gilded vs specious what difference

what is difference between gilded and specious

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɪldɪd/

Verb

gilded

  1. simple past tense and past participle of gild

Adjective

gilded

  1. Having the color or quality of gold.
  2. Made of gold or covered by a thin layer of gold.
  3. Having a falsely pleasant appearance; sugarcoated.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II Scene 7
      All that glisters is not gold;
      Often have you heard that told:
      Many a man his life hath sold
      But my outside to behold:
      Gilded tombs do worms infold.
      Had you been as wise as bold,
      Young in limbs, in judgement old,
      Your answer had not been inscroll’d:
      Fare you well; your suit is cold.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • glided


English

Etymology

From Latin speciōsus (good-looking).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈspiːʃəs/
  • Rhymes: -iːʃəs

Adjective

specious (comparative more specious, superlative most specious)

  1. Seemingly well-reasoned, plausible or true, but actually fallacious.
    Synonyms: fallacious, insincere
    • 1649, John Milton, Eikonoklastes:
      now to the discourse itself, voluble enough, and full of sentence, but that, for the most part, either specious rather than solid, or to his cause nothing pertinent.
  2. Employing fallacious but deceptively plausible arguments; deceitful.
    • 1829, William Phelan, Mortimer O’Sullivan, Ireland: A digest taken before Select Committees of the two Houses of Parliament, appointed to inquire into the State of Ireland, 1824—25, in The Christian Review and Clerical Magazine, Volume III, page 472,
      But a third cause of the delusion is, that the Church of Rome has become more specious and deceitful than before the Reformation.
  3. Having an attractive appearance intended to generate a favorable response; deceptively attractive.
    Synonyms: meretricious, pretextual
    • 1760, William Warburton, The Lord Bishop of Gloucester’s Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable the House of Lords, January 30, 1760, page 19,
      And could any thing be more ſpecious, or more equal, than that fair diſtribution of power and profit, which men called the NEW MODEL?
    • 1788, Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 59
      This argument, though specious, will not, upon examination, be found solid.
  4. (obsolete) Beautiful, pleasing to look at.

Derived terms

  • specious present
  • specious tiger (Asota speciosa, a species of moth)

Related terms

  • speciosity
  • speciously
  • speciousness

Translations

See also

  • spurious

Anagrams

  • cosies up

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