globe vs world what difference

what is difference between globe and world

English

Etymology

From late Middle English globe, from Middle French globe, from Old French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡləʊb/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡloʊb/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ɡloːb/
  • Rhymes: -əʊb

Noun

globe (plural globes)

  1. Any spherical (or nearly spherical) object.
  2. The planet Earth.
    • 1866, John Locke, A System of Theology
      But whatever opinion or theory may be formed by any one, all agree that at some period or other this world has been destroyed by water, and that the proofs of this assertion are found in every part of the globe
  3. A spherical model of Earth or any planet.
  4. (dated or Australia, South Africa) A light bulb.
    • 1920, Southern Pacific Company, Southern Pacific bulletin: volumes 9-10 (page 26)
      Don’t ask for a new globe just because the old one needs dusting. The old-style carbon lamps wasted electricity when they began to fade and it was economy to replace them.
  5. A circular military formation used in Ancient Rome, corresponding to the modern infantry square.
  6. (slang, chiefly in the plural) A woman’s breast.
  7. (obsolete) A group.

Synonyms

  • (The Earth): Earth, world, Terra, Sol III

Derived terms

  • globe-trotter
  • show globe
  • snowglobe
  • hemoglobin

Related terms

  • global
  • globular

Translations

Verb

globe (third-person singular simple present globes, present participle globing, simple past and past participle globed)

  1. (intransitive) To become spherical.
  2. (transitive) To make spherical.

Anagrams

  • Belgo-, Bogle, Gobel, Goble, bogle

Danish

Etymology

From French globe, from Latin globus (sphere, globe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡloːbə/, [ˈɡ̊loːb̥ə]

Noun

globe c (singular definite globen, plural indefinite glober)

  1. globe

Inflection

Synonyms

  • globus c

Derived terms

  • globetrotter c

French

Etymology

From Middle French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɔb/

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. globe

Derived terms

  • englober
  • globe terrestre
  • globe-trotter

Related terms

  • global

Further reading

  • “globe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Noun

globe

  1. vocative singular of globus

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin globus.

Noun

globe m (plural globes)

  1. roll (of paper, etc.)
  2. globe (sphere showing a representation of the Earth)

Descendants

  • English: globe
  • French: globe

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe, supplement)


English

Alternative forms

  • vurld (Bermuda)

Etymology

From Middle English world, weoreld, from Old English weorold (world), from Proto-West Germanic *weraldi, from Proto-Germanic *weraldiz (lifetime, human existence, world, literally age/era of man), equivalent to wer (man) +‎ eld (age). Cognate with Scots warld (world), Saterland Frisian Waareld (world), West Frisian wrâld (world),
Afrikaans wêreld (world), Dutch wereld (world), Low German Werld (world), German Welt (world), Norwegian Bokmål verden (world), Norwegian Nynorsk verd (world), Swedish värld (world), Icelandic veröld (the world).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɜːld/
  • (General American, Canada) enPR: wûrld, IPA(key): /wɝld/
  • (General New Zealand) enPR: wûrld, IPA(key): /wɵːld/, [wɵːɯ̯d̥]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)ld
  • Homophones: whirled, whorled (both only in accents with the wine-whine merger and the fern-fir-fur merger)

Noun

world (countable and uncountable, plural worlds)

  1. (with “the” or a plural possessive pronoun) The subjective human experience, regarded collectively. Human collective existence; existence in general.
  2. (with “the” or a singular possessive pronoun) The subjective human experience, regarded individually.
  3. (with “the”) A majority of people.
    The world hated the 2019 Cats movie.
    Running after God is the only life worth living. Even though the world believes that living for God is boring, we believe that there is nothing more exciting.
  4. The Universe.
  5. (uncountable, with “the”) The Earth.
    Synonyms: the earth, Earth, the globe, God’s green earth, Sol III
    “As the world turns, we know the bleakness of winter, the promise of spring, the fullness of summer and the harvest of autumn–the cycle of life is complete.” – quotation attributed to Irna Phillips.
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      She says the Third Pole is one of the world’s largest sources of fresh drinking water.
  6. (countable) A planet, especially one which is inhabited or inhabitable.
    • 2007 September 27, Marc Rayman (interviewee), “NASA’s Ion-Drive Asteroid Hunter Lifts Off”, National Public Radio:
      I think many people think of asteroids as kind of little chips of rock. But the places that Dawn is going to really are more like worlds.
    1. (by extension) Any other astronomical body which may be inhabitable, such as a natural satellite.
  7. A very large extent of country.
    the New World
  8. (fiction, speculation) A realm, such as a planet, containing one or multiple societies of beings, especially intelligent ones.
    the world of Narnia; the Wizarding World of Harry Potter; a zombie world
  9. An individual or group perspective or social setting.
    Synonym: circle
    Welcome to my world.
  10. (computing) The part of an operating system distributed with the kernel, consisting of the shell and other programs.
  11. (video games) A subdivision of a game, consisting of a series of stages or levels that usually share a similar environment or theme.
    Have you reached the boss at the end of the ice world?
    There’s a hidden warp to the next world down this pipe.
  12. (tarot) The twenty-second trump or major arcana card of the tarot.
  13. (informal, singular or plural, followed by “of”) A great amount.
    Taking a break from work seems to have done her a world of good.
    You’re going to be in a world of trouble when your family finds out.
  14. (archaic) Age, era.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

world (third-person singular simple present worlds, present participle worlding, simple past and past participle worlded)

  1. To consider or cause to be considered from a global perspective; to consider as a global whole, rather than making or focussing on national or other distinctions; compare globalise.
    • 1996, Jan Jindy Pettman, Worlding Women: A feminist international politics, pages ix-x:
      There are by now many feminisms (Tong, 1989; Humm, 1992). […] They are in shifting alliance or contest with postmodern critiques, which at times seem to threaten the very category ‘women’ and its possibilities for a feminist politics. These debates inform this attempt at worlding women—moving beyond white western power centres and their dominant knowledges (compare Spivak, 1985), while recognising that I, as a white settler-state woman, need to attend to differences between women, too.
    • 2005, James Phillips, Heidegger’s Volk: Between National Socialism and Poetry, published by Stanford University Press, →ISBN:
      In a sense, the dictatorship was a failure of failure and, on that account, it was perhaps the exemplary system of control. Having in 1933 wagered on the worlding of the world in the regime’s failure, Heidegger after the war can only rue his opportunistic hopes for an exposure of the ontological foundations of control.
  2. To make real; to make worldly.

See also

  • global
  • globalisation, globalization

Anagrams

  • l-word

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • worild, wordle, werld, woreld, worlde, woruld, weoreld

Etymology

From Old English woruld, worold, from Proto-West Germanic *weraldi, from Proto-Germanic *weraldiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wurld/, /wɛrld/

Noun

world (plural worldes)

  1. The world, the planet (i.e., Earth)
  2. A dimension, realm, or existence, especially human existence.
  3. The trappings and features of human life.
  4. The political entities of the world.
  5. The people of the world, especially when judging someone.
  6. An age, era or epoch.
  7. The universe, the totality of existence.

Related terms

  • worldly

Descendants

  • English: world
  • Scots: warld

References

  • “world, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-20.

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