glorious vs splendiferous what difference

what is difference between glorious and splendiferous

English

Etymology

From Middle English glorious, from Anglo-Norman glorius and Old French glorïos, from Latin glōriōsus. Displaced native Middle English wulderful, from Old English wuldorfull (glorious), among other terms. Equivalent to glory +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔː.ɹi.əs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔɹ.i.əs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːɹiəs

Adjective

glorious (comparative more glorious or gloriouser, superlative most glorious or gloriousest)

  1. Exhibiting attributes, qualities, or acts that are worthy of or receive glory.
    glorious deeds
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act III, Scene III, line 351:
      Farewell the neighing steed, and the shrill trump, / The spirit-stirring drum, th’ ear-piercing fife, / The royal banner, and all quality, / Pride, pomp and circumstance of glorious war!
  2. Excellent, wonderful; delightful.
    • Borini missed another glorious opportunity to give his side the lead after brilliant set-up play by Sterling, but with only the exposed keeper to beat, he struck the post.
  3. Bright or shining;
    Synonyms: splendid, resplendent, bright, shining
    • 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part II, Act III, Scene I, line 351
      And this fell tempest shall not cease to rage / Until the golden circuit on my head, / Like to the glorious sun’s transparent beams, / Do calm the fury of this mad-bred flaw.
  4. (obsolete) Eager for glory or distinction
    Synonyms: haughty, boastful, ostentatious, vainglorious
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act I, Scene VI, line 6:
      […] but most miserable / Is the desire that’s glorious: blest be those, / How mean soe’er, that have their honest wills, / Which seasons comfort. […]
  5. (archaic, colloquial) Ecstatic; hilarious; elated with drink.
    • […] kings may be blest, but Tam was glorious, O’er all the ills of life victorious.

Derived terms

  • gloriousness

Related terms

  • glorify
  • glory

Translations


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • glorius, gloryis, gloryous, gloriose

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman glorius, glorios, glorieus, from Latin glōriōsus; equivalent to glory +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔːriuːs/, /ˈɡlɔːrjuːs/, /ˈɡlɔːrius/, /ˈɡlɔːriəs/

Adjective

glorious (comparative gloriousere, superlative gloriosest)

  1. Recognised, acclaimed, well-known; having an excellent reputation.
  2. Deserving religious recognition or commendation; godly.
  3. Marvelous or wonderful to the senses: attractive, pleasing.
  4. Amazing, great; bearing good quality or reputation.
  5. (rare) Vain, bragging, self-aggrandising.

Related terms

  • gloriously

Descendants

  • English: glorious

References

  • “glōriǒus, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-10-04.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • glorieus, glorios, glorius

Etymology

Latin glōriōsus.

Adjective

glorious m (oblique and nominative feminine singular gloriouse) (Anglo-Norman)

  1. glorious

Declension



English

Etymology

From Medieval Latin splendorifer, from Latin splendor + fero (to bear), reintroduced humorously into English c. 1837.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /splɛnˈdɪfəɹəs/

Adjective

splendiferous (comparative more splendiferous, superlative most splendiferous)

  1. beautiful, splendid
    • c. 1460, George Ashby, “Dicta & opiniones diversorum philosophorum”, 149, in George Ashby’s Poems, edited by Mary Bateson, 1899.
      Who that is wele cherisshed with a king And is with hym grete & splendiferous.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Chapter 14 “Oxen of the Sun”
      You move a motion? Steve boy, you’re going it some. More bluggy drunkables? Will immensely splendiferous stander permit one stooder of most extreme poverty and one largesize grandacious thirst to terminate one expensive inaugurated libation?
    • 2004, Neal Stephenson, The Confusion, p. 178
      …he was trying to convince the Spaniards on the Viceroy’s brig that they really ought to be interested in certain splendiferous goods that he, Mr. Foot, the owner and captain of this galleot, had of late brought out of the Orient–particularly, carpets.

Translations

References

“Splendiferous” in John Russell Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms: A Glossary of Words and Phrases Usually Regarded as Peculiar to the United States, Fourth Edition, Little, Brown, and Company (1887), page 637:

Splendiferous.   Splendid; fine.   A factitious word used only in jest.

To my mind, a splendiferous woman and a first-chop horse are the noblest works of creation. — Sam Slick, Human Nature, p. 280.
There’s something so fascinating in the first blush of evening that it’s enough to make a man strip off his jacket of mortality, and swim through the gulf of death, for the sake of reaching the splendiferous splendors that decorate the opposite shore. — Dow’s Sermons, Vol. I. p. 69.
An itinerant gospeller was holding forth to a Kentuckian audience, on the kingdom of heaven:—
“Heaven, my beloved hearers,” said he, “is a glorious, a beautiful, a splendiferous, an angeliferous place. Eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, it has not entered into the imagination of any Cracker in these here diggings what carryings on the just made perfect have up thar.”
It is singular that Drayton, the poet of Queen Elizabeth’s time, should have coined a similar word, splendidious, as well as the word splend’rous:—

Celestial brightness seized on his face,
That did the wond’ring Israelites amaze,
When he returned from that sovereign place,
His brows encircled with splendidious rays.

Moses, his Birth and Miracles, B. iii.

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