gob vs tar what difference

what is difference between gob and tar

English

Etymology

From Middle English gobben, gabben (to drink greedily), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a variant of Middle English globben (to gulp down), related to Middle English gulpen (to gulp); or alternatively related to French gober (swallow, gulp), from Irish and/or Scottish Gaelic gob (beak, bill), from Proto-Celtic *gobbos. See also gobbet.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɒb/
  • (General American) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɑb/
  • Rhymes: -ɒb

Noun

gob (countable and uncountable, plural gobs)

  1. (countable) A lump of soft or sticky material.
    • 1952, The Glass Industry, Volume 33, Ashlee Publishing Company, page 309,
      These inventors have discovered that gobs may be fed at widely spaced times without allowing the glass to flow during the interval but instead flushes[sic] out the chilled glass which accumulates during the dwell.
  2. (countable, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, slang) The mouth.
    Synonyms: cakehole, face, mush, trap
  3. (uncountable, slang) Saliva or phlegm.
    Synonyms: saliva, spit, sputum
  4. (US, military, slang) A sailor.
    • 1944 November, Fitting the Gob to the Job, Popular Mechanics, page 18,
      For the first time in history, new warship crews are virtually “prefabricated” by modern methods of fitting the gob to the job.
    • 1948 June, Fred B. Barton, Mending Broken Gobs, The Rotarian, page 22,
      Taking a safe average of 2,000 rehabilitated young gobs a year, that′s a total of 100,000 years of salvaged manhood, a target worth shooting at.
  5. (uncountable, mining) Waste material in old mine workings, goaf.
    • 1930, Engineering and Mining Journal, Volume 130, page 330,
      This consisted in wheeling gob back to the most distant part of the stope and filling up the sets right up to the roof.
  6. (US, regional) A whoopee pie.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gob (third-person singular simple present gobs, present participle gobbing, simple past and past participle gobbed)

  1. To gather into a lump.
    • 1997 March, William G. Tapply, How to Catch a Trout on a Sandwich, Field & Stream, page 60,
      I liked to gob up two or three worms on a snelled hook, pinch three or four split shot onto the leader, and plunk it into the dark water.
  2. To spit, especially to spit phlegm.
  3. (mining, intransitive) To pack away waste material in order to support the walls of the mine.

Translations

Anagrams

  • BOG, bog

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth) (compare French gober (gulp down) and gobelet (goblet) from Gaulish) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth); compare jowl from Old English ċēafl; German Kiefer (jaw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔbˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /ɡʌbˠ/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular goib, nominative plural goba)

  1. beak, bill (of a bird etc.)
  2. tip, point, projection
  3. pointy nose
  4. nib
  5. (colloquial) mouth

Declension

Derived terms

  • gobadán
  • gob siosúir

Verb

gob (present analytic gobann, future analytic gobfaidh, verbal noun gobadh, past participle gobtha)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) peck (ar (at)) (as a bird etc.)
  2. (intransitive) project, stick out, up

Conjugation

Mutation

Further reading

  • “gob” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “gob” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gob” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kop/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular guib, plural guib or goban)

  1. bill, beak, nib, tip
  2. point
  3. mouth
  4. garrulity
  5. babble

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “gob” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Compiled by Malcolm MacLennan)

Slovene

Noun

gob

  1. genitive dual/plural of goba


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɑː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɑɹ/, [tʰɑɻ], [tʰɑɹ]
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English ter, terr, tarr, from Old English teoru, from Proto-West Germanic *teru, from Proto-Germanic *terwą (compare Saterland Frisian Taar, West Frisian tarre, tar, Dutch teer, German Teer), from Proto-Indo-European *derwo- (compare Welsh derw (oaks), Lithuanian dervà (pinewood, resin), Russian де́рево (dérevo, tree), Bulgarian дърво́ (dǎrvó, tree)), from *dóru (tree). More at tree.

Noun

tar (countable and uncountable, plural tars)

  1. (usually uncountable) A black, oily, sticky, viscous substance, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons derived from organic materials such as wood, peat, or coal.
  2. Coal tar.
  3. (uncountable) A solid residual byproduct of tobacco smoke.
  4. (slang, dated) A sailor, because of the traditional tarpaulin clothes.
    Synonym: Jack Tar
    • 1915, W. McMann, Our Picture Show, Western Evening Herald:
      If there’s one man that I admire, that man’s a British tar.
    • August 10 1723, Jonathan Swift, “To Charles Mordaunt, Earl of Peterborough”[1]:
      Shines in all climates like a star; In senates bold, and fierce in war; A land commander, and a tar.
  5. (uncountable) Black tar, a form of heroin.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

tar (third-person singular simple present tars, present participle tarring, simple past and past participle tarred)

  1. (transitive) To coat with tar.
  2. (transitive) To besmirch.
    The allegations tarred his name, even though he was found innocent.
    • 1995, Paul Robinson, The Gate Contracts
      Dr. Sign: In fact, maybe you think I should get credit, but if I do, Dr. Frendall will be scorned. You know why
      Dr. Ellsworth: Yes, I know. Your critics will tar him with the same brush as you.
Derived terms
  • tar and feather
  • tar with the same brush
Translations

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of tape archive.

Noun

tar (plural tars)

  1. (computing) A program for archiving files, common on Unix systems.
  2. (computing) A file produced by such a program.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

tar (third-person singular simple present tars, present participle tarring, simple past and past participle tarred)

  1. (computing, transitive) To create a tar archive.
Antonyms
  • untar
Derived terms
  • untar

Etymology 3

From Persian تار(târ).

