gin vs snare what difference

what is difference between gin and snare

English

Etymology 1

Abbreviation of geneva, alteration of Dutch genever (juniper) from Old French genevre (French genièvre), from Latin iūniperus (juniper). Hence gin rummy (first attested 1941).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĭn, IPA(key): /dʒɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: djinn

Noun

gin (countable and uncountable, plural gins)

  1. A colourless non-aged alcoholic liquor made by distilling fermented grains such as barley, corn, oats or rye with juniper berries; the base for many cocktails.
  2. (uncountable) Gin rummy.
  3. (poker) Drawing the best card or combination of cards.
Derived terms
  • bathtub gin
  • gin joint
  • gin pennant
  • sloe gin
Related terms
  • genever
  • juniper
Translations
References
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “gin”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • gin in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Etymology 2

Partly from Middle English gin, ginne (cleverness, scheme, talent, device, machine), from Old French gin, an aphetism of Old French engin (engine); and partly from Middle English grin, grine (snare, trick, stratagem, deceit, temptation, noose, halter, instrument), from Old English grin, gryn, giren, geren (snare, gin, noose).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĭn, IPA(key): /dʒɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: djinn

Noun

gin (plural gins)

  1. (obsolete) A trick; a device or instrument.
  2. (obsolete) A scheme; contrivance; artifice; a figurative trap or snare.
  3. A snare or trap for game.
  4. A machine for raising or moving heavy objects, consisting of a tripod formed of poles united at the top, with a windlass, pulleys, ropes, etc.
  5. (mining) A hoisting drum, usually vertical; a whim.
  6. A pile driver.
  7. A windpump.
  8. A cotton gin.
  9. An instrument of torture worked with screws.

Translations

Related terms
  • (cotton gin): ginner, ginnery

Verb

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past and past participle ginned)

  1. (transitive) To remove the seeds from cotton with a cotton gin.
  2. (transitive) To trap something in a gin.
Derived terms
  • gin up
Descendants
  • Italian: ginnare
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English ginnen (to begin), contraction of beginnen, from Old English beginnan, from Proto-Germanic *biginnaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪn/

Verb

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past gan, past participle gun)

  1. (archaic) To begin.

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Dharug dyin (woman), but having acquired a derogatory tone.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĭn, IPA(key): /dʒɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: djinn

Noun

gin (plural gins)

  1. (Australia, now considered offensive) An Aboriginal woman.
    • 1869, Thomas Livingstone Mitchell, Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1, page 273,
      His next shot was discharged amongst the mob, and most unfortunately wounded the gin already mentioned ; who, with a child fastened to her back, slid down the bank, and lay, apparently dying, with her legs in the water.
    • 1894, Ivan Dexter, Talmud: A Strange Narrative of Central Australia, published in serial form in Port Adelaide News and Lefevre’s Peninsula Advertiser (SA), Chapter XXI, [1]
      From my position I could see the gins pointing back, and as the men turned they looked for a moment and then made a wild rush for the entrance.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter XXI, p. 353, [2]
      How they must have laughed about the strutting of her whose mother was a wanton and aunt a gin!
    • 1988, Tom Cole, Hell West and Crooked, Angus & Robertson, 1995, p.179,
      Dad said Shoesmith and Thompson had made one error that cost them their lives by letting the gins into the camp, and the blacks speared them all.
    • 2008, Bill Marsh, Jack Goldsmith, Goldie: Adventures in a Vanishing Australia, unnumbered page,
      But there was this gin there, see, what they called a kitchen girl.
Related terms
  • blackgin
Synonyms
  • lubra
Derived terms
References

Etymology 5

Cognate to Scots gin (if): perhaps from gi(v)en, or a compound in which the first element is from Old English ġif (English if) and the second is cognate to English an (if) (compare iffen), or perhaps from again.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪn/

Conjunction

gin

  1. (chiefly Southern US, Appalachia, Scotland) If.
References

Anagrams

  • -ing, -ïng, GNI, IGN, NGI, ing, nig

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English gin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒin/
  • Homophones: djinn, jean

Noun

gin m (plural gins)

  1. gin

Further reading

  • “gin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *ganyetor (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɟɪnʲ/

Noun

gin f (genitive singular gine, nominative plural ginte)

  1. begetting, birth
  2. fetus
  3. offspring, child, person
  4. generating source

Declension

Derived terms

  • aonghin
  • athghin f (counterpart)

Verb

gin (present analytic gineann, future analytic ginfidh, verbal noun giniúint, past participle ginte)

    1. give birth to (used only in the autonomous form)
    2. germinate, sprout; spring forth; originate
    1. beget, procreate
    2. generate, produce

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • athghin (regenerate, verb)

Mutation

References

  • “gin” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gainithir”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Janday

Noun

gin

  1. woman, girl

Further reading

  • John Gladstone Steele, Aboriginal Pathways: in Southeast Queensland and the Richmond River

Japanese

Romanization

gin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ぎん

Romanian

Etymology

From English gin.

Noun

gin n (plural ginuri)

  1. gin

Declension


Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪn/

Etymology 1

Cognate to dialectal English gin (if), which see for more.

Conjunction

gin

  1. if (conditional; subjunctive)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
    • 1778, Alexander Ross, Fortunate Shepherdess, page 124:
      Then says the squire,
      Gin that be all your fear,
      She sanna want a man, for want of gear.
      A thousand pounds a year, well burthen free,
      I mak her sure of, gin she’ll gang with me.

Etymology 2

From Old English [Term?].

Preposition

gin

  1. Against; nearby; towards.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *ganyetor (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʲin/

Verb

gin (past ghin, future ginidh, verbal noun gintinn, past participle ginte)

  1. beget, produce, father
  2. create, engender
  3. procreate, reproduce
  4. breed
  5. (computing) generate

Derived terms

  • ath-ghin

Mutation

References

  • “gin” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gainithir”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Spanish

Noun

gin m (plural gines)

  1. gin
    Synonym: ginebra

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English gin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪn/ or IPA(key): /dʒɪn/

Noun

gin n

  1. gin (liquor)

Anagrams

  • -ing, Ing

Wiradhuri

Noun

gin

  1. Alternative spelling of geen


English

Etymology

From Middle English snare, from Old English snearu, sneare (a string; cord), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ (a sling; loop; noose). Cognate with Old Norse snara. Also related to German Schnur and Dutch snaar, snoer.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /snɛəɹ/, /snɛɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /snɛə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)

Noun

snare (plural snares)

  1. A trap (especially one made from a loop of wire, string, or leather).
    • 1943, Graham Greene, The Ministry of Fear, London: Heinemann, 1960, Book Three, Chapter One, pp. 196-197,[1]
      He [] watched Beavis’s long-toothed mouth open and clap to like a rabbit snare.
    • 2013, Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, New York: Knopf, 2014, Chapter 18, p. 332,[2]
      He felt a snare tightening around his throat; he gasped and threw a leg out of the bed, where it jerked for a second or two, thumping the steel frame, and died.
  2. A mental or psychological trap.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act IV, Scene 2,[3]
      If thou retire, the Dauphin, well appointed,
      Stands with the snares of war to tangle thee:
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Exodus 23.33,[4]
      [] if thou serve their gods, it will surely be a snare unto thee.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, p. 193,[5]
      [] and I had now liv’d two Years under these Uneasinesses, which indeed made my Life much less comfortable than it was before; as may well be imagin’d by any who know what it is to live in the constant Snare of the Fear of Man []
    • 1865, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter ,[6]
      [] riches are a great snare.”
    • 1978, Jan Morris, Farewell the Trumpets: An Imperial Retreat, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Part One, Chapter 9, p. 173,[7]
      They were devious war aims, and Allenby’s campaign was fought with a maximum of snare and subterfuge.
  3. (veterinary) A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.
  4. (surgery) A similar looped instrument formerly used to remove tumours etc.
  5. (music) A set of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin of a drum to create a rattling sound.
  6. (music) A snare drum.

Translations

Verb

snare (third-person singular simple present snares, present participle snaring, simple past and past participle snared)

  1. (transitive) To catch or hold, especially with a loop.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To ensnare.

Translations

Related terms

  • ensnare
  • snare drum
  • snare-picture
  • snarl

Anagrams

  • Naser, Nears, RNase, Saner, Serna, eRNAs, earns, ernas, nares, nears, reans, saner

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English sneare, snearu, from Proto-West Germanic *snarhā, from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ.

Alternative forms

  • snaare, snarr, snarre

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsnaːr(ə)/

Noun

snare (plural snares)

  1. A trap for catching animals.
  2. A noose or snare (rope loop)
  3. (figuratively) A temptation or peril.
Related terms
  • snaren
  • snarl
Descendants
  • English: snare
  • Scots: snare
References
  • “snāre, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Verb

snare

  1. Alternative form of snaren

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse snara.

Noun

snare f or m (definite singular snara or snaren, indefinite plural snarer, definite plural snarene)

  1. a snare
  2. a trap
    Synonym: felle

Verb

snare (present tense snarer, past tense snara or snaret, past participle snara or snaret)

  1. (transitive) to catch in a snare

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

snare

  1. inflection of snar:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References

  • “snare” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Arnes, Ernas, anser, ranes, rasen, rensa, saner

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse snara (a snare), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ. Cognate with English snare.

Alternative forms

  • (noun): Snara, Snora, snara, snora, snoru (obsolete forms and spellings)
  • (verb): snara (split and a-infinitives)

Noun

snare f (definite singular snara, indefinite plural snarer, definite plural snarene)

  1. a snare
  2. a trap
    Synonym: felle
Derived terms
  • rennesnare

Verb

snare (present tense snarar, past tense snara, past participle snara, passive infinitive snarast, present participle snarande, imperative snar)

  1. (transitive) to catch in a snare
  2. (transitive) to ensnare

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

snare

  1. inflection of snar:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References

  • “snare” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Arnes, Ernas, ensar, naser, rasen, saner

Swedish

Adjective

snare

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of snar.

Anagrams

  • Arnes, Enars, Ernas, anser, arens, enars, erans, rasen, reans, renas, rensa, resan

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