glower vs lour what difference

what is difference between glower and lour

English

Etymology 1

From an alteration (possibly Scots) of glore, from Middle English glōren, glouren (to gleam; to glare, glower); or from glow (to stare) (obsolete), and ultimately from a Scandinavian (North Germanic) language. Cognate with Low German gloren (to flicker; to glimmer), Middle Dutch gloren, Icelandic glóra. See more at glare.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡlaʊə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ.ə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: glow‧er

Verb

glower (third-person singular simple present glowers, present participle glowering, simple past and past participle glowered)

  1. (intransitive) To look or stare with anger. [from late 15th c.]
Synonyms
  • glare
  • scowl
Translations

Noun

glower (plural glowers)

  1. An angry glare or stare. [from late 15th c.]
Alternative forms
  • glour
  • glowr (obsolete)
Synonyms
  • glare
  • scowl
Derived terms
  • glowerer
  • glowering (noun)
  • gloweringly
Translations
See also
  • frown

Etymology 2

From Middle English glouere, equivalent to glow +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡləʊə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡloʊə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -əʊə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: glow‧er

Noun

glower (plural glowers)

  1. That which glows or emits light.

References

Further reading

  • Nernst glower on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Gowler, reglow


English

Etymology

The verb is derived from Middle English louren, lour, loure (to frown or scowl; to be dark or overcast; to droop, fade, wither; to lurk, skulk), probably from Old English *lūran, *lūrian, from Proto-Germanic *lūraną (to lie in wait, lurk). The English word is cognate with Danish lure (to lie in ambush; to take a nap), Middle Dutch loeren (modern Dutch loeren (to lurk, spy on)), Middle Low German lūren (to lie in ambush), German Low German luren (to lurk), Middle High German lūren (to lie in ambush) (modern German lauern (to lie in ambush; to lurk)), Icelandic lúra (to take a nap), Saterland Frisian luurje (to lie in wait), West Frisian loere (to lurk), and Swedish lura (to lie in ambush; to deceive, fool, trick; to lure; to take a nap); and is related to lurk.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /laʊə/, /ˈlaʊ.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /laʊɚ/, /laʊɹ/, /ˈlaʊ.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊə(ɹ), -aʊ.ə(ɹ)

Verb

lour (third-person singular simple present lours, present participle louring, simple past and past participle loured)

  1. (intransitive) To frown; to look sullen.
    Synonyms: glower, scowl
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; of the sky: to be covered with dark and threatening clouds; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest.

Alternative forms

  • lower

Derived terms

  • louring, lowering (noun)
  • louringly, loweringly

Translations

Noun

lour (plural lours)

  1. A frown, a scowl; an angry or sullen look.
  2. (figuratively) Of the sky, the weather, etc.: a dark, gloomy, and threatening appearance.
    Synonyms: gloom, gloominess

Translations

References


Old French

Alternative forms

  • lur

Pronoun

lour m or f

  1. their (third-person plural possessive pronoun)

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • loor

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *lawaros (compare Welsh llawer (a lot), from Proto-Indo-European *leh₂w- (benefit, prize); compare Ancient Greek λᾱρός (lārós, tasty).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈl͈o.ur/

Adjective

lour

  1. enough, sufficient
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 159a3

Usage notes

Always predicative (and therefore uninflected) in Old Irish, but the Middle Irish descendant lór is used attributively.

Derived terms

  • lourtu

Descendants

  • Middle Irish: lór
    • Irish: leor
    • Manx: liooar
    • Scottish Gaelic: leòr

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “lór”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*ufo-lawto-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 397–98

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