glamour vs witch what difference

what is difference between glamour and witch

English

Etymology

Some say from Scots glamer, supposedly from earlier Scots gramarye (magic, enchantment, spell).

The Scottish term may either be from Ancient Greek γραμμάριον (grammárion, gram), the weight unit of ingredients used to make magic potions, or an alteration of the English word grammar (any sort of scholarship, especially occult learning).

A connection has also been suggested with Old Norse glámr (poet. “moon,” name of a ghost) and glámsýni (glamour, illusion, literally glam-sight). From Grettir’s Saga aka Grettis Saga, one of the Sagas of Icelanders, after the hero has been cursed by Glam, aka Glamr:

“…he was become so fearsome a man in the dark, that he durst go nowhither alone after nightfall, for then he seemed to see all kinds of horrors.

And that has fallen since into a proverb, that Glam lends eyes, or gives Glamsight to those who see things nowise as they are.”

Glamsight (glámsýni) is also referred to in the Icelandic collection Sturlunga saga.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡlæmə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡlæmɚ/

Noun

glamour (countable and uncountable, plural glamours)

  1. (uncountable) Originally, enchantment; magic charm; especially, the effect of a spell that causes one to see objects in a form that differs from reality, typically to make filthy, ugly, or repulsive things seems beauteous.
    • 1882, James Thomson (B. V.), “The City of Dreadful Night”:
      They often murmur to themselves, they speak
      To one another seldom, for their woe
      Broods maddening inwardly and scorns to wreak
      Itself abroad; and if at whiles it grow
      To frenzy which must rave, none heeds the clamour,
      Unless there waits some victim of like glamour,
      To rave in turn, who lends attentive show.
  2. (uncountable) Alluring beauty or charm (often with sex appeal).
    glamour magazines; a glamour model
  3. (uncountable) Any excitement, appeal, or attractiveness associated with a person, place, or thing; that which makes something appealing.
    The idea of being a movie star has lost its glamour for me.
  4. Any artificial interest in, or association with, an object, or person, through which it or they appear delusively magnified or glorified.
  5. A kind of haze in the air, causing things to appear different from what they really are.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  6. (countable) An item, motif, person, image that by association improves appearance.

Alternative forms

  • glamor (US); however, the -our spelling is the more common spelling, even in the US

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

glamour (third-person singular simple present glamours, present participle glamouring, simple past and past participle glamoured)

  1. (transitive) To enchant; to bewitch.

References

  • “Glámr” in: Richard Cleasby, Guðbrandur Vigfússon — An Icelandic-English Dictionary (1874)

Danish

Etymology

From English glamour.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlamuːr/, [ɡ̊laˈmuːɐ̯] or IPA(key): /ɡlamɔr/, [ˈɡ̊lamɒ]

Noun

glamour c (singular definite glamouren, not used in plural form)

  1. glamour

Derived terms

  • glamourisere
  • glamourøs

Finnish

Noun

glamour

  1. glamour (charm)

Declension


French

Noun

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. glamour

Adjective

glamour (invariable)

  1. glamorous

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English glamour

Noun

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related terms

  • glamorøs

References

  • “glamour” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English glamour

Noun

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related terms

  • glamorøs

References

  • “glamour” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

From English glamour.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlaˈmuɾ/, [ɡlaˈmuɾ]

Noun

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of glamur

Further reading

  • “glamour” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Noun

glamour c (definite singular glamouren) (uncountable)

  1. glamour


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wĭch, IPA(key): /wɪtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ
  • Homophone: which (in accents with the wine-whine merger), wich, wych

Etymology 1

From Middle English wicche, from Old English wiċċe (witch (female), sorceress) and wiċċa (witch (male), sorcerer, warlock), deverbative from wiċċian (to practice sorcery), from Proto-Germanic *wikkōną (compare West Frisian wikje, wikke (to foretell, warn), German Low German wicken (to soothsay), Dutch wikken, wichelen (to dowse, divine)), from Proto-Indo-European *wik-néh₂-, derivation of *weyk- (to consecrate; separate); akin to Latin victima (sacrificial victim), Lithuanian viẽkas (life-force), Sanskrit विनक्ति (vinákti, to set apart, separate out).

