gob vs trap what difference

what is difference between gob and trap

English

Etymology

From Middle English gobben, gabben (to drink greedily), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a variant of Middle English globben (to gulp down), related to Middle English gulpen (to gulp); or alternatively related to French gober (swallow, gulp), from Irish and/or Scottish Gaelic gob (beak, bill), from Proto-Celtic *gobbos. See also gobbet.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɒb/
  • (General American) enPR: gŏb, IPA(key): /ɡɑb/
  • Rhymes: -ɒb

Noun

gob (countable and uncountable, plural gobs)

  1. (countable) A lump of soft or sticky material.
    • 1952, The Glass Industry, Volume 33, Ashlee Publishing Company, page 309,
      These inventors have discovered that gobs may be fed at widely spaced times without allowing the glass to flow during the interval but instead flushes[sic] out the chilled glass which accumulates during the dwell.
  2. (countable, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, slang) The mouth.
    Synonyms: cakehole, face, mush, trap
  3. (uncountable, slang) Saliva or phlegm.
    Synonyms: saliva, spit, sputum
  4. (US, military, slang) A sailor.
    • 1944 November, Fitting the Gob to the Job, Popular Mechanics, page 18,
      For the first time in history, new warship crews are virtually “prefabricated” by modern methods of fitting the gob to the job.
    • 1948 June, Fred B. Barton, Mending Broken Gobs, The Rotarian, page 22,
      Taking a safe average of 2,000 rehabilitated young gobs a year, that′s a total of 100,000 years of salvaged manhood, a target worth shooting at.
  5. (uncountable, mining) Waste material in old mine workings, goaf.
    • 1930, Engineering and Mining Journal, Volume 130, page 330,
      This consisted in wheeling gob back to the most distant part of the stope and filling up the sets right up to the roof.
  6. (US, regional) A whoopee pie.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gob (third-person singular simple present gobs, present participle gobbing, simple past and past participle gobbed)

  1. To gather into a lump.
    • 1997 March, William G. Tapply, How to Catch a Trout on a Sandwich, Field & Stream, page 60,
      I liked to gob up two or three worms on a snelled hook, pinch three or four split shot onto the leader, and plunk it into the dark water.
  2. To spit, especially to spit phlegm.
  3. (mining, intransitive) To pack away waste material in order to support the walls of the mine.

Translations

Anagrams

  • BOG, bog

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth) (compare French gober (gulp down) and gobelet (goblet) from Gaulish) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth); compare jowl from Old English ċēafl; German Kiefer (jaw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔbˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /ɡʌbˠ/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular goib, nominative plural goba)

  1. beak, bill (of a bird etc.)
  2. tip, point, projection
  3. pointy nose
  4. nib
  5. (colloquial) mouth

Declension

Derived terms

  • gobadán
  • gob siosúir

Verb

gob (present analytic gobann, future analytic gobfaidh, verbal noun gobadh, past participle gobtha)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) peck (ar (at)) (as a bird etc.)
  2. (intransitive) project, stick out, up

Conjugation

Mutation

Further reading

  • “gob” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “gob” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gob” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbos (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kop/

Noun

gob m (genitive singular guib, plural guib or goban)

  1. bill, beak, nib, tip
  2. point
  3. mouth
  4. garrulity
  5. babble

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “gob” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gop”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Compiled by Malcolm MacLennan)

Slovene

Noun

gob

  1. genitive dual/plural of goba


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trăp, IPA(key): /tɹæp/, [tɹ̥æp], [tʃɹ̥æp]
  • (Northern English) IPA(key): [t̠ɹ̝̊äp]
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English trappe, from Old English træppe, treppe (trap, snare) (also in betræppan (to trap)) from Proto-Germanic *trap-, from Proto-Indo-European *dremb- (to run).

Akin to Old High German trappa, trapa (trap, snare), Middle Dutch trappe (trap, snare), Middle Low German treppe (step, stair) (German Treppe “step, stair”), Old English treppan (to step, tread) and possibly Albanian trap (raft, channel, path). Connection to “step” is “that upon which one steps”. French trappe and Spanish trampa are ultimately borrowings from Germanic.

Noun

trap (countable and uncountable, plural traps)

  1. A machine or other device designed to catch (and sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.
    Synonym: snare
  2. A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense; a snare.
  3. A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.
  4. (now rare) A kind of movable stepladder or set of stairs.
    • 1798 January 3, Edinburgh Weekly Journal, page 5:
      There is likewise a cabin trap with five steps.
    • 1842, Ellison Jack (girl, age 11), quoted in The Condition and Treatment of the Children Employed in the Mines, page 48:
      “I have to bear my burthen up four traps, or ladders, before I get to the main road which leads to the pit bottom.”
    • 1847, David Low, Elements of Practical Agriculture, page 37
      They have very generally received the name of trap-rocks, because they often present the appearance of traps or stairs.
    • 1867, The Children’s hour, page 137:
      Little Alf turned at once, and bidding Frank good-bye, he went into the house, and climbed up the trap stair into his little room in the garret, and pondered in his heart these words of Dolly’s.
    • 1875, The Gardner: A Magazine of Horticulture and Floriculture, page 3:
      The labour and time that are saved by thus concentrating and placing the heating power in doing away with the running to so many points, and up and down so many stairs or traps in attending to a number of fires, is also well worth noticing.
    • 1887, George G. Green, Gordonhaven, page 114:
      Coming near the door, Scorgie cautioned quietness, and pointing to a trap stair he motioned Mr. Love and Donald to ascend to the loft.
    • 1889 (original 1886), Willock, Rosetty Ends, 29:
      Had climbed up the trap-stair, and was busy potterin’ aboot.
    • 1920, Soviet Russia, page 14:
      Tossing, the negro walks up the trap-ladder. But the emotions of a drunkard change quickly.
    • 1960, Bernard Guilbert Guerney, An Anthology of Russian Literature in the Soviet Period from Gorki to Pasternak
      The stokers, breaking into excited talk, picked him up and dragged him up the trap ladder to the deck. The Canadian wiped the blood off Petka’s injured forehead …
  5. A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball.
  6. The game of trapball itself.
  7. Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.
  8. A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.
  9. A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for lack of an outlet.
  10. (aviation, military, slang) A successful landing on an aircraft carrier using the carrier’s arresting gear.
  11. (historical) A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      The two women looked down the alley. At the end of the Bottoms a man stood in a sort of old-fashioned trap, bending over bundles of cream-coloured stuff; while a cluster of women held up their arms to him, some with bundles.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 51
      I had told them they could have my trap to take them as far as the road went, because after that they had a long walk.
    • At the last moment Mollie, the foolish, pretty white mare who drew Mr. Jones’s trap, came mincing daintily in, chewing at a lump of sugar.
  12. (slang) A person’s mouth.
  13. (in the plural) Belongings.
    • 1870, Mark Twain, Running for Governor,
      …his cabin-mates in Montana losing small valuables from time to time, until at last, these things having been invariably found on Mr. Twain’s person or in his “trunk” (newspaper he rolled his traps in)…
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter IX, p. 144, [1]
      “Carry your traps out, Ma?” asked one of the passengers.
  14. (slang) A cubicle (in a public toilet).
  15. (sports) Trapshooting.
  16. (geology) A geological structure that creates a petroleum reservoir.
  17. (computing) An exception generated by the processor or by an external event.
  18. (Australia, slang, historical) A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.
    • 1996, Judith Kapferer, Being All Equal: Identity, Difference and Australian Cultural Practice, page 84,
      The miners′ grievances centred on the issue of the compulsory purchase of miners′ licences and the harassment of raids by the licensing police, the ‘traps,’ in search of unlicensed miners.
    • 2006, Helen Calvert, Jenny Herbst, Ross Smith, Australia and the World: Thinking Historically, page 55,
      Diggers were angered by frequent licence inspections and harassment by ‘the traps’ (the goldfield police).
  19. (US, slang, African-American Vernacular, also attributive) A vehicle, residential building, or sidewalk corner where drugs are manufactured, packaged, or sold.
  20. (slang, informal, sometimes considered offensive) A fictional character from anime, or related media, who is coded as or has qualities typically associated with a gender other than the character’s ostensible gender; otokonoko.
    • 2013, One Piece: Grand Line 3 Point 5, page 47:
      One way to spot a trap is to look for an adam’s apple.
  21. (music, uncountable) A genre of hip-hop music, with half-time drums and heavy sub-bass.
    Synonym: trap music
  22. (slang, uncountable) The money earned by a prostitute for a pimp.
    • 2010, C. J. Land, A Hustler’s Tale, page 54:
      The money clip held thirty-nine hundred dollars, combined with her trap money, she had five thousand dollars for her man.
    • 2011, Shaheem Hargrove, Sharice Cuthrell, The Rise and Fall of a Ghetto Celebrity, page 55:
      The code was to call a pimp and tell him you have his hoe plus turn over her night trap but that was bull because the HOE was out of his stable months before I copped her.
    • 2012 (original 1981), Alix Kates Shulman, On the Stroll: A Novel, Open Road Media (→ISBN):
      For the first time in the week since she’d been hooking she hadn’t made her trap.
Antonyms

