give vs throw what difference

what is difference between give and throw

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English given, from Old Norse gefa (to give), from Proto-Germanic *gebaną (to give). Merged with native Middle English yiven, ȝeven, from Old English ġiefan, from the same Proto-Germanic source (compare the obsolete inherited English doublet yive).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪv/
  • Rhymes: -ɪv

Verb

give (third-person singular simple present gives, present participle giving, simple past gave, past participle given)

  1. (ditransitive) To move, shift, provide something abstract or concrete to someone or something or somewhere.
    1. To transfer one’s possession or holding of (something) to (someone).
    2. To make a present or gift of.
    3. To pledge.
    4. To provide (something) to (someone), to allow or afford.
    5. To cause (a sensation or feeling) to exist in.
    6. To carry out (a physical interaction) with (something).
    7. To pass (something) into (someone’s hand, etc.).
    8. To cause (a disease or condition) in, or to transmit (a disease or condition) to.
  2. (ditransitive) To estimate or predict (a duration or probability) for (something).
  3. (intransitive) To yield slightly when a force is applied.
  4. (intransitive) To collapse under pressure or force.
  5. (transitive) To provide, as, a service or a broadcast.
    • 2003, Iain Aitken, Value-Driven IT Management: Commercializing the IT Function, page 153
      [] who did not have a culture in which ‘giving good presentation’ and successfully playing the internal political game was the way up.
    • 2006, Christopher Matthew Spencer The Ebay Entrepreneur, page 248
      A friendly voice on the phone welcoming prospective new clients is a must. Don’t underestimate the importance of giving good “phone”.
  6. (intransitive) To lead (onto or into).
  7. (transitive, dated) To provide a view of.
    His window gave the park.
  8. To exhibit as a product or result; to produce; to yield.
    The number of men, divided by the number of ships, gives four hundred to each ship.
  9. To cause; to make; used with the infinitive.
  10. To cause (someone) to have; produce in (someone); effectuate.
  11. To allow or admit by way of supposition; to concede.
    He can be bad-tempered, I’ll give you that, but he’s a hard worker.
  12. To attribute; to assign; to adjudge.
  13. To communicate or announce (advice, tidings, etc.); to pronounce or utter (an opinion, a judgment, a shout, etc.).
  14. (dated or religion) To grant power, permission, destiny, etc. (especially to a person); to allot; to allow.
  15. (reflexive) To devote or apply (oneself).
  16. (obsolete) To become soft or moist.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  17. (obsolete) To shed tears; to weep.
  18. (obsolete) To have a misgiving.
    • c. 1608-1634, John Webster, Appius and Virginia, page 16
      My mind gives ye’re reserv’d / To rob poor market women.
  19. (slang) To be going on, to be occurring
Usage notes
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb give had the form givest, and had gavest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form giveth was used.
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (transfer possession of): See Thesaurus:give
  • (bend slightly when a force is applied): bend, cede, flex, move, yield, split
  • (estimate or predict): estimate, guess, predict
  • (provide):
Antonyms
  • (transfer possession of): get, obtain, receive, take
  • (bend slightly when a force is applied): not bend/cede/flex/give/move/yield, resist
Derived terms

See also given, giver and giving

Translations

Noun

give (uncountable)

  1. The amount of bending that something undergoes when a force is applied to it; a tendency to yield under pressure; resilence.
    This chair doesn’t have much give.
    There is no give in his dogmatic religious beliefs.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

give (plural gives)

  1. Alternative form of gyve

References

  • give at OneLook Dictionary Search

Danish

Alternative forms

  • gi’ (representing the spoken language)

Etymology

From Old Norse gefa, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną, cognate with English give and German geben. The Germanic verbs goes back to Proto-Indo-European *gʰebʰ- (to give) (hence Sanskrit गभस्ति (gábhasti, arm)) rather than *gʰeh₁bʰ- (to grab) (hence Latin habeō (to have)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊iˀ], [ˈɡ̊i], (formal) IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊iːʋə]
  • Rhymes: -iː, -iːvɐ

