gob vs mariner what difference

what is difference between gob and mariner

English

Etymology

From Middle English gobben, gabben (to drink greedily), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a variant of Middle English globben (to gulp down), related to Middle English gulpen (to gulp); or alternatively related to French gober (swallow, gulp), from Irish and/or Scottish Gaelic gob (beak, bill), from Proto-Celtic *gobbos. See also gobbet.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɒb/
  • (General American) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɑb/
  • Rhymes: -ɒb

Noun

gob (countable and uncountable, plural gobs)

  1. (countable) A lump of soft or sticky material.
    • 1952, The Glass Industry, Volume 33, Ashlee Publishing Company, page 309,
      These inventors have discovered that gobs may be fed at widely spaced times without allowing the glass to flow during the interval but instead flushes[sic] out the chilled glass which accumulates during the dwell.
  2. (countable, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, slang) The mouth.
    Synonyms: cakehole, face, mush, trap
  3. (uncountable, slang) Saliva or phlegm.
    Synonyms: saliva, spit, sputum
  4. (US, military, slang) A sailor.
    • 1944 November, Fitting the Gob to the Job, Popular Mechanics, page 18,
      For the first time in history, new warship crews are virtually “prefabricated” by modern methods of fitting the gob to the job.
    • 1948 June, Fred B. Barton, Mending Broken Gobs, The Rotarian, page 22,
      Taking a safe average of 2,000 rehabilitated young gobs a year, that′s a total of 100,000 years of salvaged manhood, a target worth shooting at.
  5. (uncountable, mining) Waste material in old mine workings, goaf.
    • 1930, Engineering and Mining Journal, Volume 130, page 330,
      This consisted in wheeling gob back to the most distant part of the stope and filling up the sets right up to the roof.
  6. (US, regional) A whoopee pie.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gob (third-person singular simple present gobs, present participle gobbing, simple past and past participle gobbed)

  1. To gather into a lump.
    • 1997 March, William G. Tapply, How to Catch a Trout on a Sandwich, Field & Stream, page 60,
      I liked to gob up two or three worms on a snelled hook, pinch three or four split shot onto the leader, and plunk it into the dark water.
  2. To spit, especially to spit phlegm.
  3. (mining, intransitive) To pack away waste material in order to support the walls of the mine.

Translations

Anagrams

  • BOG, bog

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth) (compare French gober (gulp down) and gobelet (goblet) from Gaulish) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth); compare jowl from Old English ċēafl; German Kiefer (jaw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔbˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /ɡʌbˠ/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular goib, nominative plural goba)

  1. beak, bill (of a bird etc.)
  2. tip, point, projection
  3. pointy nose
  4. nib
  5. (colloquial) mouth

Declension

Derived terms

  • gobadán
  • gob siosúir

Verb

gob (present analytic gobann, future analytic gobfaidh, verbal noun gobadh, past participle gobtha)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) peck (ar (at)) (as a bird etc.)
  2. (intransitive) project, stick out, up

Conjugation

Mutation

Further reading

  • “gob” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “gob” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gob” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kop/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular guib, plural guib or goban)

  1. bill, beak, nib, tip
  2. point
  3. mouth
  4. garrulity
  5. babble

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “gob” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Compiled by Malcolm MacLennan)

Slovene

Noun

gob

  1. genitive dual/plural of goba


English

Etymology

From Middle English mariner, marinere, borrowed from Anglo-Norman mariner, marinier, from Old French marinier, maronnier, from marin; perhaps corresponding to a post-Classical or Vulgar Latin marinarius (sailor), from marīnus (marine; relating to the sea). Eclipsed non-native Middle English marinel, marynell (mariner, sailor) borrowed from Old French marinel.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmæɹɪnə/
  • Rhymes: -æɹɪnə(ɹ)

Noun

mariner (plural mariners)

  1. A sailor.

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

From marí. Compare Spanish marinero, Portuguese marinheiro, French marinier, Italian marinaio. Cf. also Vulgar Latin marinarius.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /mə.ɾiˈne/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ma.ɾiˈneɾ/

Adjective

mariner (feminine marinera, masculine plural mariners, feminine plural marineres)

  1. marine, sea
  2. seaworthy

Noun

mariner m (plural mariners, feminine marinera)

  1. sailor, seaman

Related terms

  • mar
  • marí

Further reading

  • “mariner” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “mariner” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “mariner” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “mariner” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

Originally “to pickle in brine or seawater”, from marin (of the sea).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ma.ʁi.ne/

Verb

mariner

  1. to marinate

Conjugation

Further reading

  • “mariner” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ranimer

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

mariner m

  1. indefinite plural of marine

Verb

mariner

  1. imperative of marinere

Old French

Alternative forms

  • marinier

Etymology

marin +‎ -er.

Noun

mariner m (oblique plural mariners, nominative singular mariners, nominative plural mariner)

  1. seaman; sailor

Descendants

  • English: mariner
  • Middle French: marinier
    • French: marinier

References

  • mariner on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Swedish

Noun

mariner

  1. indefinite plural of marin

Anagrams

  • minerar

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