(aircraft-carrier landing): bolter

Derived terms
Translations

Verb

trap (third-person singular simple present traps, present participle trapping, simple past and past participle trapped)

  1. (transitive) To physically capture, to catch in a trap or traps, or something like a trap.
  2. (transitive) To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
  3. (transitive) To provide with a trap.
  4. (intransitive) To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game.
  5. (aviation, military, slang, intransitive) To successfully land an aircraft on an aircraft carrier using the carrier’s arresting gear.
  6. (intransitive) To leave suddenly, to flee.
  7. (US, slang, informal, African-American Vernacular, intransitive) To sell illegal drugs, especially in a public area.
  8. (computing, intransitive) To capture (e.g. an error) in order to handle or process it.
  9. (mining, dated) To attend to and open and close a (trap-)door.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:trap.
Antonyms

(land on an aircraft carrier):

  • bolter
Derived terms
  • betrap
Translations

Related terms

  • entrap
  • entrapment

References

  • 1895, William Dwight Whitney, The Century Dictionary, page 6441, “trap”: “A kind of movable ladder or steps: a ladder leading up to a loft.”

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Swedish trapp (step, stair, stairway), from Middle Low German trappe (stair, step).

Noun

trap (countable and uncountable, plural traps)

  1. A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.
Derived terms
  • trappean
  • trappous
  • trappy

Etymology 3

Akin to Middle English trappe (trappings, gear), and perhaps from Old Northern French trape, a byform of Old French drap, a word of the same origin as English drab (a kind of cloth).

Verb

trap (third-person singular simple present traps, present participle trapping, simple past and past participle trapped)

  1. To dress with ornaments; to adorn (especially said of horses).
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Godiva
      There she found her palfrey trapt / In purple blazon’d with armorial gold.
Related terms
  • trapping

Etymology 4

Shortening.

Noun

trap (plural traps)

  1. (slang, bodybuilding) The trapezius muscle.

Anagrams

  • part, part., patr-, prat, rapt, rtPA, tarp

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch trap, from Middle Dutch trappe, from Old Dutch *trappa, from Proto-Germanic *trappō, *trappōn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trap/

Noun

trap (plural trappe, diminutive trappie)

  1. stairs, staircase

Albanian

Etymology

Either a t- prefixed form of *rap, related to rrap (cf. Old Norse raptr (rafter), English raft), or akin to Proto-Germanic *trap-, compare Old High German trappa, trapa (trap, snare), German Treppe (step, stair), Old English treppan (to step, tread), English trap.

Noun

trap m

  1. raft, ferry
  2. thick grove
  3. furrow, channel, ditch
  4. path (on the mountains or in the woods)

Related terms

  • rrap

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtrap]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *torpъ.

Noun

trap m inan

  1. trot
    Synonyms: klus, poklus

Etymology 2

Noun

trap m inan

  1. trap shooting

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

trap

  1. second-person singular imperative of trápit

Further reading

  • trap in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • trap in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trɑp/
  • Hyphenation: trap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch trappe, from Old Dutch *trappa, from Proto-Germanic *trappō, *trappōn, from Proto-Indo-European *dremb- (to run).

Noun

trap m (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n or trappetje n)

  1. stairs, staircase
  2. ladder
  3. degree, grade
  4. kick (act of kicking)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: trap
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: trapu
  • Jersey Dutch: trāp
  • Negerhollands: trap
  • Indonesian: terap
  • Japanese: タラップ (tarappu)
  • Russian: трап (trap)

Verb

trap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trappen
  2. imperative of trappen

Etymology 2

From German Trappe, from Polish drop or Czech drop.

Noun

trap f (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n)

  1. bustard

Anagrams

  • prat

Finnish

Etymology

From English trap.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɑp/, [ˈt̪rɑp]
  • IPA(key): /ˈtræp/, [ˈt̪ræp]
  • Rhymes: -ɑp
  • Syllabification: trap

Noun

trap

  1. trapshooting, trap (type of shooting sport)
  2. (ice hockey) trap

Declension

Pronunciation /ˈt̪rɑp/:

Pronunciation /ˈt̪ræp/:

See also

  • trappi

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trap/

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

trap m inan

  1. (nautical) gangway, gangplank, gangboard, accommodation ladder
  2. trapdoor
    Synonym: zapadnia
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

trap

  1. second-person singular imperative of trapić

Further reading

  • trap in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trap in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English trap.

Noun

trap m, f (plural traps)

  1. trap (a transvestite or trans woman)

Noun

trap m (uncountable)

  1. trap (music)

Spanish

Etymology

From English trap.

Noun

trap m (uncountable)

  1. trap (music)

Derived terms

  • trapero

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial