gimcrack vs loud what difference

what is difference between gimcrack and loud

English

Alternative forms

  • jimcrack

Etymology

Unknown

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɪmkɹæk/

Adjective

gimcrack (not comparable)

  1. Showy but of poor quality; worthless.

Noun

gimcrack (plural gimcracks)

  1. Something showy but worthless; a gimmick or bauble.
    • 1847–1848, William Thackeray, Vanity Fair:
      [] he came home to find [] honest Swartz in her favourite amber-coloured satin, with turquoise bracelets, countless rings, flowers, feathers, and all sorts of tags and gimcracks, about as elegantly decorated as a she chimney-sweep on May-day.

Derived terms

  • gimcrackery

Verb

gimcrack (third-person singular simple present gimcracks, present participle gimcracking, simple past and past participle gimcracked)

  1. (transitive) To put together quickly and without much care; to bodge.
  2. (transitive) To embellish with gimcracks.


English

Alternative forms

  • lowd (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: loud, IPA(key): /laʊd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English loude, loud, lud, from Old English hlūd (loud, noisy, sounding, sonorous), from Proto-West Germanic *hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, *hlūþaz (heard), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewtos (heard, famous), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (to hear). More at listen.

Adjective

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. (of a sound) Of great intensity.
  2. (of a person, thing, event, etc.) Noisy.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Proverbs vii. 11
      She is loud and stubborn.
  3. (of a person, event, etc.) Not subtle or reserved, brash.
  4. (of clothing, decorations, etc.) Having unpleasantly and tastelessly contrasting colours or patterns; gaudy.
  5. (of marijuana, slang) High-quality; premium; (by extension) having a strong or pungent odour indicating good quality
Synonyms
  • (of clothing, etc): garish, gaudy
Antonyms
  • (sound): quiet, soft
  • (person): quiet
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

loud (countable and uncountable, plural louds)

  1. (colloquial) A loud sound or part of a sound.
    • 2012, Sam McGuire, Paul Lee, The Video Editor’s Guide to Soundtrack Pro (page 103)
      The expander doesn’t really make the louds louder and the softs softer in one step []
  2. (slang, uncountable) High-quality marijuana.
See also
  • dank

Etymology 2

From Middle English loude, from Old English hlūde (loudly), from Proto-Germanic *hlūda, *hlūdô (loudly), related to Etymology 1.

Adverb

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. Loudly.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, Act II, Scene 4,[1]
      Who knocks so loud at door?
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume 2, Book 7, Chapter 14, pp. 71-72,[2]
      Unluckily that worthy Officer having, in a literal Sense, taken his Fill of Liquor, had been some Time retired to his Bolster, where he was snoaring so loud, that it was not easy to convey a Noise in at his Ears capable of drowning that which issued from his Nostrils.

Anagrams

  • Ludo, ludo, ludo-, ould

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hlūd.

Adjective

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loud)

Etymology 2

From Old English hlūde.

Adverb

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loudly)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial