girl vs miss what difference

what is difference between girl and miss

English

Alternative forms

  • girle, gyrle (obsolete)
  • gal (colloquial)
  • guhrl, gurl (nonstandard)
  • grrrl, grrl (slang)

Etymology

From Middle English gerle, girle, gyrle (young person of any gender), of uncertain origin. Probably from Old English *gyrle, *gyrele, from Proto-Germanic *gurwilaz, a diminutive form of Proto-Germanic *gurwijaz (compare North Frisian gör (girl), Low German Gör, Göre (child of any gender), German Göre (young child), dialectal Norwegian gorre, dialectal Swedish garre, gurre (small child)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (short) (compare Old Irish gair (short), Ancient Greek χρεώ (khreṓ, need, necessity), χρήσθαι (khrḗsthai, to need), Sanskrit ह्रस्व (hrasva, short, small)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡɜːɫ/, (obsolete) /ɡɛəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡɝɫ/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ɡɵːl/, [ɡʏw]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)l
  • Homophone: Guirl

Noun

girl (countable and uncountable, plural girls)

  1. A female child, adolescent, or a young woman.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:girl
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:boy
    • 2006, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness, volume 3 of Scott Pilgrim
      Scott: Hey, it’s our 8-month anniversary.
      Envy: Really? I can’t even believe you remember that stuff!
      Scott: Whoa, wait a second… Am I the girl in this relationship?
      Envy: You totally are!
  2. A young female animal.
  3. (sometimes offensive) A woman, especially a young and often attractive woman.
  4. A female servant; a maid. (see usage notes)
    Synonyms: char, charlady, charwoman, maid, maiden, maidservant, womanservant
  5. (uncommon, card games) A queen (the playing card.)
  6. (colloquial) A term of endearment. (see usage notes)
    Synonyms: girlie, lass, lassie
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, pp. 8–9:
      ‘Now, girls,’ continued Healey, ‘you’re very high-spirited and that’s as it should be but I won’t have you getting out of hand…’ Setting a spatted foot on the bench that ran down the middle of the changing-room with elegant distain, Adrian began to flip through the pile of Y-fronts and rugger shorts with his cane.
  7. One’s girlfriend.
    • 1922, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Girl from Hollywood
      There isn’t any guy going to steal my girl!
  8. One’s daughter.
  9. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) A roebuck two years old.
  10. (US, slang, uncountable) Cocaine, especially in powder form.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cocaine
    • 1969, Iceberg Slim, Pimp: The Story of My Life, Cash Money Content (2011), →ISBN, page 43:
      She had taught me to snort girl, and almost always when I came to her pad, there would be thin sparkling rows of crystal cocaine on the glass top of the cocktail table.
    • 1977, Odie Hawkins, Chicago Hustle, Holloway House (1987), →ISBN, page 175:
      Elijah nodded congenially to the early evening regulars in the Afro Lounge, headed straight for the telephone hung midway between the mens and womens, his nose smarting from a couple thick lines of recently snorted girl.
    • 2005, K’wan, Hoodlum, St. Martin’s Press (2005), →ISBN, page 185:
      After about an hour or two of half-ass sex and snorting girl, Honey was zoned out. [] She flexed her still numb fingers, trying to find a warmth that didn’t seem to come. Cocaine always made her numb.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:girl.
  11. (somewhat childish) A female (tree, gene, etc).
    • 1950, Pageant:
      Are there “boy” trees and “girl” trees? Yes. A number of species, among them the yew, holly and date-bearing palm, have their male and female flowers on different trees. The male holly, for instance, must be planted fairly close to the female …
    • 1970 [earlier 1963], Helen V. Wilson, Helen Van Pelt, Helen Van Pelt’s African Violets, Dutton Adult (→ISBN):
      Of the 100 percent total, 25 will have two girl genes, 50 will have one boy and one girl gene, and 25 will have two boy genes.
    • 1972, GSN Gesneriad Saintpaulia News: African Violets, Gloxinias, Other Gesneriads and Exotic Plants:
      When there are two “girl” genes the plant is a girl dwarf.
  12. (derogatory) A boy or man who is weak or sentimental.
    Synonyms: Jessie, sissy, wimp
    Don’t be such a girl!

Usage notes

  • (any woman, regardless of her age): An adult calling a grown woman a “girl” may be considered either a compliment or an insult, depending on context and sensibilities. In some cases, the term is used as a euphemism for virgin, to distinguish a female who has never engaged in sexual intercourse (a “girl”) from one who has done so (and is a woman). Even if the word “girl” in most cases is not meant to be derogatory, it may still be patronising sometimes, especially when used to address someone older than oneself.
  • (term of endearment): When used as a term of endearment, it can be used for someone female or, in some contexts, for someone male, such as the use within the gay community.

Derived terms

Pages starting with “girl”.

Descendants

  • Hungarian: görl
  • Japanese: ガール (gāru)

Translations

References

Verb

girl (third-person singular simple present girls, present participle girling, simple past and past participle girled)

  1. (transitive) To feminize or girlify; to gender as a girl or as for girls.
  2. (somewhat informal) To staff with or as a girl or girls.
    • 1949, The New Yorker:
      Making our way past a one-girl switchboard temporarily girled by two frantic operators, we found the victorious president, Elliott A. Bowles, barely visible behind a heap of telegrams […]
    • 1961, The Georgia Review:
      Her first shock came when the ship on which she and her husband arrived was met by three boats “girled” by “great, splendid creatures, as tall as our millionaires’ tallest daughters, and as strong-looking as any of our college-girl athletes,” …
    • 1986, Marcus Cunliffe, The Literature of the United States, New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Penguin Books (→ISBN):
      She and her Altrurian diplomat husband, arriving there by sea, are greeted by flower-laden boats, each not manned, but girled by six rowers, who pulled as true a stroke as I ever saw.
    • 2009, Linda Howard, Night Moves: Dream Man/After the Night, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN), page 220:
      To her disappointment, the chatty Carlene DuBois wasn’t behind the desk; instead it was manned—or girled—by a frothy little blonde who barely looked old enough to be out of high school.

See also

  • miss

Anagrams

  • LIRG, gril

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡœʁl/

Noun

girl f (plural girls)

  1. dancing girl


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /mɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English missen, from Old English missan (to miss, escape the notice of a person), Proto-Germanic *missijaną (to miss, go wrong, fail), from Proto-Indo-European *meytH- (to change, exchange, trade). Cognate with West Frisian misse (to miss), Dutch missen (to miss), German missen (to miss), Norwegian Bokmål and Danish miste (to lose), Swedish missa (to miss), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic missa (to lose).

Verb

miss (third-person singular simple present misses, present participle missing, simple past and past participle missed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To fail to hit.
    • 1666, Edmund Waller, “Instructions to a Painter
      Flying bullets now,
      To execute his rage, appear too slow;
      They miss, or sweep but common souls away.
  2. (transitive) To fail to achieve or attain.
  3. (transitive) To avoid; to escape.
  4. (transitive) To become aware of the loss or absence of; to feel the want or need of, sometimes with regret.
    • The boy became volubly friendly and bubbling over with unexpected humour and high spirits. He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. Nobody would miss them, he explained.
  5. (transitive) To fail to understand; to have a shortcoming of perception; overlook.
  6. (transitive) To fail to attend.
  7. (transitive) To be late for something (a means of transportation, a deadline, etc.).
  8. (transitive) To be wanting; to lack something that should be present.
  9. (poker, said of a card) To fail to help the hand of a player.
  10. (sports) To fail to score (a goal).
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To go wrong; to err.
  12. (intransitive, obsolete) To be absent, deficient, or wanting.
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Antonyms
  • (to fail to hit): hit, strike, impinge on, run into, collide with
  • (to feel the absence of): have, feature
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

miss (plural misses)

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A failure to obtain or accomplish.
  3. An act of avoidance (usually used with the verb give)
  4. (computing) The situation where an item is not found in a cache and therefore needs to be explicitly loaded.
Derived terms
  • swing and a miss
Translations

Etymology 2

From mistress.

Alternative forms

  • Miss
  • meess, Meess (archaic, eye dialect)

Noun

miss (countable and uncountable, plural misses)

  1. A title of respect for a young woman (usually unmarried) with or without a name used.
  2. An unmarried woman; a girl.
  3. A kept woman; a mistress.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)
  4. (card games) In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

Coordinate terms

  • (titles) (of a man): Mr (Mister, mister), Sir (sir); (of a woman): Ms (Miz, mizz), Mrs (Mistress, mistress), Miss (miss), Dame (dame), (of a non-binary person): Mx (Mixter); (see also): Dr (Doctor, doctor), Madam (madam, ma’am) (Category: en:Titles)
Derived terms
  • Miss Havishamesque
Related terms
  • missis, missus
  • missy
Translations

Anagrams

  • ISMS, MSIs, SIMS, Sims, isms, sims

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from English miss.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmis/

Noun

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

Dutch

Etymology

From English miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪs/

Noun

miss f (plural missen, diminutive missje n)

  1. A winner of a beauty contest.
    Annelien Coorevits was Miss België in 2007.

    Annelien Coorevits was Miss Belgium in 2007.
  2. A beauty.
  3. A girl with a high self-esteem.
    Dat is nogal een miss, hoor.

    She has some air.

German

Alternative forms

  • miß (superseded)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Verb

miss

  1. second-person singular imperative of messen

Ingrian

Pronoun

miss

  1. Chernyavskij’s form of mis

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

miss

  1. imperative of missa

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *missą, *missijaz, *missō (loss, want), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- (to change, replace). Cognate with Old Norse missir, missa (a loss).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miss/, [mis]

Noun

miss n

  1. loss; absence

Declension

Related terms

  • missan (verb)

Polish

Etymology

From English Miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //mʲis//

Noun

miss f (indeclinable)

  1. beauty queen

Further reading

  • miss in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • miss in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmis/, [ˈmis]
  • Homophone: mis

Noun

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

References

  • “miss” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

miss c

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A mistake.
  3. (rare) A beauty; a winner of a beauty contest.
    Miss Hawaii gick vidare och vann Miss America-tävlingen

    Miss Hawaii went on to win the Miss America contest

Declension

Synonyms

  • (failure to hit): bom
  • (mistake): misstag
  • (beauty): skönhetsmiss

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