glad vs gladiola what difference

what is difference between glad and gladiola

English

Etymology

From Middle English glad, gled, from Old English glæd (shining; bright; cheerful; glad), from Proto-Germanic *gladaz (shiny; gleaming; radiant; happy; glossy; smooth; flat), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰladʰ-, from *ǵʰelh₂- (to shine).

Cognate with Scots gled, glaid (shining; bright; glad), Saterland Frisian glääd (smooth; sleek), West Frisian glêd (smooth), Dutch glad (smooth; sleek; slippery), German glatt (smooth; sleek; slippery), Danish, Norwegian and Swedish glad (glad; happy; cheerful), Icelandic glaður (glad; joyful; cheery), Latin glaber (smooth; hairless; bald). Doublet of glatt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Adjective

glad (comparative gladder or more glad, superlative gladdest or most glad)

  1. Pleased, happy, gratified.
    • A wise son maketh a glad father.
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act III Scene 2
      Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d / To bear the tidings of calamity.
    • “I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I’d be a big man some day, and—I’m glad I didn’t steal.”
  2. (obsolete) Having a bright or cheerful appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness.
    • 1590, Philip Sidney, Arcadia
      Her conversation / More glad to me than to a miser money is.

Antonyms

  • sorrowful
  • sad
  • downcast
  • peevish
  • cranky
  • heavy
  • depressed

Derived terms

  • engladden
  • gladden
  • gladly

Translations

Verb

glad (third-person singular simple present glads, present participle gladding, simple past and past participle gladded)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To make glad
    Synonyms: cheer up, gladden, exhilarate
    • that which gladded all the warrior train
    • 1922, A. E. Housman, Epithalamium, line 3
      God that glads the lover’s heart

Anagrams

  • GDAL

Breton

Alternative forms

  • gwlad

Etymology

From Middle Breton gloat (kingdom, wealth), from Proto-Brythonic *gwlad, from Proto-Celtic *wlatis (sovereignty), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wélh₁tis ~ *h₂wl̥h₁téy-, from the root *h₂welh₁-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɑːt/

Noun

glad f (plural gladoù)

  1. arable land
  2. patrimony, estate
  3. (archaic) territory, country
  4. (archaic) feudal domain

Inflection


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlað/, [ˈɡ̊læð], [ˈklæð̠˕ˠ]
  • Rhymes: -ad

Adjective

glad (neuter glad, plural and definite singular attributive glade, comparative gladere, superlative (predicative) gladest, superlative (attributive) gladeste)

  1. happy, glad

References

  • “glad” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch glat, from Old Dutch *glad, from Proto-Germanic *gladaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣlɑt/
  • Hyphenation: glad
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Adjective

glad (comparative gladder, superlative gladst)

  1. smooth, polished
  2. slippery

Inflection

Derived terms

  • gladheid
  • gladjanus
  • spekglad
  • spiegelglad

Descendants

  • Berbice Creole Dutch: glati
  • Negerhollands: glat
  • Papiamentu: glad (dated)

Adverb

glad

  1. completely, entirely (mostly along with verbs and adjective with a negative meaning)

Usage notes

The usage as an adverb is highly restricted to verbs such as vergeten (to forget) and bederven (to spoil, to rot) and adjectives such as mis (wrong, incorrect) and verkeerd (wrong, incorrect).


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • glade, gladde, glaid, gled

Etymology

From Old English glæd, from Proto-West Germanic *glad.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlaːd/, /ɡlad/

Adjective

glad

  1. joyful, merry, happy

Descendants

  • English: glad
  • Scots: gled, glaid
  • Yola: glaude

References

  • “glā̆d, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɽɑː/, /ɡlɑː/

Adjective

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladere, indefinite superlative gladest, definite superlative gladeste)

  1. happy, glad

References

  • “glad” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr. Akin to English glad.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɑː/

Adjective

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladare, indefinite superlative gladast, definite superlative gladaste)

  1. happy, glad

References

  • “glad” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gladaz

Adjective

glad

  1. glad

Declension



Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *goldъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlâːd/

Noun

glȃd f (Cyrillic spelling гла̑д)

  1. hunger
    ko radi, ne boji se gladi

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish glaþer, from Old Norse glaðr, from Proto-Germanic *gladaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰladʰ-, derivation of Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shine).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɑːd/

Adjective

glad (comparative gladare, superlative gladast)

  1. happy, glad

Declension

Related terms

  • glädja
  • glädje

Anagrams

  • lagd


English

Noun

gladiola (plural gladiolas)

  1. (US) Gladiolus.

Anagrams

  • dialogal

Czech

Noun

gladiola f

  1. gladiolus

Synonyms

  • mečík

Further reading

  • gladiola in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • gladiola in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡladiˈola]

Noun

gladiola f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of gladiolă

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

gladióla f (Cyrillic spelling гладио́ла)

  1. gladiolus

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