedan tre år.

    He’s been married for three years.
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta.
  2. past participle of gifta.
  3. supine of gifta.


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English given, from Old Norse gefa (to give), from Proto-Germanic *gebaną (to give). Merged with native Middle English yiven, ȝeven, from Old English ġiefan, from the same Proto-Germanic source (compare the obsolete inherited English doublet yive).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪv/
  • Rhymes: -ɪv

Verb

give (third-person singular simple present gives, present participle giving, simple past gave, past participle given)

  1. (ditransitive) To move, shift, provide something abstract or concrete to someone or something or somewhere.
    1. To transfer one’s possession or holding of (something) to (someone).
    2. To make a present or gift of.
    3. To pledge.
    4. To provide (something) to (someone), to allow or afford.
    5. To cause (a sensation or feeling) to exist in.
    6. To carry out (a physical interaction) with (something).
    7. To pass (something) into (someone’s hand, etc.).
    8. To cause (a disease or condition) in, or to transmit (a disease or condition) to.
  2. (ditransitive) To estimate or predict (a duration or probability) for (something).
  3. (intransitive) To yield slightly when a force is applied.
  4. (intransitive) To collapse under pressure or force.
  5. (transitive) To provide, as, a service or a broadcast.
    • 2003, Iain Aitken, Value-Driven IT Management: Commercializing the IT Function, page 153
      [] who did not have a culture in which ‘giving good presentation’ and successfully playing the internal political game was the way up.
    • 2006, Christopher Matthew Spencer The Ebay Entrepreneur, page 248
      A friendly voice on the phone welcoming prospective new clients is a must. Don’t underestimate the importance of giving good “phone”.
  6. (intransitive) To lead (onto or into).
  7. (transitive, dated) To provide a view of.
    His window gave the park.
  8. To exhibit as a product or result; to produce; to yield.
    The number of men, divided by the number of ships, gives four hundred to each ship.
  9. To cause; to make; used with the infinitive.
  10. To cause (someone) to have; produce in (someone); effectuate.
  11. To allow or admit by way of supposition; to concede.
    He can be bad-tempered, I’ll give you that, but he’s a hard worker.
  12. To attribute; to assign; to adjudge.
  13. To communicate or announce (advice, tidings, etc.); to pronounce or utter (an opinion, a judgment, a shout, etc.).
  14. (dated or religion) To grant power, permission, destiny, etc. (especially to a person); to allot; to allow.
  15. (reflexive) To devote or apply (oneself).
  16. (obsolete) To become soft or moist.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  17. (obsolete) To shed tears; to weep.
  18. (obsolete) To have a misgiving.
    • c. 1608-1634, John Webster, Appius and Virginia, page 16
      My mind gives ye’re reserv’d / To rob poor market women.
  19. (slang) To be going on, to be occurring
Usage notes
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb give had the form givest, and had gavest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form giveth was used.
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (transfer possession of): See Thesaurus:give
  • (bend slightly when a force is applied): bend, cede, flex, move, yield, split
  • (estimate or predict): estimate, guess, predict
  • (provide):
Antonyms
  • (transfer possession of): get, obtain, receive, take
  • (bend slightly when a force is applied): not bend/cede/flex/give/move/yield, resist
Derived terms

See also given, giver and giving

Translations

Noun

give (uncountable)

  1. The amount of bending that something undergoes when a force is applied to it; a tendency to yield under pressure; resilence.
    This chair doesn’t have much give.
    There is no give in his dogmatic religious beliefs.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

give (plural gives)

  1. Alternative form of gyve

References

  • give at OneLook Dictionary Search

Danish

Alternative forms

  • gi’ (representing the spoken language)

Etymology

From Old Norse gefa, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną, cognate with English give and German geben. The Germanic verbs goes back to Proto-Indo-European *gʰebʰ- (to give) (hence Sanskrit गभस्ति (gábhasti, arm)) rather than *gʰeh₁bʰ- (to grab) (hence Latin habeō (to have)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊iˀ], [ˈɡ̊i], (formal) IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊iːʋə]
  • Rhymes: -iː, -iːvɐ

Verb

give (imperative giv, present tense giver, past tense gav, past participle givet, c given, givne)

  1. to give

Conjugation

Derived terms


Swedish

Verb

give

  1. present subjunctive of giva

Anagrams

  • evig

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