Noun

witch (plural witches)

  1. A person who practices witchcraft.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:witch.
    1. (now usually particularly) A woman who is learned in and actively practices witchcraft.
  2. (derogatory) An ugly or unpleasant woman.
  3. One who exercises more-than-common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person.
  4. One given to mischief, especially a woman or child.
  5. (geometry) A certain curve of the third order, described by Maria Agnesi under the name versiera.
  6. The stormy petrel.
  7. Any of a number of flatfish:
    1. Glyptocephalus cynoglossus (Torbay sole), found in the North Atlantic.
    2. Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis (megrim), found in the North Atlantic.
    3. Arnoglossus scapha, found near New Zealand.
  8. The Indomalayan butterfly Araotes lapithis, of the family Lycaenidae.
Synonyms
  • (person who uses magic): See Thesaurus:magician
  • (female magic user): wizardess, sorceress
  • (male magic user): wizard, sorcerer, warlock
  • (an ugly or unpleasant woman): See Thesaurus:old woman or Thesaurus:ugly woman or Thesaurus:shrew
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • Arnoglossus scapha on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Arnoglossus scapha on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Arnoglossus scapha on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Verb

witch (third-person singular simple present witches, present participle witching, simple past and past participle witched)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To practise witchcraft.
  2. (transitive) To bewitch.
    • 2012, Carol Berg, The Daemon Prism: A Novel of the Collegia Magica, Penguin (→ISBN)
      The little man was seething and shaking, near collapse with fear and anger. “Tell ’em, Alvy.” “A tenday ago, Will came to the Cockatoo acting crazy, so scared he’d pissed hisself. Said the sorcerer had found him in the stables and witched him.”
    • 2014, Charles L. McNichols, Crazy Weather, Counterpoint Press (→ISBN)
      “Maybe the Mormonhater witched him. There’s lot of stories being told around about that old man.” “Them’s lies,” denied South Boy hotly. “He may have scared Havek, but he never witched him.”
    • 2017, Benjamin R. Kracht, Kiowa Belief and Ritual, U of Nebraska Press (→ISBN), page 134:
      Sometime in 1945 he faced an opponent who apparently “witched” him, causing facial paralysis and dizzy spells that rendered him bedridden. An old Indian doctor came to his bedside, looked into his eyes, and proclaimed that he had been witched by his Seminole adversary.
  3. (intransitive) To dowse for water.
Derived terms
  • witcher

See also

References

Etymology 2

Compare wick.

Noun

witch (plural witches)

  1. A cone of paper which is placed in a vessel of lard or other fat and used as a taper.

Scots

Alternative forms

  • wutch, whitch

Etymology

From Middle English wicche, from Old English wiċċe (witch (female),sorceress) and wiċċa (witch (male), sorcerer) m., deverbative from wiċċian (to practice sorcery), from Proto-Germanic *wikkōną (compare West Frisian wikje, wikke (to foretell, warn), German Low German wicken (to soothsay), Dutch wikken, wichelen (to dowse, divine)), from Proto-Indo-European *wik-néh₂-, derivation of *weyk- (to consecrate; separate); akin to Latin victima (sacrificial victim), Lithuanian viẽkas (life-force), Sanskrit विनक्ति (vinákti, to set apart, separate out).

Noun

witch (plural witchs)

  1. witch; A person, chiefly a woman, skilled in sorcery.
    1. warlock
  2. (transferred) Various animals, insects and objects in some way associated with witches.
    1. A moth in general; a tortoiseshell butterfly.
    2. The pole flounder or dab, Glyptocephalus cynoglossus.
    3. The seaweed, Laminaria saccharina.
    4. A red clay marble, generally one that is considered effective in winning games, a “wizard”.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Verb

witch (third-person singular present, present participle witching, past witchit, past participle witchit)

  1. (transitive) To harm (a person, etc.) by means of witchcraft; to bewitch, cast a spell on.
  2. (figuratively) To affect or influence as by witchcraft.

Further reading

  • “witch” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.


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