git vs stinkpot what difference

what is difference between git and stinkpot

English

Alternative forms

  • get

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɡɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt
  • Homophone: ghit (one pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Middle English get ([illegitimate] offspring). A southern variant of Scots get (illegitimate child, brat), related to beget.

Noun

git (plural gits)

  1. (Britain, slang, derogatory) A silly, incompetent, stupid, annoying, or childish person (usually a man).
    • 2000 December 18, BBC and Bafta Tribute to Michael Caine, 16:43–17:05:
      Parkinson: You made films before, but the part that really made your name was Zulu, wasn’t it [] and there of course—against type—you played the toff, you played the officer.
      Caine: I played the officer, yeah, and everybody thought I was like that. Everyone was so shocked when they met me, this like Cockney guy had played this toffee-nosed git.
Usage notes
  • Git is usually used as an insult, more severe than twit but less severe than a true profanity like wanker or arsehole, and may often be used affectionately between friends. Get can also be used, with a subtle change of meaning. “You cheeky get!” is slightly less harsh than “You cheeky git!”.
  • Git is frequently used in conjunction with another word to achieve a more specific meaning. For instance a “smarmy git” refers to a person of a slimy, ingratiating disposition; a “jammy git” would be a person with undeserved luck. The phrase “grumpy old git”, denoting a cantankerous old man, is used with particular frequency.
  • In parts of northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland, get is still used in preference to git. In the Republic of Ireland, get, rather than git is used.
  • The word has been ruled by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be unparliamentary language.
Translations

Verb

git (third-person singular simple present gitting, present participle got, simple past and past participle gotten)

  1. (Appalachia, Southern US, African-American Vernacular) To get, begone.
  2. (Appalachia, Southern US, African-American Vernacular) To get (leave; scram; begone).

Etymology 2

Noun

git (plural gits)

  1. Alternative form of geat (channel in metal casting)

See also

  • git gud

References

Anagrams

  • GTi, IGT, TIG, tig

Dutch

Etymology

From French jet, or directly from Latin gagātēs after Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia).

Pronunciation

Noun

git n or f (plural gitten, diminutive gitje n)

  1. (neuter) lignite
  2. (neuter) jet (black, gemstone-like geological material)
  3. (masculine) a stone made of this material

Derived terms

  • gitzwart (jet-black, the blackest black)

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒi/

Verb

git

  1. Post-1990 spelling of gît. (third-person singular present indicative of gésir)

Latin

Etymology

Compare Hebrew גַּד(gad)
(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

git n (indeclinable)

  1. A plant (Nigella sativa), variously named black cumin, Roman coriander, or melanthion.

References

  • git in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • git in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *jit, from Proto-Germanic *jut. Cognate with North Frisian jat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jit/

Pronoun

ġit

  1. you two (nominative dual form of þū)

Related terms

  • incit
  • inc
  • incer

Descendants

  • Middle English: ȝit, ȝitt, ȝet

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *jit, from Proto-Germanic *jut, remodeled in Proto-Northwest Germanic to *jit by analogy with *wit.

Pronoun

git

  1. You two; nominative dual of thū

Declension


Polish

Etymology

From Yiddish גוט(gut), from Old High German guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʲit/

Interjection

git

  1. (colloquial) excellent!

Adjective

git

  1. (colloquial) just right

Declension

Indeclinable.

Further reading

  • git in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • git in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡit/
  • Hyphenation: git

Verb

git

  1. second-person singular imperative of gitmek

Antonyms

  • gitme
  • gel

Vilamovian

Noun

git f

  1. goodness

Volapük

Noun

git (nominative plural gits)

  1. law (body of binding rules and regulations, customs and standards)

Declension

Derived terms

  • gitav (jurisprudence)
  • gitavan (jurist)
  • gitavik (juristic)
  • gitäd (judiciary)
  • gität (right)
  • gitätön (have the right)
  • gitik (juridicial)
  • gitod (justification)
  • gitöf (legitimacy)
  • gitöfik (legitimate)


English

Wikispecies

Wikispecies

Etymology

stink +‎ pot

Pronunciation

Noun

stinkpot (plural stinkpots)

  1. An annoying, bad or undesirable person.
  2. The common musk turtle, a species of turtle from southeastern Canada, Sternotherus odoratus.
  3. The southern giant petrel, Macronectes giganteus.
  4. (nautical, slang) A motorboat.
  5. (military, historical) A stinkball.

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