gigantic vs mammoth what difference

what is difference between gigantic and mammoth

English

Alternative forms

  • gigantick (obsolete)

Etymology

From Ancient Greek γιγαντικός (gigantikós), ultimately from γίγας (gígas, giant). According to the Poly-Olbion project coined by Michael Drayton in 1612.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jī-găn’tĭk, IPA(key): /dʒaɪˈɡæntɪk/
  • Rhymes: -æntɪk

Adjective

gigantic (comparative more gigantic, superlative most gigantic)

  1. Very large.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 1 p. 1[1]:
      Thou Genius of the place (this most renowned Ile)
      Which livedst long before the All-earth-drowning Flood,
      Whilst yet the world did swarme with her Gigantick brood;
  2. In the manner of a giant.

Synonyms

  • gigantesque
  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Derived terms

  • gigantism

Related terms

  • giant

Translations


Romanian

Etymology

gigant +‎ -ic

Adjective

gigantic m or n (feminine singular gigantică, masculine plural gigantici, feminine and neuter plural gigantice)

  1. giant

Declension



English

Etymology

From obsolete Russian ма́мант (mámant), modern ма́монт (mámont), probably from a Uralic language, such as Proto-Mansi *mē̮ŋ-ońt (earth-horn). Compare Northern Mansi ма̄ (, earth), а̄ньт (ānʹt, horn). Adjectival use was popularized in the early 1800s by references to the Cheshire Mammoth Cheese presented to American paleontologist and president Thomas Jefferson.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmæməθ/

Noun

mammoth (plural mammoths)

  1. Any species of the extinct genus Mammuthus, of large, usually hairy, elephant-like mammals with long curved tusks and an inclined back, which became extinct with the last retreat of ice age glaciers during the late Pleistocene period, and are known from fossils, frozen carcasses, and Paleolithic cave paintings found in North America and Eurasia.
  2. (obsolete) A mastodon.
  3. (figuratively) Something very large of its kind.
    • 1973, Jeffrey Potter, Disaster by Oil (page 46)
      That is a lot of ship, about the size of big tankers before they grew so rapidly to become supers, mammoths and oilbergs.

Translations

Descendants

  • Arabic: مَامُوث(māmūṯ)
  • Hebrew: מָמוּתָה(mamúta)
  • Hindi: मैमथ (maimath)
  • Japanese: マンモス (manmosu)
  • Khmer: ម៉ាមម៉ូត (maammout)
  • Korean: 매머드 (maemeodeu)
  • Thai: แมมมอธ (mɛm-mɔ́ɔt)

Adjective

mammoth (comparative more mammoth, superlative most mammoth)

  1. Comparable to a mammoth in its size; very large, huge, gigantic.
    • 1898, Guy Wetmore Carryl, The Arrogant Frog and the Superior Bull, in Fables for the Frivolous (With Apologies to La Fontaine),
      “Ha! ha!” he proudly cried, “a fig / For this, your mammoth torso! / Just watch me while I grow as big / As you—or even more so!”
    • 1999, Albert Isaac Slomovitz, The Fighting Rabbis: Jewish Military Chaplains and American History, New York University Press, page 103.

Synonyms

  • (very large): colossal, enormous, gigantic, huge, titanic
  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • mammoth on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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