glop vs mush what difference

what is difference between glop and mush

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɒp/

Etymology 1

Variation of glope.

Verb

glop (third-person singular simple present glops, present participle glopping, simple past and past participle glopped)

  1. (dialectal or archaic) To stare in amazement.

Etymology 2

1940-45, of expressive origin. Compare goop, gulp.

Noun

glop (countable and uncountable, plural glops)

  1. (informal, uncountable) Any gooey substance.
  2. (informal, countable) A gooey blob of some substance.
    • 2015, Kristen L. Middleton, W. J. May, Suzy Turner, Darlings of Darkness
      Kylarai studied me as I picked a glop of mascara from one lash.

Translations

Verb

glop (third-person singular simple present glops, present participle glopping, simple past and past participle glopped)

  1. (transitive, informal) To apply (a liquid) thickly and messily.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To swallow greedily.

Derived terms

  • gloppy

Catalan

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɡlop/

Noun

glop m (plural glops)

  1. gulp, sip

Derived terms

  • glopet

Dutch

Etymology

Related to West Frisian gloppe (alley), Old Norse gloppa (mountain gorge), Norwegian glop (opening, hole), Icelandic glopa, Faroese gloppa (ajar); per Kroonen, all from Proto-Germanic *gluppa (open space), a derivative of *gluppōn (yawning, being open), from Pre-Germanic *glub-n-, *glub-, from which also gleuf (slit, opening).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣlɔp/
  • Hyphenation: glop
  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Noun

glop n (plural gloppen, diminutive glopje n)

  1. (Northern, dialectal) opening, hole, crevice
  2. (Holland, dialectal) alley, narrow passage, narrow street
  3. (Northern, dialectal) open space, clearing

Further reading

  • van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “glop”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

References

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013), “gluppa”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 181-82


English

Etymology 1

Probably a variant of mash, or from a dialectal variant of Middle English mos (mush, pulp, porridge); compare Middle English appelmos (applesauce), from Old English mōs (food, victuals, porridge, mush), from Proto-West Germanic *mōs, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (porridge, food), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d- (wet, fat, dripping). Cognate with Scots moosh (mush), Dutch moes (pulp, mush, porridge), German Mus (jam, puree, mush), Swedish mos (pulp, mash, mush). See also moose.

Alternative forms

  • moosh

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: mŭsh, IPA(key): /mʌʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /mʊʃ/
  • ,
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ
  • Rhymes: -ʊʃ

Noun

mush (countable and uncountable, plural mushes)

  1. A somewhat liquid mess, often of food; a soft or semisolid substance.
  2. (radio) A mixture of noise produced by the harmonics of continuous-wave stations.
  3. (surfing) The foam of a breaker.
    • 2008, Bucky McMahon, Night Diver (page 80)
      And Rincon was all about surfing. Flash back thirty-odd years, to a skinny kid on a Styrofoam belly-board, pin-wheeling out into the mush of Jacksonville Beach, Florida.
  4. (geology) A magmatic body containing a significant proportion of crystals suspended in the liquid phase or melt.
Translations

Verb

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. To squish so as to break into smaller pieces or to combine with something else.
    He mushed the ingredients together.
Translations

Derived terms

  • apple-mush
  • mushy

See also

  • mash
  • moosh

Etymology 2

From Old High German muos and Goidelic mus (a pap) or muss (a porridge), or any thick preparation of fruit.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: mŭsh, IPA(key): /mʌʃ/
  • ,
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Noun

mush (countable and uncountable, plural mushes)

  1. A food comprising cracked or rolled grains cooked in water or milk; porridge.
  2. (rural US) Cornmeal cooked in water and served as a porridge or as a thick sidedish like grits or mashed potatoes.
    • 2007, Andrew F. Smith, The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink
      However, they did make and sometimes even bake cornmeal mushes that could be either sweetened or fortified with fat.
Translations

Etymology 3

Believed to be a contraction of mush on, from Michif, in turn a corruption of French marchons! and marche!, the cry of the voyageurs and coureurs de bois to their dogs.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: mŭsh, IPA(key): /mʌʃ/, /mʊʃ/
  • ,
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Interjection

mush

  1. A directive given (usually to dogs or a horse) to start moving, or to move faster.
Translations
Derived terms
  • musher

Noun

mush (plural mushes)

  1. A walk, especially across the snow with dogs.

Verb

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. (intransitive) To walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  2. (transitive) To drive dogs, usually pulling a sled, across the snow.
    • 1910, Jack London, Burning Daylight, part 1 chapter 4:
      Together the two men loaded and lashed the sled. They warmed their hands for the last time, pulled on their mittens, and mushed the dogs over the bank and down to the river-trail.

Etymology 4

Simple contraction of mushroom.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: mŭsh, IPA(key): /mʌʃ/
  • ,
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Noun

mush (plural mushes)

  1. (Quebec, slang) A magic mushroom.
Synonyms
  • shroom (slang)
Translations

Etymology 5

From Angloromani mush (man), from Romani mursh, from Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya, human being, man).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: mo͝osh, IPA(key): /mʊʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊʃ

Noun

mush (plural mushes)

  1. (Britain, slang, chiefly Southern England) A form of address, normally to a man.
    Synonyms: (UK) mate, (especially US) pal
  2. (Britain, slang, chiefly Northern England, Australia) The face.
    Synonym: mug
Translations

References

  • Take Our Word for It Issue 101, accessed on 2005-05-09

Etymology 6

Compare French moucheter (to cut with small cuts).

Verb

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. (transitive) To notch, cut, or indent (cloth, etc.) with a stamp.

Anagrams

  • HUMs, Hums, Shum, hums

Angloromani

Etymology

From Romani murś, from Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya, human being, man).

Noun

mush (plural mushes)

  1. man

Descendants

  • English: mush

References

  • “mush” in The Manchester Romani Project, Angloromani Dictionary.

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