gift vs present what difference

what is difference between gift and present

English

Alternative forms

  • yift (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English gift (also yift, yeft, ȝift, ȝeft), partly from Old English ġift (giving, consideration, dowry, wedding) and Old Norse gipt (gift, present, wedding); both from Proto-Germanic *giftiz (gift). Equivalent to give +‎ -th (etymologically yive + -th). Cognate with West Frisian jefte (gift), Saterland Frisian Gift (gift), German Low German Gift (poison), Dutch gift (gift) and its doublet gif (poison), German Gift (poison), Swedish gift (gift, poison, venom), Icelandic gift (gift). Doublet of yift.

Pronunciation

  • (US, UK) enPR: gĭft, IPA(key): /ɡɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift (plural gifts)

  1. Something given to another voluntarily, without charge.
  2. A talent or natural ability.
  3. Something gained incidentally, without effort.
  4. The act, right, or power of giving or bestowing.

Synonyms

  • (something freely given by another): See Thesaurus:gift For beneficial actions, see favor.
  • (something god-given): ability, aptitude, knack, talent, strength

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ギフト (gifuto)

Translations

See also

  • lagniappe

Verb

gift (third-person singular simple present gifts, present participle gifting, simple past and past participle gifted)

  1. (transitive) To give as a gift or donation.
  2. (transitive) To give away, to concede easily.

Synonyms

  • contribute
  • donate
  • give

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • T.G.I.F., TGIF

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡift/, [ɡ̊ifd̥]

Etymology 1

From German Gift (poison). Similar to the archaic gift (gift), a verbal noun to give (to give).

Noun

gift c (singular definite giften, plural indefinite gifte)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)
Inflection

Derived terms

See also

  • gift on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

Originally the past participle of gifte (marry).

Adjective

gift

  1. married
Inflection
Derived terms
  • ugift

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte
  2. past participle of gifte

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch gifte, from Old Dutch *gift, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz. The words gif and vergif, both meaning “poison”, derive from the same source as gift. The sense “poison” may have originated as a shortening of vergift or may have been borrowed from German Gift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɪft/
  • Hyphenation: gift
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. donation; something given (away) voluntarily.
    Synonyms: cadeau, geschenk, schenking
Derived terms
  • grafgift
  • huwelijksgift

Noun

gift n or f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. (dated) poison
    Synonyms: gif, venijn, vergif, vergift
Derived terms
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) poisonous, toxic, venomous
    Synonym: giftig

Inflection

Related terms

  • geven, gave
  • vergiftigen, ontgiften, begiftigen

Faroese

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, uncountable)

  1. poison

Declension

Synonyms

  • eitur

Adjective

gift

  1. married, female form of giftur
    • Ert tú gift?
      Are you (f) married?

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse gipt, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /cɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, nominative plural giftir)

  1. (obsolete) gift
    Synonym: gjöf

Declension

Related terms

  • gifta

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

gift f or m (definite singular gifta or giften, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)

Derived terms

  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Related terms

  • forgifte
  • forgiftning
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (neuter singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Antonyms

  • ugift

Derived terms

  • nygift

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪft/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gipt.

Noun

gift f (definite singular gifta, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison
Derived terms
  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Etymology 2

Past participle of gifta.

Adjective

gift (indefinite singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Participle

gift (definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. past participle of gifta and gifte
Alternative forms
  • gifta

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta and gifte
  2. supine of gifta and gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ġyft

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *giftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian jeft, Old Saxon *gift (in sundargift (privilege, literally special gift)), Dutch gift, Old High German gift (German Gift), Old Norse gipt (> English gift), Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (fragifts).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jift/

Noun

ġift f (nominative plural ġifta)

  1. Payment for a wife.
  2. (in the plural) marriage, wedding

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: ȝift, ȝeft, gift (in part from Old Norse)
    • English: gift, yift
    • Scots: gyft, gift

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From German Gift.

Noun

gift n

  1. poison; venom; virus; toxin
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension
Related terms
  • giftig

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gipta (give away in marriage), from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. married
    ett gift par

    a married couple
    Han är gift sedan tre år.

    He’s been married for three years.
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta.
  2. past participle of gifta.
  3. supine of gifta.


English

Alternative forms

  • præsent (archaic or pedantic)
  • (abbreviation, grammar): ps.

Pronunciation

  • (adjective, noun)
    • enPR: prĕzʹənt, IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛzənt/
    • Hyphenation: pres‧ent
    • Rhymes: -ɛzənt
  • (verb)
    • enPR: prĭzĕnt’, IPA(key): /pɹɪˈzɛnt/
    • (Canada) IPA(key): /pɹəˈzɛnt/
    • ,
    • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology 1

From Middle English present, from Old French present, from Latin praesent-, praesens present participle of praeesse (to be present), from Latin prae- (pre-) + esse (to be).

Adjective

present (comparative more present, superlative most present)

  1. Relating to now, for the time being; current.
    Up to the present day.
  2. Located in the immediate vicinity.
  3. (obsolete) Having an immediate effect (of a medicine, poison etc.); fast-acting. [16th-18th c.]
    • Amongſt this number of Cordials and Alteratiues, J doe not find a more preſent remedy, then a cup of wine, or ſtrong drinke, and if it be ſoberly and opportunely vſed.
  4. (obsolete) Not delayed; immediate; instant.
    • 1636, Philip Massinger, The Bashful Lover
      An ambassador [] desires a present audience.
  5. (dated) Ready; quick in emergency.
  6. (obsolete) Favorably attentive; propitious.
    • to find a god so present to my prayer
  7. Relating to something a person is referring to in the very context, with a deictic use similar to the demonstrative adjective this.
  8. Attentive; alert; focused.
Synonyms
  • (relating to now): current; see also Thesaurus:present
  • (in vicinity): close, nearby; see also Thesaurus:near
  • (having an immediate effect): presentaneous
  • (not delayed): instantaneous; see also Thesaurus:instantaneous
  • (attentive): audient, heedful, reckful
Antonyms
  • (relating to now): future, past
  • (in vicinity): absent
  • (having an immediate effect): slow-acting
  • (not delayed): delayed; see also Thesaurus:delayed
  • (attentive): distracted, inattentive
Derived terms
Related terms
  • presence
Translations

Noun

present (plural presents)

  1. The current moment or period of time.
  2. The present tense.
Synonyms
  • (current time): now; see also Thesaurus:the present
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin praesentāre (to show), from praesent-, praesens, present participle of praeesse (be in front of).

