goober vs peanut what difference

what is difference between goober and peanut

English

Alternative forms

  • gouber

Etymology

Via Gullah from Kongo nguba (peanut).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡuːbə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡubɚ/
  • Rhymes: -uːbə(ɹ)

Noun

goober (plural goobers)

  1. (chiefly Southern US) Synonym of peanut.
    • 1833 November 7, Louisville Public Advertiser:
      A few bags Gouber Pea, or Ground Pea
    • 1834 May 24, Cherokee Phoenix, p. 3:
      But he so seam I frade of he, I guess he steal my goober.
  2. (chiefly Southern US, dated slang) Synonym of Georgian or North Carolinian, particularly those from the pine forests of the Sandhills region.
    • 1863, Anonymous, “Castle Thunder” in Louis Napoléon Boudrye’s Historic Records of the Fifth New York Cavalry…, Appendix, p. 339:
      Conscripts by the dozen…
      Come pouring in the Castle…
      Some from Mississippi state and “Goobers” from Tar river.
    • 1871, Maximilian Schele de Vere, Americanisms, p. 57:
      The peanuts or earth-nuts known in North Carolina and the adjoining States as Goober peas, so that during the late Civil War a conscript from the so-called ‘piney woods’ of that State was apt to be nick-named a Goober.
  3. (chiefly US, childish slang) A foolish, simple, or amusingly silly person.
    • 2012 August 5, Nathan Rabin, “The Simpsons (Classic): ‘I Love Lisa'”, A.V. Club:
      For Ralph, any encouragement is too much. When Lisa gives Ralph a valentine bearing that locomotive pun that so affected The Simpsons’ showrunner, Ralph misinterprets the gesture as a genuine display of romantic interest rather than a gesture of pity from a thoughtful young geek to a friendless goober.

Synonyms

  • (fool): See Thesaurus:fool, Thesaurus:idiot, Thesaurus:ignoramus, and Thesaurus:mentally deficient person

Derived terms

  • goober-grabbler, goober pea

Verb

goober (third-person singular simple present goobers, present participle goobering, simple past and past participle goobered)

  1. (slang, intransitive) To drool or dribble.
  2. (slang, transitive) To drip or slather; to apply a gooey substance to a surface.

References

  • “goober”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  • “goober, n.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900.

Anagrams

  • bog ore, booger


English

Etymology

From pea +‎ nut, perhaps a folk etymology of pinda, pinder (still found in Southern US dialects).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: pē’nŭt”, IPA(key): /ˈpiːˌnʌt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpinət/, /ˈpiˌnʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Noun

peanut (plural peanuts)

  1. A legume resembling a nut, the fruit of the plant Arachis hypogaea.
  2. (US) A very small clam.
  3. See peanuts (very small amount).

Hypernyms

  • earthnut, groundnut

Synonyms

  • goober (Southern US slang), goober pea (dated Southern US), monkey nut (UK)

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • beer nut

Verb

peanut (third-person singular simple present peanuts, present participle peanutting, simple past and past participle peanutted)

  1. (transitive) To pull on somebody’s tie as a prank, causing the knot to tighten.

Further reading

  • Arachis hypogaea on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • peanut on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • peanut at USDA Plants database
  • peanut on Integrated Taxonomic Information System.

Anagrams

  • ante up, ante-up, untape

Danish

Etymology

From English peanut.

Noun

peanut c (singular definite peanutten, plural indefinite peanuts)

  1. peanut

Inflection

Synonyms

  • jordnød

Further reading

  • “peanut” in Den Danske Ordbog

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