giggle vs titter what difference

what is difference between giggle and titter

English

Etymology

Unknown. Perhaps a frequentative based on dialectal English gig (to creak), from Middle English gigen (to make a creaking sound) +‎ -le. Compare Middle English gigge, gige (a squeaking sound; a creak), Dutch giechelen, German kichern.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɪɡl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡəl

Verb

giggle (third-person singular simple present giggles, present participle giggling, simple past and past participle giggled)

  1. To laugh gently in a nervous or affected manner.
    The jokes had them giggling like little girls all evening.

Synonyms

  • (laugh in a silly way): titter
  • See also Thesaurus:laugh

Derived terms

  • giggly

Translations

Noun

giggle (plural giggles)

  1. A high-pitched, silly laugh.
  2. (informal) Fun; an amusing episode.
    We put itching powder down his shirt for giggles.
    The women thought it would be quite a giggle to have a strippergram at the bride’s hen party.

Synonyms

  • (laugh): titter
  • (amusement): amusement, fun, a joke, a laugh or laughs

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtɪtɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtə(r)

Etymology 1

First attested in the 1610s. Probably from Middle English *titeren, *titren (attested in Middle English titering (hesitation, vacillation)), probably a frequentative of Middle English titten (to waver), related to Old Norse titra (to shake, shiver, quiver), dialectal Swedish tittra (to snicker).

Verb

titter (third-person singular simple present titters, present participle tittering, simple past and past participle tittered)

  1. To laugh or giggle in a somewhat subdued or restrained way, as from nervousness or poorly-suppressed amusement.
    • 1863, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Tales of a Wayside Inn Part First: The Sicilian’s Tale – King Robert of Sicily
      A group of tittering pages ran before.
  2. (obsolete) To teeter; to seesaw.
Synonyms
  • snicker; see also Thesaurus:laugh
Derived terms
  • tittersome
Translations

Noun

titter (plural titters)

  1. A nervous or somewhat repressed giggle.
    • April 21, 1811, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
      There was a titter of [] delight on his countenance.
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably related to tit, titty.

Noun

titter (plural titters)

  1. (slang, vulgar, chiefly in the plural) A woman’s breast.
    • 2013, Dorothy St. James, Oak and Dagger, Berkley Prime Crime (2013), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      “The poor dear, even her titters are weighted down with melancholy,” Pearle said to Mable.
      “I don’t know what you’re talking about. Her titters look perky enough to me,” Mable replied.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:titter.
Synonyms
  • (a woman’s breast): See also Thesaurus:breasts.

References


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