Noun

present (plural presents)

  1. A gift, especially one given for birthdays, Christmas, anniversaries, graduations, weddings, or any other special occasions.
  2. (military) The position of a soldier in presenting arms.
Descendants
  • Japanese: プレゼント (purezento)
Translations

Verb

present (third-person singular simple present presents, present participle presenting, simple past and past participle presented)

  1. To bring (someone) into the presence of (a person); to introduce formally. [from 14th c.]
    to present an envoy to the king
  2. (transitive) To nominate (a member of the clergy) for an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) To offer (a problem, complaint) to a court or other authority for consideration. [from 14th c.]
  4. (transitive, now rare) To charge (a person) with a crime or accusation; to bring before court. [from 14th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, page 71:
      In the diocese of Gloucester in 1548 two inhabitants of Slimbridge were presented for saying that holy oil was ‘of no virtue but meet to grease sheep’.
  5. (reflexive) To come forward, appear in a particular place or before a particular person, especially formally. [from 14th c.]
  6. (transitive) To put (something) forward in order for it to be seen; to show, exhibit. [from 14th c.]
    • 2020, NFL rule 7 section 4 article 7[1]:
      Note: The offensive team must present a legal formation both before and after a shift.
  7. (transitive) To make clear to one’s mind or intelligence; to put forward for consideration. [from 14th c.]
    • 1927, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case-book of Sherlock Holmes:
      I do begin to realize that the matter must be presented in such a way as may interest the reader.
  8. (transitive) To put on, stage (a play etc.). [from 16th c.]
    The theater is proud to present the Fearless Fliers.
  9. (transitive, military) To point (a firearm) at something, to hold (a weapon) in a position ready to fire. [from 16th c.]
  10. (reflexive) To offer oneself for mental consideration; to occur to the mind. [from 16th c.]
    Well, one idea does present itself.
  11. (intransitive, medicine) To come to the attention of medical staff, especially with a specific symptom. [from 19th c.]
    The patient presented with insomnia.
  12. (intransitive, medicine) To appear (in a specific way) for delivery (of a fetus); to appear first at the mouth of the uterus during childbirth. [from 18th c.]
  13. (intransitive, with “as”) To appear or represent oneself (as having a certain gender).
    At that time, Elbe was presenting as a man.
  14. (transitive) To act as presenter on (a radio, television programme etc.). [from 20th c.]
    Anne Robinson presents “The Weakest Link”.
  15. (transitive) To give a gift or presentation to (someone). [from 14th c.]
    She was presented with an honorary degree for her services to entertainment.
  16. (transitive) To give (a gift or presentation) to someone; to bestow. [from 14th c.]
    • 1801, William Cowper, The Vicissitudes Experienced in the Christian Life
      My last, least offering, I present thee now.
  17. (transitive) To deliver (something abstract) as though as a gift; to offer. [from 14th c.]
    I presented my compliments to Lady Featherstoneshaw.
  18. (transitive) To hand over (a bill etc.) to be paid. [from 15th c.]
  19. (intransitive, zoology) To display one’s female genitalia in a way that signals to others that one is ready for copulation. Also referred to as lordosis behaviour. [from 20th c.]
Derived terms
  • present arms
Translations

Further reading

  • present in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • present in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • present at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Serpent, penster, repents, respent, serpent

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin praesens, attested from the 13th century.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /pɾəˈzent/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /pɾəˈzen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /pɾeˈzent/

Noun

present m (plural presents)

  1. present (current moment or period of time)
  2. (grammar) present (grammatical tense)

Adjective

present (masculine and feminine plural presents)

  1. present (at a given location)

Derived terms

  • tenir present

References

Further reading

  • “present” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “present” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “present” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology

From French présent, from présenter (to present).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /prɛsanɡ/, [pʰʁ̥ɛˈsɑŋ]

Noun

present c (singular definite presenten, plural indefinite presenter)

  1. (dated) present, gift
    Synonym: gave

Inflection


Ladin

Alternative forms

  • prejent, presënt

Adjective

present m (feminine singular presenta, masculine plural presenc, feminine plural presentes)

  1. present

Middle French

Noun

present m (plural presens)

  1. gift; present
    • 1417, La disputation de l’Asne contre frere Anselme Turmeda [3]
      Un iour qu’il alloit par ladite cité & passant p[ar] la rue de la mer, veit une guenon dedans un panier & l’acheta pour en faire un present audit conte d’Armignac son parent, pource que en France i’a pas beaucoup de telz animaux.

      One day as he was walking through said city and passing through la Rue de Mer, he saw an Old World monkey in a basket and bought it to give it as a present to the Count of Armignac, his father, because there are not many animals like this one in France.
  2. (grammar) present (tense)

Old French

Noun

present m (oblique plural presenz or presentz, nominative singular presenz or presentz, nominative plural present)

  1. gift; present
  2. (grammar) present (tense)

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /preˈsent/

Noun

present c

  1. gift, present

Declension

Synonyms

  • gåva, klapp

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