Verb

give (imperative giv, present tense giver, past tense gav, past participle givet, c given, givne)

  1. to give

Conjugation

Derived terms


Swedish

Verb

give

  1. present subjunctive of giva

Anagrams

  • evig


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: thrō, IPA(key): /θɹəʊ/, [θɾ̪̊əʊ]
  • (US) enPR: thrō, IPA(key): /θɹoʊ/, [θɾ̪̊oʊ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: throe

Etymology 1

From Middle English throwen, thrawen, from Old English þrāwan (to turn, twist, curl, rack, torture, turn around), from Proto-West Germanic *þrāan, from Proto-Germanic *þrēaną (to twist, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₁- (to rub, rub by twisting, twist, turn). Cognate with Scots thraw (to twist, turn, throw), West Frisian triuwe (to push), Dutch draaien (to turn), Low German draien, dreien (to turn (in a lathe)), German drehen (to turn), Danish dreje (to turn), Swedish dreja (to turn), Albanian dredh (to turn, twist, tremble), Bulgarian изтърва́вам (iztǎrvávam, to drop).

Verb

throw (third-person singular simple present throws, present participle throwing, simple past threw, past participle thrown)

  1. (transitive) To hurl; to cause an object to move rapidly through the air.
    Synonyms: bowl, bung, buzz, cast, catapult, chuck, dash, direct, fire, fling, flip, heave, hurl, launch, lob, pitch, project, propel, send, shoot, shy, sling, toss, whang
  2. (transitive) To eject or cause to fall off.
    Synonyms: eject, throw off
  3. (transitive) To move to another position or condition; to displace.
    Synonyms: displace, relocate
  4. (ceramics) To make (a pot) by shaping clay as it turns on a wheel.
  5. (transitive, cricket, of a bowler) to deliver (the ball) illegally by straightening the bowling arm during delivery.
  6. (transitive, computing) To send (an error) to an exception-handling mechanism in order to interrupt normal processing.
  7. (sports, video games) To intentionally lose a game.
    • 2012, August 1. Peter Walker and Haroon Siddique in Guardian Unlimited, Eight Olympic badminton players disqualified for ‘throwing games’
      Four pairs of women’s doubles badminton players, including the Chinese top seeds, have been ejected from the Olympic tournament for trying to throw matches in an effort to secure a more favourable quarter-final draw.
    Synonym: take a dive
  8. (transitive, informal) To confuse or mislead.
  9. (figuratively) To send desperately.
  10. (transitive) To imprison.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
      The plot of Felix was quickly discovered, and De Lacey and Agatha were thrown into prison.
    • 1993, Margaret McKee, Fred Chisenhall, Beale black & blue: life and music on black America’s main street – Page 30
      The standard method of dealing with an addict was to arrest him, throw him into a cell, and leave him until the agonizing pangs of withdrawal were over.
  11. To organize an event, especially a party.
    • 1979, Working Mother, July 1979, Page 72[1]
      Should you be interested, for whatever reason, it will tell you how to throw a party for your 40-year-old husband or your 100-year-old great-grandmother. It also describes games that can be played at various kinds of parties []
  12. (transitive, intransitive) To roll (a die or dice).
    • 1844, Samuel Laing translating Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla
      The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw the highest should have the district. The Swedish king threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw.
  13. (transitive) To cause a certain number on the die or dice to be shown after rolling it.
    • 1844, Samuel Laing translating Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla
      The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw the highest should have the district. The Swedish king threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw.
  14. (transitive, bridge) To discard.
  15. (martial arts) To lift the opponent off the ground and bring him back down, especially into a position behind the thrower.
  16. (transitive, said of one’s voice) To change in order to give the illusion that the voice is that of someone else.
  17. (transitive) To show sudden emotion, especially anger.
    • 1991, Janet L. Davies, Ellen Hastings Janosik, Mental health and psychiatric nursing: a caring approach
      Bill runs into the kitchen and tells Dad that Erik is throwing a tantrum. He tells Bill to go back and watch his program and to ignore his brother. Fifteen minutes later, Erik is still screaming []
    • 1996, New York Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 32, 19 Aug 1996; Entertaining Mrs Stone
      In 1975, pregnant with the second of her three children, she threw a hissy fit to get on a trip to Boston for elected officials.
  18. (transitive) To project or send forth.
  19. To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.
  20. To twist two or more filaments of (silk, etc.) so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlinson to this entry?)
  21. (baseball, slang, of a team, a manager, etc.) To select (a pitcher); to assign a pitcher to a given role (such as starter or reliever).
    • 2009, Michael T. Lynch, Jr., It Ain’t So: A Might-Have-Been History of the White Sox in 1919 and Beyond, page 63 →ISBN
      I have a minor quibble with Gleason’s decision to throw Lefty Williams in Game Eight with the Series in the balance.
  22. (transitive) To install (a bridge).
    • 1860, Fredrika Bremer (trans. Mary Howitt), Life in the Old World, v. 1, p. 164.
      [] across the rapid smaragdus-green waters, pouring onward into the country, are thrown three bridges …
  23. (obsolete, Scotland, Northern England) To twist or turn.
  24. (American football) Synonym of pass
  25. (transitive) (of a punch or boxing combination) to deliver
    • 1941, Newsweek, Volume 18, p.54, [2]
      ···not only did I not want to throw a punch at him, I wanted to give him a solid silver token of thanks···
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:throw
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. The flight of a thrown object.
  2. The act of throwing something.
    • 2006, Hans-Wolfgang Loidl, Trends in Functional Programming (volume 5, page 62)
      If the expression is a throw, we unwind the stack seeking a handler expression.
  3. One’s ability to throw.
  4. A distance travelled; displacement.
    • 1947, James Jerome Gibson, Motion Picture Testing and Research (issue 7, page 49)
      The visibility of the screen image is affected by the length of throw of the projector, the type of projector, the intensity of the projector lamp, and the type of the screen.
  5. A piece of fabric used to cover a bed, sofa or other soft furnishing.
  6. A single instance, occurrence, venture, or chance.
Translations

