glint vs peek what difference

what is difference between glint and peek

English

Etymology

15th century. Borrowed from Scots glint; from Middle English glenten (to shine, gleam; flash); probably alteration of Old Norse [Term?]; from Middle High German glinzen; from Proto-Germanic *glintaną, *glintjaną; from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰley- (to shine). Cognate with Swedish glänta, glinta (to slip, slide, gleam, shine), Swedish glimt. Reintroduced into literary English by Robert Burns.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɪnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Noun

glint (plural glints)

  1. A short flash of light.
    I saw the glint of metal as he raised the gun.

Translations

Adjective

glint (comparative more glint, superlative most glint)

  1. (archaic, Shropshire, of a blade) Not sharp; dull.
    The knife is glint.

Verb

glint (third-person singular simple present glints, present participle glinting, simple past and past participle glinted)

  1. (intransitive) To flash or gleam briefly.
    A wedding ring glinted on her finger.
  2. (intransitive) To glance; to peep forth, as a flower from the bud; to glitter.
    • 1785, Robert Burns, The Holy Fair
      The rising sun owre Galston muirs, / Wi’ glorious light was glintin’
  3. (transitive) To cause to flash or gleam; to reflect.
    • 1980, Inquiry Magazine
      The scientists theorized that a meteoroid, ranging in size from a speck of dust to a marble, might have struck the satellite and chipped off a bit of debris that glinted a ray of sun back on the Vela’s second sensor []
  4. (archaic, Shropshire, transitive) To dry; to wither.
    The sun glints grass and corn.

Translations

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1900) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 2, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pages 644–645



English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pēk, IPA(key): /piːk/
    Homophones: peak, peke, pique
  • Rhymes: -iːk

Alternative forms

  • peak, peke (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From Middle English *peken, piken, pyken (to peep), probably a fusion of Middle English pepen (to peep) and keken, kiken (to keek, look, spy), equivalent to a blend of peep +‎ keek.

Verb

peek (third-person singular simple present peeks, present participle peeking, simple past and past participle peeked)

  1. (informal) To look slyly, or with the eyes half closed, or through a crevice; to peep.
  2. (informal) To be only slightly, partially visible, as if peering out from a hiding place.
  3. (computing, transitive) To retrieve (a value) from a memory address.
    • 2006, Gary Willoughby, PureBasic: A Beginner’s Guide to Computer Programming (page 279)
      We are peeking the value from the first index’s memory location.
Derived terms
  • peekable
Translations

Noun

peek (plural peeks)

  1. A quick glance or look.
Derived terms
  • sneak peek

Etymology 2

Noun

peek

  1. Misspelling of pique.

Anagrams

  • Ekpe, Keep, Peke, keep, kepe, peke

Basque

Noun

peek

  1. ergative plural of pe

Hlai

Etymology

From Proto-Hlai *pʰaːk (high), from Pre-Hlai *paːk (Norquest, 2015).

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Hlai) IPA(key): /pʰeːk˥/

Adjective

peek

  1. high

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