glide vs sailing what difference

what is difference between glide and sailing

English

Etymology

From Middle English gliden, from Old English glīdan, from Proto-West Germanic *glīdan, from Proto-Germanic *glīdaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰleydʰ-.

Cognate with West Frisian glide, glydzje, Low German glieden, Dutch glijden, German gleiten, Norwegian Nynorsk gli, Danish glide, Swedish glida.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlaɪd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Verb

glide (third-person singular simple present glides, present participle gliding, simple past glided or glid or (archaic) glode, past participle glided or glid or glidden or (archaic) glode)

  1. (intransitive) To move softly, smoothly, or effortlessly.
    • 1807, William Wordsworth, Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, in Poems, in Two Volumes (Sonnet 14):
      The river glideth at his own sweet will:
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter VI:
      The water over which the boats glided was black and smooth, rising into huge foamless billows, the more terrible because they were silent.
  2. (intransitive) To fly unpowered, as of an aircraft. Also relates to gliding birds and flying fish.
  3. (transitive) To cause to glide.
  4. (phonetics) To pass with a glide, as the voice.

Synonyms

  • (to move effortlessly): coast, slide

Translations

Noun

glide (plural glides)

  1. The act of gliding.
  2. (phonology) A transitional sound, especially a semivowel.
    Synonyms: semivowel, semiconsonant
  3. (fencing) An attack or preparatory movement made by sliding down the opponent’s blade, keeping it in constant contact.
  4. A bird, the glede or kite.
  5. A kind of cap affixed to the base of the legs of furniture to prevent it from damaging the floor.
  6. The joining of two sounds without a break.
  7. A smooth and sliding step in dancing the waltz.

Related terms

  • glider
  • gliding
  • offglide, off-glide
  • onglide, on-glide

Translations

Anagrams

  • gelid, lidge, liged

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • glida (a infinitive)
  • gli (short form)

Etymology

From Middle Low German gliden

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²ɡliːə/

Verb

glide (present tense glid, past tense gleid, past participle glidd or glitt or glide, present participle glidande, imperative glid)

  1. to slip (to lose one’s traction on a slippery surface)
  2. to glide (to move effortlessly)

References

  • “glide” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Volapük

Noun

glide

  1. dative singular of glid

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian glīda, from Proto-West Germanic *glīdan, from Proto-Germanic *glīdaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlidə/, /ˈɡliːdə/

Verb

glide

  1. to glide, to slide

Inflection

Further reading

  • “glide”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪ.lɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪlɪŋ

Etymology 1

Verb

sailing

  1. present participle of sail

Etymology 2

From Middle English saylinge, seilinge, variants of sailende, seilende; equivalent to sail +‎ -ing.

Adjective

sailing (not comparable)

  1. Travelling by ship.

Derived terms

  • sailing boat
  • sailing ship
  • sailing dinghy
  • sailing vessel

Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English sailyng, seyling; equivalent to sail +‎ -ing.

Noun

sailing (countable and uncountable, plural sailings)

  1. Motion across a body of water in a craft powered by the wind, as a sport or otherwise
  2. Navigation; the skill needed to operate and navigate a vessel
  3. the time of departure from a port
  4. (countable) a scheduled voyage by a ferry or ship.

Derived terms

  • clear sailing
  • plain sailing

Translations

References

  • “sailing”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • Gilanis, ailings, aisling, nilgais

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