Derived terms

  • a stone’s throw
  • bike throw
  • corner throw
  • throw pillow
  • throw-up

References

  • Krueger, Dennis (December 1982). “Why On Earth Do They Call It Throwing?” Studio Potter Vol. 11, Number 1.[3]

Etymology 2

From Middle English throwe, alteration of thrawe, from Old English þrāwu (labor pang, agony in childbirth or death), akin to Old English þrēa (affliction, pang), þrōwan (to suffer). More at throe.

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. Pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  2. (veterinary) The act of giving birth in animals, especially in cows.

Verb

throw (third-person singular simple present throws, present participle throwing, simple past threw, past participle thrown)

  1. (transitive, said of animals) To give birth to.
    • 1916, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association: Volume 49
      At the end of the normal gestation period the cow threw two calf mummies as large as cats.

Etymology 3

From Middle English, from Old English þrāh, þrāg (space of time, period, while). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Gothic ???????????????????????????? (þragjan, to run).

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. (obsolete) A moment, time, occasion.
  2. (obsolete) A period of time; a while.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.iv:
      Downe himselfe he layd / Vpon the grassie ground, to sleepe a throw; / The cold earth was his couch, the hard steele his pillow.
Synonyms
  • stound

Etymology 4

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. Obsolete form of throe.
    • 1806, The Evangelical Magazine (page 441)
      [] when we behold the fixed eye, the pale lips, the convulsive throws of death distorting the countenance; []

Anagrams

  • -worth, Worth, whort, worth, wroth

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