gift vs talent what difference

what is difference between gift and talent

English

Alternative forms

  • yift (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English gift (also yift, yeft, ȝift, ȝeft), partly from Old English ġift (giving, consideration, dowry, wedding) and Old Norse gipt (gift, present, wedding); both from Proto-Germanic *giftiz (gift). Equivalent to give +‎ -th (etymologically yive + -th). Cognate with West Frisian jefte (gift), Saterland Frisian Gift (gift), German Low German Gift (poison), Dutch gift (gift) and its doublet gif (poison), German Gift (poison), Swedish gift (gift, poison, venom), Icelandic gift (gift). Doublet of yift.

Pronunciation

  • (US, UK) enPR: gĭft, IPA(key): /ɡɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift (plural gifts)

  1. Something given to another voluntarily, without charge.
  2. A talent or natural ability.
  3. Something gained incidentally, without effort.
  4. The act, right, or power of giving or bestowing.

Synonyms

  • (something freely given by another): See Thesaurus:gift For beneficial actions, see favor.
  • (something god-given): ability, aptitude, knack, talent, strength

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ギフト (gifuto)

Translations

See also

  • lagniappe

Verb

gift (third-person singular simple present gifts, present participle gifting, simple past and past participle gifted)

  1. (transitive) To give as a gift or donation.
  2. (transitive) To give away, to concede easily.

Synonyms

  • contribute
  • donate
  • give

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • T.G.I.F., TGIF

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡift/, [ɡ̊ifd̥]

Etymology 1

From German Gift (poison). Similar to the archaic gift (gift), a verbal noun to give (to give).

Noun

gift c (singular definite giften, plural indefinite gifte)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)
Inflection

Derived terms

See also

  • gift on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

Originally the past participle of gifte (marry).

Adjective

gift

  1. married
Inflection
Derived terms
  • ugift

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte
  2. past participle of gifte

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch gifte, from Old Dutch *gift, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz. The words gif and vergif, both meaning “poison”, derive from the same source as gift. The sense “poison” may have originated as a shortening of vergift or may have been borrowed from German Gift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɪft/
  • Hyphenation: gift
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. donation; something given (away) voluntarily.
    Synonyms: cadeau, geschenk, schenking
Derived terms
  • grafgift
  • huwelijksgift

Noun

gift n or f (plural giften, diminutive giftje n)

  1. (dated) poison
    Synonyms: gif, venijn, vergif, vergift
Derived terms
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) poisonous, toxic, venomous
    Synonym: giftig

Inflection

Related terms

  • geven, gave
  • vergiftigen, ontgiften, begiftigen

Faroese

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, uncountable)

  1. poison

Declension

Synonyms

  • eitur

Adjective

gift

  1. married, female form of giftur
    • Ert tú gift?
      Are you (f) married?

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse gipt, from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /cɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

gift f (genitive singular giftar, nominative plural giftir)

  1. (obsolete) gift
    Synonym: gjöf

Declension

Related terms

  • gifta

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

gift f or m (definite singular gifta or giften, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison (substance harmful to a living organism)

Derived terms

  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Related terms

  • forgifte
  • forgiftning
  • giftig

Adjective

gift (neuter singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Antonyms

  • ugift

Derived terms

  • nygift

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪft/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gipt.

Noun

gift f (definite singular gifta, indefinite plural gifter, definite plural giftene)

  1. poison
Derived terms
  • giftslange
  • giftstoff
  • rottegift

Etymology 2

Past participle of gifta.

Adjective

gift (indefinite singular gift, definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. married

Participle

gift (definite singular and plural gifte)

  1. past participle of gifta and gifte
Alternative forms
  • gifta

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta and gifte
  2. supine of gifta and gifte

References

  • “gift” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ġyft

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *giftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian jeft, Old Saxon *gift (in sundargift (privilege, literally special gift)), Dutch gift, Old High German gift (German Gift), Old Norse gipt (> English gift), Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (fragifts).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jift/

Noun

ġift f (nominative plural ġifta)

  1. Payment for a wife.
  2. (in the plural) marriage, wedding

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: ȝift, ȝeft, gift (in part from Old Norse)
    • English: gift, yift
    • Scots: gyft, gift

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From German Gift.

Noun

gift n

  1. poison; venom; virus; toxin
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension
Related terms
  • giftig

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gipta (give away in marriage), from Proto-Germanic *giftiz.

Adjective

gift (not comparable)

  1. married
    ett gift par

    a married couple
    Han är gift sedan tre år.

    He’s been married for three years.
    • 1968 Tove Jansson, Muminpappans memoarer, Holger Schildts Förlag (1991), →ISBN, page 126:
      Rådd-djuret gråter, sade Joxaren förebrående. Spöket har målat en dödskalle på kaffeburken och skrivit GIFT under och nu är Rådd-djuret utom sig och säger att har det inte gift sig förut så kommer det nu absolut aldrig att göra det!