Alternative forms

  • tār

Noun

tar (plural tars)

  1. A Persian long-necked, waisted instrument, shared by many cultures and countries in the Middle East and the Caucasus.
Translations
See also
  • Appendix:Glossary of chordophones

Etymology 4

From Arabic طار(ṭār).

Noun

tar (plural tars)

  1. A single-headed round frame drum originating in North Africa and the Middle East.
See also
  • Appendix:Glossary of membranophones
References
  • 2001. Drum Circle: A Guide to World Percussion. Chalo Eduardo, Frank Kumor. Pg. 18.

Anagrams

  • ‘art, ‘rat, ART, ATR, Art, RAT, RTA, Rat, art, art., rat, tra

Aromanian

Noun

tar m (plural tari)

  1. donkey

Synonyms

  • gumar/yumar, shonj/shonjiu, cãci, tãronj/tãroanji, uci, uricljat, dãnglãrã, dãngã

Derived terms

  • tãronj

Asturian

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin stāre, present active infinitive of stō. Compare Spanish estar, Aragonese estar, Galician estar, Portuguese estar, Catalan estar.

Verb

tar

  1. to be (referring to geographical place)
  2. to be (referring to something temporary)
  3. to be (for use in constructing continuous verb forms)

Conjugation

  • Reference: http://www.academiadelallingua.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Gramatica_Llingua.pdf

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Persian تار(târ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tɑr]

Noun

tar (definite accusative tarı, plural tarlar)

  1. tar

Declension


Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowing from an Oghur language, before the times of the Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin (at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries), from Proto-Turkic *tāŕ (bald). Cognates include Turkish dazlak (bald), Karakhanid تازْ(tāz, bald), and Middle Mongolian [script needed] (tarasun, bald), the latter perhaps a Turkic borrowing too.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒr]
  • Rhymes: -ɒr

Adjective

tar (not comparable)

  1. bald
    Synonym: kopasz

Declension

Derived terms

  • tarol

References

Further reading

  • tar in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tar/
  • Hyphenation: tar

Noun

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. Alternative spelling of tir (chess pieces).

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tar/
  • Hyphenation: tar

Noun

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. (onomatopoeic) whipping sound.

Etymology 3

From Dutch taart, from Middle Dutch tāerte, from Old French tarte.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tar/
  • Hyphenation: tar

Noun

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. (cooking) a type of cake.
    Synonym: kue tar

Etymology 4

From English tar, from Proto-Germanic *terwą, from Proto-Indo-European *derwo-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tar/
  • Hyphenation: tar

Noun

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. tar, the solid residual byproduct of tobacco smoke.

Usage notes

Other definition of tar translated into ter or tir.

Further reading

  • “tar” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish do·icc. The imperative is from a related verb, do·airicc.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /t̪ˠaɾˠ/

Verb

tar (present analytic tagann, future analytic tiocfaidh, verbal noun teacht, past participle tagtha)

  1. to come
  2. to survive

Conjugation

Forms based on the stem tig- (e.g. tigim and tig/tigeann) are found in Ulster and parts of Munster; forms based on the stem teag- (e.g. teagaim and teagann) are found in parts of Connacht.

The present analytic tig is particularly common in tar le (be able).

The obsolete present subjunctive is now found only in the preposition go dtí (to, toward, up to, until).

Alternative forms of the second-person singular imperative include tair in Munster, teara in Connemara, and gabh in Ulster.

Derived terms

Mutation


Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic طَارَ(ṭāra, to fly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːr/
  • Rhymes: -aːr

Verb

tar (imperfect jtir)

  1. to fly

Conjugation

Related terms

  • tajjar
  • tajran
  • mitjar

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish do·icc.

Verb

tar (verbal noun çheet, simple past haink, future hig, conditional harragh)

  1. to come

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • tar er-ash (return)

Middle English

Determiner

tar

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of þeir

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

Verb

tar

  1. present of ta

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

tar

  1. present of ta

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • dar

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *terh₂-. Cognate with Welsh tra and Latin trāns and Breton treuz.

Preposition

tar (with accusative)

  1. over, across

Inflection

Forms combined with the definite article:

  • tarsin (masculine/feminine singular)
  • tarsa (neuter singular)
  • tarsna (plural all genders)

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

  • tarm(u), darm (first person singular)
  • t(a)ra, dara (third person)

Forms combined with a possessive pronoun:

  • tar(s)a·, dara·

Derived terms

  • tar cenn

Descendants

  • Irish: thar
  • Manx: har, harrish
  • Scottish Gaelic: thar

Further reading

  • Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003)D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, §§ 434, 854
  • Pedersen, Holger (1913) Vergleichende Grammatik der keltischen Sprachen (in German), volume II, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, →ISBN, page 150

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tar/

Noun

tar f

  1. genitive plural of tara

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • (Brazil)

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈtaɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈta/

Verb

tar

  1. (Portugal) Nonstandard spelling of estar.
    • 1983, Manuel da Costa Fontes, Romanceiro da Ilha de São Jorge, Universidade de Coimbra, page 236:

Romanian

Etymology

From Hungarian tár

Noun

tar m (plural taruri)

  1. unit of measurement for weights

Declension


Sumerian

Romanization

tar

  1. Romanization of ???? (tar)

Swedish

Verb

tar

  1. present tense of ta.

Anagrams

  • art

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