gist vs substance what difference

what is difference between gist and substance

English

Etymology

From Old French gist, from the verb gesir (to lie down), from Latin iaceō. Compare French gésir or gîte (lodging).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɪst/
  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Noun

gist (plural gists)

  1. The most essential part; the main idea or substance (of a longer or more complicated matter); the crux of a matter; the pith.
    • 1948, Carl Sandburg, Remembrance Rock, page 103,
      “Should they live and build their church in the American wilderness, their worst dangers would rise in and among themselves rather than outside. That was the gist of the lesson from their pastor and “wellwiller” John Robinson.”
    • 1996, Nicky Silver, Etiquette and Vitriol, Theatre Communications Group 1996, p. 10:
      I was really just vomiting images like spoiled sushi (that may be an ill-considered metaphor, but you get my gist).
    • 2003, David McDuff, translating Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, Penguin 2003 p. 183:
      I don’t remember his exact words, but the gist of it was that he wanted it all for nothing, as quickly as possible, without any effort.
  2. (law, dated) The essential ground for action in a suit, without which there is no cause of action.
  3. (obsolete) Resting place (especially of animals), lodging.
    • 1601, Philemon Holland’s translation of Pliny’s Natural History, 1st ed., book X, chapter XXIII “Of Swallowes, Ousles, or Merles, Thrushes, Stares or Sterlings, Turtles, and Stockdoves.”, p. 282:
      These Quailes have their set gists, to wit, ordinarie resting and baiting places. [These quails have their set gists, to wit, ordinary resting and baiting places.]

Synonyms

  • (most essential part): crux, quintessence; See also Thesaurus:gist
  • (essential ground for action): gravamen
  • (resting place): lair

Translations

Verb

gist (third-person singular simple present gists, present participle gisting, simple past and past participle gisted)

  1. To summarize, to extract and present the most important parts of.
    • 1873, Journal of Proceedings and Addresses of the National Educational Association, session of the year 1872, at Boston, Massachusetts, page 201:
      There are two general ways of getting information, and these two general ways may be summed up in this: take one branch of study and its principles are all gisted, they have been gisted by the accumulated thought of years gone by. These gisted thoughts are axioms, or received principles, []

Translations

References

  • Webster, Noah (1828), “gist”, in An American Dictionary of the English Language
  • “gist” in Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed, 1856.
  • gist in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • GTis, ISTG, gits, stig, tigs

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɪst/
  • Hyphenation: gist
  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch gest, gist, from Old Dutch *gest, *gist, from Proto-West Germanic *jestu, from Proto-Germanic *jestuz.

Noun

gist f (plural gisten)

  1. yeast
Derived terms
  • biergist
  • gisten
  • gistzwam
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: gis

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gist

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of gisten
  2. imperative of gisten

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gist

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of gissen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of gissen

Middle English

Noun

gist

  1. Alternative form of gest

Old French

Verb

gist

  1. third-person singular present indicative of gesir

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin iūstus, jūstus.

Adjective

gist m (feminine singular gista, masculine plural gists, feminine plural gistas)

  1. right

Yola

Alternative forms

  • jeist

Etymology

From Middle English juste.

Adverb

gist

  1. just, just now

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Alternative forms

  • substaunce (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English substance, from Old French substance, from Latin substantia (substance, essence), from substāns, present active participle of substō (exist, literally stand under), from sub + stō (stand).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbstəns/, [ˈsʌbstənts]

Noun

substance (countable and uncountable, plural substances)

  1. Physical matter; material.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    Synonyms: matter, stuff
  2. The essential part of anything; the most vital part.
    • Heroic virtue did his actions guide, / And he the substance, not the appearance, chose.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, Sacred Theory of the Earth
      This edition is the same in substance with the Latin.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace
      It is insolent in words, in manner; but in substance it is not only insulting, but alarming.
    Synonyms: crux, gist
  3. Substantiality; solidity; firmness.
  4. Material possessions; estate; property; resources.
    • And there wasted his substance with riotous living.
  5. A form of matter that has constant chemical composition and characteristic properties.
  6. Drugs (illegal narcotics)
    Synonyms: dope, gear
  7. (theology) Hypostasis.

Synonyms

  • (physical matter): See also Thesaurus:substance
  • (essential part of anything): See also Thesaurus:gist
  • (drugs): See also Thesaurus:recreational drug

Related terms

Translations

Verb

substance (third-person singular simple present substances, present participle substancing, simple past and past participle substanced)

  1. (rare, transitive) To give substance to; to make real or substantial.

See also

  • style

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin substantia (substance, essence), from substāns, present active participle of substō (exist, literally stand under), from sub + stō (stand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /syp.stɑ̃s/
  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃s

Noun

substance f (plural substances)

  1. substance

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “substance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • cubassent

Middle English

Etymology

From Old French substance.

Noun

substance

  1. essence

Descendants

  • English: substance

Old French

Alternative forms

  • sostance, sustance

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin substantia.

Noun

substance f (oblique plural substances, nominative singular substance, nominative plural substances)

  1. most essential; substantial part
  2. existence

Related terms

  • substantiel

Descendants


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