gild vs order what difference

what is difference between gild and order

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English gilden, gulden, from Old English gyldan (to gild, to cover with a thin layer of gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþijaną, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪld/
  • Rhymes: -ɪld
  • Homophones: gilled, guild

Verb

gild (third-person singular simple present gilds, present participle gilding, simple past and past participle gilded or gilt)

  1. (transitive) To cover with a thin layer of gold; to cover with gold leaf.
  2. (transitive) To adorn.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene vi[1]:
      I will make fast the doors, and gild myself / With some more ducats, and be with you straight.
  3. (transitive, cooking) To decorate with a golden surface appearance.
    • 2008, Ivan P. Day, Cooking in Europe, 1650-1850 (page 98)
      Gild the entire outside with beaten egg yolk, and sprinkle it with grated parmesan.
  4. (transitive) To give a bright or pleasing aspect to.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 28:
      When sparkling stars twire not, thou gild’st the even.
  5. (transitive) To make appear drunk.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

gild (plural gilds)

  1. Obsolete form of guild.
    • 1920, H. E. Salter, Munimenta Civitatis Oxonie (volume 71, page xxviii)
      No trade gild might be started without the consent of the whole body of hanasters, who would insist that the regulations were not harmful to the burgesses as a whole; []

See also

  • gild on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • DILG, glid

Gothic

Romanization

gild

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Irish

Etymology

From English guild.

Noun

gild m (genitive singular gild, nominative plural gildeanna)

  1. (historical) guild
    Synonym: cuallacht

Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • “gild” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • “guild” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • Entries containing “gild” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse gildr, from Proto-Germanic *gildiz. Cognates include Icelandic gildur and Scots yauld.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪlː/ (example of pronunciation)

Adjective

gild (masculine and feminine gild, neuter gildt, definite singular and plural gilde, comparative gildare, indefinite superlative gildast, definite superlative gildaste)

  1. (also law) valid
    Antonym: ugild
  2. nice, healthy, rich, capable
  3. kind, good
  4. enjoyable
  5. happy
  6. proud

Derived terms

  • gilda (verb)

Related terms

  • gilde n
  • gjelda

References

  • “gild” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ġeld, ġield, ġyld

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *geldą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jild/, [jiɫd]

Noun

ġild n

  1. payment of money; tribute, compensation, tax
  2. guild, society, club
  3. deity
  4. visible object of worship; idol

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Middle English: geld
    • English: geld (reinforced by Latin)
  • Middle English: ȝeld
    • English: yield
    • Scots: ȝeld, ȝeild
  • Medieval Latin: geldum, gildum

References

  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “ġild”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Old Norse

Adjective

gild

  1. strong feminine nominative singular of gildr
  2. strong neuter nominative plural of gildr
  3. strong neuter accusative plural of gildr


English

Alternative forms

  • ordre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ordre, from Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom), from Proto-Italic *ored-, *oreð- (to arrange), of unknown origin. Related to Latin ōrdior (begin, literally begin to weave). In sense “request for purchase”, compare bespoke. Doublet of ordo.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɔːdə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹdɚ/, [ˈɔɹɾɚ]
  • (Indian English) IPA(key): /ˈɔːdə(r)/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)də(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: or‧der

Noun

order (countable and uncountable, plural orders)

  1. (countable) Arrangement, disposition, or sequence.
  2. (countable) A position in an arrangement, disposition, or sequence.
    • 1897, T. L. Heath (translator), Eutocius of Ascalon, Extract from a commentary by Eutocius, quoted in 1897 [CUP], T. L. Heath (editor), The Works of Archimedes, 2002, Dover, unnumbered page,
      His attempt I shall also give in its order.
  3. (uncountable) The state of being well arranged.
  4. (countable) Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.
  5. (countable) A command.
  6. (countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
  7. (countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles.
  8. (countable) An association of knights.
  9. Any group of people with common interests.
  10. (countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.
  11. (countable, biology, taxonomy) A category in the classification of organisms, ranking below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.
  12. A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      They are in equal order to their several ends.
    • 1726, George Granville, The British Enchanters
      Various orders various ensigns bear.
    • [] which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime.
  13. (Christianity) An ecclesiastical rank or position, usually for the sake of ministry, (especially, when plural) holy orders.
  14. (architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (since the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural design.
  15. (cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.
  16. (electronics) A power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  17. (chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.
  18. (set theory) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set, group, or other structure regardable as a set.
    • 1911 [Cambridge University Press], William Burnside, Theory of Groups of Finite Order, 2nd Edition, Reprint, Dover (Dover Phoenix), 2004, page 222,
      In this case, the conjugate set contains n(n − 1)/x(x − 1) distinct sub-groups of order m, and H is therefore self-conjugate in a group K of order x(x − l)m.
    • 2000, Michael Aschbacher, Finite Group Theory, Cambridge University Press, 2nd Edition, page 260,
      For various reasons it turns out to be better to enlarge this set of invariants to include suitable normalizers of subgroups of odd prime order.
  19. (group theory, of an element of a group) For given group G and element gG, the smallest positive natural number n, if it exists, such that (using multiplicative notation), gn = e, where e is the identity element of G; if no such number exists, the element is said to be of infinite order (or sometimes zero order).
    • 1997, Frank Celler, C. R. Leedham-Green, Calculating the Order of an Invertible Matrix, Larry Finkelstein, William M. Kantor (editors), Groups and Computation II, American Mathematical Society, page 55,
      The object of this note is to observe that it is possible to calculate the order of an element




