glance vs glimpse what difference

what is difference between glance and glimpse

English

Alternative forms

  • glaunce (obsolete)

Etymology

From a conflation of Middle English glacen (to graze, strike a glancing blow) and Middle English glenten (to look askance). Middle English glacen came from Old French glacier (to slip, make slippery), which was a derivative of glace (ice). Middle English glenten was derived from Old Norse *glenta (to shine; look), which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *glintaną (to shine; look). Middle English glenten is also the source of glint.

The form of the modern word takes largely after its Latinate parent, save for the medial -n-. On the other hand, the most common sense in modern usage, “to look briefly (at something)”, comes from its Germanic parent. The sense “to sparkle” does as well. Most other senses derive from Middle English glacen.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡlɑːns/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡlæns/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːns, -æns

Verb

glance (third-person singular simple present glances, present participle glancing, simple past and past participle glanced)

  1. (intransitive) To look briefly (at something).
    She glanced at her reflection as she passed the mirror.
  2. (intransitive) To graze at a surface.
  3. To sparkle.
    The spring sunlight was glancing on the water of the pond.
    • From art, from nature, from the schools, / Let random influences glance, / Like light in many a shivered lance, / That breaks about the dappled pools.
  4. (intransitive) To move quickly, appearing and disappearing rapidly; to be visible only for an instant at a time; to move interruptedly; to twinkle.
  5. (intransitive) To strike and fly off in an oblique direction; to dart aside.
    • 1833, Mary Shelley, The Mortal Immortal
      I started — I dropped the glass — the fluid flamed and glanced along the floor, while I felt Cornelius’s gripe at my throat, as he shrieked aloud, “Wretch! you have destroyed the labour of my life!”
  6. (soccer) To hit lightly with the head, make a deft header.
  7. To make an incidental or passing reflection; to allude; to hint; often with at.
  8. (ichthyology) A type of interaction between parent fish and offspring in which juveniles swim toward and rapidly touch the sides of the parent, in most cases feeding on parental mucus. Relatively few species glance, mainly some Cichlidae.

Synonyms

  • (To see something briefly): see

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

glance (countable and uncountable, plural glances)

  1. A brief or cursory look.
  2. A deflection.
  3. (cricket) A stroke in which the ball is deflected to one side.
  4. A sudden flash of light or splendour.
  5. An incidental or passing thought or allusion.
    • c. 1782, William Cowper, The Solitude of Alexander Selkirk
      How fleet is a glance of the mind.
  6. (mineralogy) Any of various sulphides, mostly dark-coloured, which have a brilliant metallic lustre.
  7. (mineralogy) Glance coal.
Derived terms

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • glinse
  • glimse (obsolete)

Etymology

From earlier glimse, from Middle English glimsen (to glisten, be dazzling, glance with the eyes), akin to Middle High German glimsen (to glow, smoulder), Middle High German glinsen (to shine, glimmer), Middle Dutch glinsen and Middle Low German glinsen, glintzen, glinzen (to shine, shimmer), Dutch glinsteren (to glitter, sparkle, shimmer, glint, glance).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɪmps/
  • Rhymes: -ɪmps

Noun

glimpse (plural glimpses)

  1. A brief look, glance, or peek.
    • 1798, Samuel Rogers, An Epistle to a Friend
      Here hid by shrub-wood, there by glimpses seen.
    • Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody’s exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.
  2. A sudden flash.
  3. A faint idea; an inkling.

Translations

Verb

glimpse (third-person singular simple present glimpses, present participle glimpsing, simple past and past participle glimpsed)

  1. (transitive) To see or view briefly or incompletely.
  2. (intransitive) To appear by glimpses.
    • 1596, Michael Drayton, Mortimeriados
      Deformed Shaddowes glimpsing in his sight

Synonyms

  • perceive, notice, detect, espy, spot, catch sight of

Translations

Anagrams

  • megilps

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