glow vs radiate what difference

what is difference between glow and radiate

English

Etymology

From Middle English glowen, from Old English glōwan, from Proto-Germanic *glōaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel-. Cognate with Saterland Frisian gloie, glöie, gluuje, West Frisian gloeie, Dutch gloeien, German glühen, Danish and Norwegian glo, Icelandic glóa. See also glass.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Verb

glow (third-person singular simple present glows, present participle glowing, simple past glowed or (nonstandard) glew, past participle glowed or (nonstandard) glown)

  1. To give off light from heat or to emit light as if heated.
  2. To radiate some emotional quality like light.
  3. To gaze especially passionately at something.
  4. (copulative) To radiate thermal heat.
  5. To shine brightly and steadily.
  6. (transitive) To make hot; to flush.
  7. (intransitive) To feel hot; to have a burning sensation, as of the skin, from friction, exercise, etc.; to burn.
    • Did not his temples glow / In the same sultry winds and scorching heats?
    • 1727, John Gay, Sweet William’s Farewell to Black-eyed Susan
      The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands.
  8. (Internet slang, politics, far-right) to expose someone to the authorities.
  9. (Internet slang, politics, far-right) to create a threatening online post that may involve violence, and look suspicious enough to attract a police investigation.

Derived terms

  • glew
  • outglow

Related terms

  • gleed
  • glowie (an informant, a spy)

Translations

Noun

glow (countable and uncountable, plural glows)

  1. The light given off by a glowing object.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      Thus all that Art and Con had to do, when the night was favourable, was to advance a little way along the avenue, until they reached the place whence the light, if it was burning, must be visible, as a glow, a feeble glow, in the air, and thence to go on, towards the back door, or to go back, towards the gate, as the case might be.
  2. The condition of being passionate or having warm feelings.
  3. The brilliance or warmth of color in an environment or on a person (especially one’s face).
    He had a bright red glow on his face.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • gowl, w.l.o.g., wlog

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English glīwian.

Verb

glow

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to play music, have fun).

Etymology 2

From Old French gluer.

Verb

glow

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to glue).


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin radiatus, past participle of radiare (to radiate, furnish with spokes, give out rays, radiate, shine), from radius (a spoke, ray).

Pronunciation

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪdieɪt/
  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪdieɪt/, /ˈɹeɪdi.ət/

Verb

radiate (third-person singular simple present radiates, present participle radiating, simple past and past participle radiated)

  1. To extend, send or spread out from a center like radii.
    • 1994, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Parliamentary Debates
      Oban is not a terminus; its routes radiate by sea, rail and road.
  2. (transitive) To emit rays or waves.
    The stove radiates heat.
  3. (intransitive) To come out or proceed in rays or waves.
    The heat radiates from a stove.
    • 1706, John Locke, Elements of Natural Philosophy
      Light radiates from luminous bodies directly to our eyes.
  4. (transitive) To illuminate.
  5. To expose to ionizing radiation, such as by radiography.
  6. (transitive) To manifest oneself in a glowing manner.
  7. (ecology, intransitive) to spread into new habitats, migrate.

Synonyms

  • (to expose to radiation): irradiate

Derived terms

  • radiator

Related terms

  • radiation

Translations

Adjective

radiate (comparative more radiate, superlative most radiate)

  1. Radiating from a center; having rays or parts diverging from a center; radiated.
    a radiate crystal
  2. Surrounded by rays, such as the head of a saint in a religious picture.
  3. (botany) Having parts radiating from the center, like the petals in many flowers.
  4. (botany) Consisting of a disc in which the florets are tubular.
  5. (biology) Having radial symmetry, like a seastar.
  6. (zoology) Belonging to the Radiata.

Translations

Noun

radiate (plural radiates)

  1. (zoology) One of the Radiata.

Related terms

  • radial
  • radiation
  • radio
  • radius
  • ray

Further reading

  • radiate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • radiate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • radiate at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • airdate, ardaite, idea art, tiaraed

Esperanto

Adverb

radiate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of radii

Italian

Verb

radiate

  1. second-person plural present subjunctive of radere
  2. inflection of radiare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person plural imperative
  3. feminine plural of radiato

Anagrams

  • aderita, adirate, ardiate, datarie, daterai

Latin

Verb

radiāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of radiō

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