      A


      {\displaystyle A}

      of




      G
      =


      G
      L


      (
      d
      ,
      q
      )


      {\displaystyle G={\mathit {GL}}(d,q)}

      on average using




      O
      (

      d

      3




      l
      o
      g


       
      q
      )


      {\displaystyle O(d^{3}{\mathsf {log}}\ q)}

      field operations, assuming that





      q

      i



      1


      {\displaystyle q^{i}-1}

      has been factorised for




      i

      d


      {\displaystyle i\leq d}

      .

    • 1999, A. Ehrenfeucht, T. Harju, G. Rozenberg, The Theory of 2-structures, World Scientific, page 15,
      If




      Δ


      {\displaystyle \Delta }

      is a finite group, its cardinality is called the order of




      Δ


      {\displaystyle \Delta }

      . The order of an element




      a

      Δ


      {\displaystyle a\in \Delta }

      is defined as the smallest nonnegative integer




      n


      {\displaystyle n}

      such that





      a

      n


      =

      1

      Δ




      {\displaystyle a^{n}=1_{\Delta }}

      . The second case of the following result is known as Cauchy’s theorem.

      Theorem 1.10 Let




      Δ


      {\displaystyle \Delta }

      be a finite group.

      (i) The order of an element




      a

      Δ


      {\displaystyle a\in \Delta }

      divides the order





      |

      Δ

      |



      {\displaystyle |\Delta |}

      of the group.

      (ii) If a prime number




      p


      {\displaystyle p}

      divides





      |

      Δ

      |



      {\displaystyle |\Delta |}

      , then there exists an element




      a

      Δ


      {\displaystyle a\in \Delta }

      of order




      p


      {\displaystyle p}

      .

    • 2010, A. R. Vasishta, A. K. Vasishta, Modern Algebra, Krishna Prakashan Media, 60th Edition, page 180,
      Since in a finite group the order of an element must be a divisor of the order of the group, therefore o (a) cannot be 3 and so we must have o (a)=4=the order of the group G.
  20. (graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.
  21. (order theory) A partially ordered set.
  22. (order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it is, in fact, a partially ordered set.
  23. (algebra) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.
  24. (finance) A written direction to furnish someone with money or property; compare money order, postal order.
    • 1763, James Boswell, in Gordon Turnbull (ed.), London Journal 1762–1763, Penguin 2014, p. 233:
      I then walked to Cochrane’s & got an order on Sir Charles Asgill for my money.

Quotations

  • 1611, Bible, King James Version, Luke, 1:i:
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us [] .
  • 1973, Donald Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, Addison-Wesley, chapter 8:
    Since only two of our tape drives were in working order, I was ordered to order more tape units in short order, in order to order the data several orders of magnitude faster.

Synonyms

  • (taxonomy): ordo

Antonyms

  • chaos

Hypernyms

  • denomination

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Glossary of order theory

Further reading

  • order on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Order (group theory) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Cauchy’s theorem (group theory) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Lagrange’s theorem (group theory) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • (taxonomy): Taxonomic rank#Ranks in botany on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

order (third-person singular simple present orders, present participle ordering, simple past and past participle ordered)

  1. (transitive) To set in some sort of order.
  2. (transitive) To arrange, set in proper order.
  3. (transitive) To issue a command to.
  4. (transitive) To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.
  5. To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.
    • persons presented to be ordered deacons

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (arrange into some sort of order): sort, rank
  • (issue a command): command

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

  • ordain
  • orderly
  • ordinal
  • ordinary

Anagrams

  • Doerr, Roder, derro, ordre

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French ordre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔr.dər/
  • Hyphenation: or‧der

Noun

order m or f or n (plural orders)

  1. order (command)
  2. order (request for product or service)

Derived terms

  • dagorder
  • legerorder
  • orderbrief
  • postorder

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: order
  • Papiamentu: òrdu, order

German

Verb

order

  1. inflection of ordern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch order, from from Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom). Doublet of orde and ordo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɔr.dər]
  • Hyphenation: or‧dêr

Noun

ordêr (first-person possessive orderku, second-person possessive ordermu, third-person possessive ordernya)

  1. order,
    1. a command.
    2. a request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
      Synonym: pesanan

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “order” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Polish

Etymology

From Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔr.dɛr/

Noun

order m inan (diminutive orderek, augmentative orderzysko)

  1. order (decoration awarded by government or other authority)
    Synonym: odznaczenie

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verbs) orderować, uorderować, wyorderować
  • (nouns) orderowiec, orderomania
  • (adjective) orderowy

Related terms

  • (noun) ordereczek

Further reading

  • order in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • order in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔrdɛr/

Noun

order c

  1. an order; a command
  2. an order; a request for some product or service

Declension

Hyponyms

See also

  • orden

Anagrams

  • roder

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