Globe vs Sphere what difference

what is difference between Globe and Sphere

English

Etymology

From late Middle English globe, from Middle French globe, from Old French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡləʊb/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡloʊb/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ɡloːb/
  • Rhymes: -əʊb

Noun

globe (plural globes)

  1. Any spherical (or nearly spherical) object.
  2. The planet Earth.
    • 1866, John Locke, A System of Theology
      But whatever opinion or theory may be formed by any one, all agree that at some period or other this world has been destroyed by water, and that the proofs of this assertion are found in every part of the globe
  3. A spherical model of Earth or any planet.
  4. (dated or Australia, South Africa) A light bulb.
    • 1920, Southern Pacific Company, Southern Pacific bulletin: volumes 9-10 (page 26)
      Don’t ask for a new globe just because the old one needs dusting. The old-style carbon lamps wasted electricity when they began to fade and it was economy to replace them.
  5. A circular military formation used in Ancient Rome, corresponding to the modern infantry square.
  6. (slang, chiefly in the plural) A woman’s breast.
  7. (obsolete) A group.

Synonyms

  • (The Earth): Earth, world, Terra, Sol III

Derived terms

  • globe-trotter
  • show globe
  • snowglobe
  • hemoglobin

Related terms

  • global
  • globular

Translations

Verb

globe (third-person singular simple present globes, present participle globing, simple past and past participle globed)

  1. (intransitive) To become spherical.
  2. (transitive) To make spherical.

Anagrams

  • Belgo-, Bogle, Gobel, Goble, bogle

Danish

Etymology

From French globe, from Latin globus (sphere, globe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡloːbə/, [ˈɡ̊loːb̥ə]

Noun

globe c (singular definite globen, plural indefinite glober)

  1. globe

Inflection

Synonyms

  • globus c

Derived terms

  • globetrotter c

French

Etymology

From Middle French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɔb/

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. globe

Derived terms

  • englober
  • globe terrestre
  • globe-trotter

Related terms

  • global

Further reading

  • “globe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Noun

globe

  1. vocative singular of globus

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin globus.

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. roll (of paper, etc.)
  2. globe (sphere showing a representation of the Earth)

Descendants

  • English: globe
  • French: globe

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe, supplement)


English

Alternative forms

  • sphære (archaic)
  • sphear (archaic)
  • spheare (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English spere, from Old French sphere, from Late Latin sphēra, earlier Latin sphaera (ball, globe, celestial sphere), from Ancient Greek σφαῖρα (sphaîra, ball, globe), of unknown origin. Not related to superficially similar Persian سپهر(sepehr, sky) (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /sfɪə/
  • (US) enPR: sfîr, IPA(key): /sfɪɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)

Noun

sphere (plural spheres)

  1. (mathematics) A regular three-dimensional object in which every cross-section is a circle; the figure described by the revolution of a circle about its diameter [from 14th c.].
  2. A spherical physical object; a globe or ball. [from 14th c.]
    • 2011, Piers Sellers, The Guardian, 6 July:
      So your orientation changes a little bit but it sinks in that the world is a sphere, and you’re going around it, sometimes under it, sideways, or over it.
  3. (astronomy, now rare) The apparent outer limit of space; the edge of the heavens, imagined as a hollow globe within which celestial bodies appear to be embedded. [from 14th c.]
    • 1635, John Donne, “His parting form her”:
      Though cold and darkness longer hang somewhere, / Yet Phoebus equally lights all the Sphere.
  4. (historical, astronomy, mythology) Any of the concentric hollow transparent globes formerly believed to rotate around the Earth, and which carried the heavenly bodies; there were originally believed to be eight, and later nine and ten; friction between them was thought to cause a harmonious sound (the music of the spheres). [from 14th c.]
    • , vol.1, p.153:
      It is more simplicitie to teach our children [] [t]he knowledge of the starres, and the motion of the eighth spheare, before their owne.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, I.6:
      They understood not the motion of the eighth sphear from West to East, and so conceived the longitude of the Stars invariable.
  5. (mythology) An area of activity for a planet; or by extension, an area of influence for a god, hero etc. [from 14th c.]
  6. (figuratively) The region in which something or someone is active; one’s province, domain. [from 17th c.]
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.20:
      They thought – originally on grounds derived from religion – that each thing or person had its or his proper sphere, to overstep which is ‘unjust’.
  7. (geometry) The set of all points in three-dimensional Euclidean space (or n-dimensional space, in topology) that are a fixed distance from a fixed point [from 20th c.].
  8. (logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.

Synonyms

  • (object): ball, globe, orb
  • (region of activity): area, domain, field, orbit, sector
  • (in geometry): 3-sphere (geometry), 2-sphere (topology)
  • (astronomy: apparent surface of the heavens): See celestial sphere
  • (astronomy: anything visible on the apparent surface of the heavens): See celestial body

Derived terms

  • blogosphere
  • ensphere
  • sphere of influence
  • sphere of interest

Related terms

  • atmosphere
  • hemisphere
  • ionosphere
  • planisphere
  • spherical
  • spheroid
  • stratosphere
  • troposphere

Translations

Verb

sphere (third-person singular simple present spheres, present participle sphering, simple past and past participle sphered)

  1. (transitive) To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to ensphere.
  2. (transitive) To make round or spherical; to perfect.

See also

  • ball (in topology)
  • Mathworld article on the sphere
  • PlanetMath article on the sphere

Anagrams

  • Hesper, herpes, pesher, pheers

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • sphaere
  • spere

Noun

sphere f (plural spheres)

  1. sphere (shape)

Descendants

  • French: sphère

Old French

Alternative forms

  • espere
  • esphere
  • spere

Noun

sphere f (oblique plural spheres, nominative singular sphere, nominative plural spheres)

  1. sphere (shape)

Descendants

  • English: sphere
  • French: sphère

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (sphere, supplement)

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