      “The Muddler is crying,” said the Joxter reproachfully. “The ghost has painted a skull and crossbones and the word POISON on the Muddler’s coffee tin, and now the Muddler is beside himself and says that if it has not gotten married before it will absolutely never do it!”
Declension

Verb

gift

  1. imperative of gifta.
  2. past participle of gifta.
  3. supine of gifta.


English

Etymology

From Middle English talent, from Old English talente, borrowed from the plural of Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent). Compare Old High German talenta (talent). Later senses from Old French talent (talent, will, inclination, desire).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtælənt/
  • (UK, also) IPA(key): /ˈtalənt/
  • Hyphenation: tal‧ent

Noun

talent (plural talents)

  1. A marked natural ability or skill. [from 15thc.]
  2. (historical) A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East. [from 9thc.]
    • 1611, Authorized Version, Matthew XXV 14-15:
      For the kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods. And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.
  3. (obsolete) A desire or inclination for something. [14th-16thc.]
  4. (business, media, sports) People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person. [from 19thc.]
  5. (slang) The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness. [from 20thc.]

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:skill

Derived terms

  • talent scout

Translations

Further reading

  • talent in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • talent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • antlet, latent, latten

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /təˈlent/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /təˈlen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /taˈlent/

Noun

talent m (plural talents)

  1. talent (Greek money)
  2. talent (skill)
  3. hunger
    Synonym: gana

Derived terms

  • atalentat
  • talentós

Further reading

  • “talent” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Noun

talent m

  1. talent (unit of weight)
  2. talent (actual or potential ability)

Synonyms

  • (ability): nadání n

Related terms

  • talentovaný

Further reading

  • talent in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • talent in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from German Talent (talent), from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

Noun

talent n (singular definite talentet, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (potential or factual ability to perform a skill better than most people)
Inflection
See also
  • talent on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

From Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

Noun

talent c (singular definite talenten, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (unit of weight and money)
Inflection

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch talent, from Old French talent, from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, a particular weight, balance), from Proto-Indo-European *tl̥h₂ent-, from *telh₂-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːˈlɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

talent n (plural talenten, diminutive talentje n)

  1. talent (gift, quality, capability)
  2. (historical) talent (ancient weight, value of money or coin)

Derived terms

  • met zijn talenten woekeren
  • natuurtalent
  • talentenjacht
  • talentvol

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: talent

Anagrams

  • latten

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ta.lɑ̃/

Noun

talent m (plural talents)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece) a talent (an obsolete unit of weight or money)
  2. a talent, a gift, a knack

Derived terms

  • talentueux

Further reading

  • “talent” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • latent

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • taland, talande, talant, talente (all rare)

Etymology

From Old French talent and Old English talente, both from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taˈlɛnt/, /ˈtalɛnt/

Noun

talent (plural talentes or talens)

  1. A talent (ancient unit of money or weight)
  2. Will, inclination, or desire.
  3. A base inclination or urge (especially lustful or for food)
  4. An emotion or feeling (especially positive or affectionate)
  5. A purpose; a plan or idea serving one.
  6. (rare) Capacity, character, or nature.
  7. (rare) A talent (ability, skill).

Related terms

  • maltalent

Descendants

  • English: talent
  • Scots: talent

References

  • “talent, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin talentum.

Noun

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent or talenter, definite plural talenta or talentene)

  1. (a) talent

Derived terms

  • talentfull

References

  • “talent” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin talentum

Noun

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent, definite plural talenta)

  1. (a) talent

Derived terms

  • talentfull

References

  • “talent” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • talant

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

Noun

talent m (oblique plural talenz or talentz, nominative singular talenz or talentz, nominative plural talent)

  1. desire; wish (to do something)

Descendants

  • Middle English: talent, taland, talande, talant, talente (in part)
    • English: talent
    • Scots: talent

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈta.lɛnt/

Noun

talent m inan

  1. talent, gift
  2. (historical) talent (ancient unit of weight and money)

Declension

Noun

talent m pers

  1. (metonymically) talented person

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From French talente

Noun

talent n (plural talente)

  1. talent

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • (Bosnian, Serbian): tàlenat

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tǎlent/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lent

Noun

tàlent m (Cyrillic spelling та̀лент)

  1. (Croatia) talent

Declension


Welsh

Alternative forms

  • talen (colloquial)

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /ˈtalɛnt/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈtaːlɛnt/, /ˈtalɛnt/

Etymology 1

talu +‎ -ent

Verb

talent

  1. (literary) third-person plural imperfect/conditional of talu

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Noun

talent m (plural talentau or talenti or talennau)

  1. ability, aptitude
  2. talent (coin)

Derived terms

  • talentog (talented)

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “talent”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

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