glossa vs lingua what difference

what is difference between glossa and lingua

English

Etymology

From the Ancient Greek γλῶσσᾰ (glôssa, tongue).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡlɒsə/
  • Rhymes: -ɒsə

Noun

glossa (plural glossae)

  1. (zoology) The tongue, or lingua, of an insect.

Related terms

  • paraglossa

Translations


Italian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin glossa. Doublet of chiosa.

Noun

glossa f (plural glosse)

  1. gloss (explanatory note)
Related terms
  • glossare

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

glossa

  1. inflection of glossare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

  • glasso, glassò

Italiot Greek

Etymology

From Ancient Greek γλῶσσα (glôssa).

Noun

glossa f

  1. tongue

Latin

Alternative forms

  • glōsa
  • gloss. (abbreviation)

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek γλῶσσᾰ (glôssa).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈɡloːs.sa/, [ˈɡɫ̪oːs̠ːä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈɡlos.sa/, [ˈɡlɔsːɑ]

Noun

glōssa f (genitive glōssae); first declension

  1. an obsolete, foreign, rare, or otherwise obscure or difficult term that requires explanation
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Ausonius to this entry?)
    • circa AD 95, Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (author), Harold Edgeworth Butler (editor, translator), Institutio Oratoria (1920), book I, chapter i, § 35:
      protinus enim potest interpretationem linguae secretioris, quas Graeci γλώσσας vocant, dum aliud agitur, ediscere et inter prima elementa consequi rem postea proprium tempus desideraturam. et quoniam circa res adhuc tenues moramur, ii quoque versus, qui ad imitationem scribendi proponentur, non otiosas velim sententias habeant sed honestum aliquid monentes.

      He can readily learn the explanations or glosses, as the Greeks call them, of the more obscure words by the way and, while he is still engaged on the first rudiments, acquire what would otherwise demand special time to be devoted to it. And as we are still discussing minor details, I would urge that the lines, which he is set to copy, should not express thoughts of no significance, but convey some sound moral lesson. ― translation from the same source
    Synonym: glossēma
    1. (Late Latin) an explanation or interpretation of such a word
      • (Can we find and add a quotation of Isidore of Seville to this entry?)
      Synonym: interpretātiō
    2. (Medieval Latin) an explanation added to a passage of text, a gloss
  2. (in the plural, as glossae) a term applied to collections of such words with explanations, a glossary
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Marcus Terentius Varro to this entry?)
    Synonyms: glossārium, glossātūra, glossēmata
    1. (Medieval Latin) a series of glosses assembled into a commentary
  3. (Medieval Latin) a language, dialect, or peculiar idiom
    Synonyms: idiōma, lingua
  4. (Medieval Latin) an image or example (of a thing)
    Synonyms: exemplum, imāgō

Usage notes

  • This word is written in untransliterated Greek in some Classical sources.

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Old French: glose
    • Middle French: glose
      • French: glose
    • Czech: glosa
  • Italian: chiosa
  • Catalan: glossa
  • Middle English: glosse
    • English: gloss
  • Old Irish: glúas
    • Middle Irish: glúais
      • Irish: gluais
  • Italian: glossa
  • Polish: glosa
  • Portuguese: glosa
  • Spanish: glosa

References

  • glossa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • 1. GLOSSA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • 2. GLOSSA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • glossa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 716/2
  • glossa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • glossa” on page 767/3 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “glossa”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 470/2


English

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from Latin lingua (the tongue). Doublet of langue.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɪŋ.ɡwə/

Noun

lingua (plural linguae or linguas)

  1. (anatomy) Synonym of tongue.
  2. (entomology) A median process of the labium, at the underside of the mouth in insects, and serving as a tongue.

Related terms

  • lingua franca

References

  • “lingua”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Gaulin, nilgau

Galician

Etymology

From Latin lingua.

Noun

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. language

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese língua. Cognate with Kabuverdianu lingua.

Noun

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

Interlingua

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliŋ.ɡwa/

Noun

lingua (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. language

Synonyms

  • (language): linguage

Related terms

  • linguage
  • linguista
  • linguistica

Italian

Etymology

From Latin lingua.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliŋ.ɡwa/
  • Hyphenation: lìn‧gua

Noun

lingua f (plural lingue)

  1. tongue
  2. language, tongue
  3. strip, tongue (of land)
  4. (in the plural) foreign languages
  5. the square horn of an anvil
  6. (especially in plural) a type of Italian flatbread

Related terms

Descendants

  • Greek: λίγκα (lígka)
  • Maltese: lingwa

Anagrams

  • Langiu, i lunga, langui, languì, nilgau

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese língua.

Noun

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

Ladino

Alternative forms

  • lengua

Etymology

From Latin lingua.

Noun

lingua f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling לינגוה‎, plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. (linguistics) language

Synonyms

  • lashon

Latin

Alternative forms

  • dingua (ante-classical)

Etymology

From older dingua (attested as a rare word in Gaius Marius Victorinus), from Proto-Italic *denɣwā, from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s. The change of d- to l- is variously explained by a borrowing from another Italic language with such a shift and/or by a folk-etymological association with the verb lingō (to lick). Cognates include German Zunge and English tongue.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈlin.ɡʷa/, [ˈlʲɪŋɡʷä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈlin.ɡwa/, [ˈliŋɡwɑ]

Noun

lingua f (genitive linguae); first declension

  1. (literally) the tongue
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. a tongue, utterance, language, speech
      1. the tongue or language of a people
        1. (post-Classical) a dialect, idiom or mode of speech
      2. (poetic, of animals) a voice, note, song, bark, etc.
      3. an utterance, expression
    2. tongue-shaped things:
      1. Ranunculus lingua (a flowering plant)
        Synonym: lingulāca
      2. the oxtongue, bugloss
      3. the houndstongue
        Synonym: cynoglōssos
      4. a tongue of land
      5. a spoonful
        Synonym: lingula
      6. (music) the tongue or reed of a Roman tibiae
      7. (classical mechanics) the short arm of a lever

Inflection

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • Vulgar Latin *linguāticum

Descendants

References

  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lingua in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • lingua in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin lingua (tongue, speech, language).

Noun

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) language

Synonyms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) linguatg
  • (Puter, Vallader, poetic) linguach
  • (poetic) favella

Sicilian

Etymology

From Latin lingua (tongue, language).

Noun

lingua f (plural lingui)

  1. tongue
  2. language

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