glutton vs gourmand what difference

what is difference between glutton and gourmand

English

Etymology

From Old French gloton, gluton, from Latin gluto, glutonis. Application of the term to the wolverine was due to the belief that the animal was inordinately voracious, and to the German designation of it as the Vielfraß, which was analyzed as viel (much) + fressen (eat) although it actually derives from Old Norse.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡlʌt(ə)n/
  • Hyphenation: glut‧ton
  • Rhymes: -ʌtən

Adjective

glutton (comparative more glutton, superlative most glutton)

  1. Gluttonous; greedy; gormandizing.
    • A glutton monastery in former ages makes a hungry ministry in our days.

Noun

glutton (plural gluttons)

  1. One who eats voraciously, obsessively, or to excess; a gormandizer.
  2. (figuratively) One who consumes voraciously, obsessively, or to excess
  3. (now rare) The wolverine, Gulo gulo.
    • 1791, Joseph Priestley, Letters to Burke, VII:
      [A] civil establishment [] is the animal called a glutton, which falling from a tree (in which it generally conceals itself) upon some noble animal, immediately begins to tear it, and suck its blood [] .

Synonyms

  • (voracious eater): see Thesaurus:glutton

Translations

See also

  • glutton for punishment

Verb

glutton (third-person singular simple present gluttons, present participle gluttoning, simple past and past participle gluttoned)

  1. (archaic) To glut; to satisfy (especially an appetite) by filling to capacity.
    • a. 1657, Richard Lovelace, On Sanazar’s Hundred Duckets by hte Clarissimi of Venice
      Glutton’d at last, return at home to pine.
    • 1915, Journeyman Barber, Hairdresser, Cosmetologist and Proprietor:
      In some cities their [local branches] have become gluttoned with success, and in their misguided overzealous ambition they are ‘killing the goose that lays the golden egg.’
  2. (obsolete) To glut; to eat voraciously.
    • 1604, Michael Drayton, Moses in a Map of his Miracles
      Whereon in Egypt gluttoning they fed.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 75
      Thus do I pine and surfeit day by day, / Or gluttoning on all, or all away.

Related terms

References



English

Alternative forms

  • gormand

Etymology

From Middle English gourmaunt, gormond, gromonde, from Old French gormant (a glutton, noun), from gormant (gluttonous, adjective), of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡʊə.mənd/, /ˈɡʊʁmɑ̃/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɔɹˈmɑnd/, /ˈɡʊɹ.mɑnd/

Noun

gourmand (plural gourmands)

  1. A person given to excess in the consumption of food and drink; a greedy or ravenous eater.
  2. A person who appreciates good food.

Synonyms

  • (person given to excess consumption): glutton, trencherman, see also Thesaurus:glutton
  • (person who appreciates food): chowhound, gastronaut, gourmet
  • (person with a special interest or knowledge of food): foodie

Derived terms

  • gourmandise
  • gourmandism

Translations

See also

  • gourmet

French

Etymology

From Middle French gourmant (glutton), originally an adjectival form, from Old French, where it had the sense of trencherman, but of uncertain ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuʁ.mɑ̃/
  • Homophone: gourmands
  • Hyphenation: gour‧mand

Adjective

gourmand (feminine singular gourmande, masculine plural gourmands, feminine plural gourmandes)

  1. eating a lot
  2. (more recently) having a love for good food, demanding of food quality

Noun

gourmand m (plural gourmands, feminine gourmande)

  1. a person who eats a lot, or who has refined tastes in food

Usage notes

The French and English usages of this word are false friends. While the English word has evolved to emphasize the excesses of a gourmand, the French word has become more associated with refined tastes in food. See also gourmet, which has considerable overlap with this word.

Descendants

  • Czech: gurmán
  • Portuguese: gourmand
  • Romanian: gurmand

Further reading

  • “gourmand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French, where it had the sense of trencherman, but of uncertain ultimate origin

Adjective

gourmand m

  1. (Jersey) greedy

Portuguese

Etymology

From French gourmand.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ɡuʁˈmɐ̃/

Noun

gourmand m, f (plural gourmands)

  1. gourmand (person who appreciates good food)
  2. gourmand (person who eats too much)
    Synonym: comilão

Further reading

  • “gourmand” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

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