good vs right what difference

what is difference between good and right

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: go͝od, IPA(key): /ɡʊd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡʊd/, [ɡʊ̈d], [ɡɪ̈d]
  • (AAVE) enPR: go͝o(d), IPA(key): /ɡʊ(d)/
  • Rhymes: -ʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English good, from Old English gōd, from Proto-West Germanic *gōd, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ- (to unite, be associated, suit). Cognate with Russian го́дный (gódnyj, fit, well-suited, good for; (coll.) good), год (god), “year”, via “suitable time”. Not related to the word god.

Alternative forms

  • g’d (poetic contraction)
  • goode (obsolete)

Adjective

good (comparative better, superlative best)

  1. (of people)
    1. Acting in the interest of what is beneficial, ethical, or moral.
      • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
        It is not good to be alone, to walk here in this worthly wone.
      • 1500?, Evil Tonguesː
        If any man would begin his sins to reny, or any good people that frae vice deed rest ain. What so ever he were that to virtue would apply, But an ill tongue will all overthrow again.
      • 1891, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ch.6
        When we are happy, we are always good, but when we are good, we are not always happy.
    2. Competent or talented.
      • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
        And Marsha says I am a good cook!

    3. Able to be depended on for the discharge of obligations incurred; of unimpaired credit; used with for.
    4. Well-behaved (especially of children or animals).
    5. (US) Satisfied or at ease
    6. (archaic) Of high rank or birth.
  2. (of capabilities)
    1. Useful for a particular purpose; functional.
      • 1526, Herballː
        Against cough and scarceness of breath caused of cold take the drink that it hath been sodden in with Liquorice[,] or that the powder hath been sodden in with dry figs[,] for the same the electuary called dyacalamentum is good[,] and it is made thus.
    2. Effective.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    3. (obsolete) Real; actual; serious.
      • Love no man in good earnest.
  3. (properties and qualities)
    1. (of food)
      1. Edible; not stale or rotten.
      2. Having a particularly pleasant taste.
        • c. 1430 (reprinted 1888), Thomas Austin, ed., Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55 [Early English Text Society, Original Series; 91], London: N. Trübner & Co. for the Early English Text Society, volume I, OCLC 374760, page 11:
          Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke [] caste þher-to Safroun an Salt []
        • 1962 (quoting 1381 text), Hans Kurath & Sherman M. Kuhn, eds., Middle English Dictionary, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, ISBN 978-0-472-01044-8, page 1242:
          dorrẹ̅, dōrī adj. & n. [] cook. glazed with a yellow substance; pome(s ~, sopes ~. [] 1381 Pegge Cook. Recipes page 114: For to make Soupys dorry. Nym onyons [] Nym wyn [] toste wyte bred and do yt in dischis, and god Almande mylk.
      3. Being satisfying; meeting dietary requirements.
    2. Healthful.
    3. Pleasant; enjoyable.
    4. Favourable.
    5. Unblemished; honourable.
    6. Beneficial; worthwhile.
    7. Adequate; sufficient; not fallacious.
      • My reasons are both good and weighty.
  4. (colloquial, when with and) Very, extremely. See good and.
  5. Holy (especially when capitalized) .
  6. (of quantities)
    1. Reasonable in amount.
    2. Large in amount or size.
      • The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [].
    3. Full; entire; at least as much as.
Usage notes

The comparative gooder and superlative goodest are nonstandard.
In informal (often jocular) contexts, best may be inflected further and given the comparative bester and the superlative bestest; these forms are also nonstandard.

Synonyms
  • (having positive attributes): not bad, all right, satisfactory, decent, see also Thesaurus:good
  • (healthful): well
  • (competent or talented): accomplished
  • (acting in the interest of good; ethical): See Thesaurus:goodness
Antonyms
  • (having positive attributes): bad, poor
  • (ethical): bad, evil
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

good

  1. That is good; an elliptical exclamation of satisfaction or commendation.
    Good! I can leave now.

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English goode (good, well, adverb), from the adjective. Compare Dutch goed (good, well, adverb), German gut (good, well, adverb), Danish godt (good, well, adverb), Swedish godt (good, well, adverb), all from the adjective.

Adverb

good (comparative better, superlative best)

  1. (nonstandard) Well; satisfactorily or thoroughly.
    The boy done good. (did well)
    • 2007 April 19, Jimmy Wales, “Jimmy Wales on the User-Generated Generation”, Fresh Air, WHYY, Pennsylvania [1]
      The one thing that we can’t dois throw out the baby with the bathwater. We know our process works pretty darn good and, uh, it’s really sparked this amazing phenomenon of thishigh-quality website.
Derived terms
  • but good
  • a good many

Etymology 3

From Middle English good, god, from Old English gōd (a good thing, advantage, benefit, gift; good, goodness, welfare; virtue, ability, doughtiness; goods, property, wealth), from Proto-Germanic *gōdą (goods, belongings), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ-, *gʰodʰ- (to unite, be associated, suit). Compare German Gut (item of merchandise; estate; property).

Noun

good (countable and uncountable, plural goods)

  1. (uncountable) The forces or behaviours that are the enemy of evil. Usually consists of helping others and general benevolence.
    Antonyms: bad, evil
  2. (countable) A result that is positive in the view of the speaker.
    Antonym: bad
  3. (uncountable) The abstract instantiation of goodness; that which possesses desirable qualities, promotes success, welfare, or happiness, is serviceable, fit, excellent, kind, benevolent, etc.
    He is an influence for good on those girls.
    • There be many that say, Who will show us any good? Lord lift thou up the light of thy countenance upon us.
    • 1788, John Jay, The Federalist Papers No. 64:
      [] the government must be a weak one indeed, if it should forget that the good of the whole can only be promoted by advancing the good of each of the parts or members which compose the whole.
  4. (countable, usually in the plural) An item of merchandise.
    • Thy lands and goods / Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate / Unto the state of Venice.
Derived terms
  • (item of merchandise): capital goods, consumer goods
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English goden, godien, from Old English gōdian (to improve, get better; make better; endow, enrich), from Proto-West Germanic *gōdōn (to make better, improve), from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz (good, favourable).

Verb

good (third-person singular simple present goods, present participle gooding, simple past and past participle gooded)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To thrive; fatten; prosper; improve.
  2. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To make good; turn to good; improve.
  3. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To make improvements or repairs.
  4. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To benefit; gain.
  5. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To do good to (someone); benefit; cause to improve or gain.
  6. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To satisfy; indulge; gratify.
  7. (reflexive, now chiefly dialectal) To flatter; congratulate oneself; anticipate.
Derived terms
  • gooding

Etymology 5

From English dialectal, from Middle English *goden, of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish göda (to fatten, fertilise, battle), Danish gøde (to fertilise, battle), ultimately from the adjective. See above.

Verb

good (third-person singular simple present goods, present participle gooding, simple past and past participle gooded)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal, Scotland) To furnish with dung; manure; fatten with manure; fertilise.
    • April 5 1628, Bishop Joseph Hall, The Blessings, Sins, and Judgments of God’s Vineyard
      Nature was like itself , in it , in the world : God hath taken it in from the barren downs , and gooded it : his choice did not find , but make it thus
Derived terms
  • goodening

Further reading

  • good at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • good in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • good in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Dutch Low Saxon

Adjective

good

  1. good

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch goet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʝoː˦d], [ʝoː˦t]

Adjective

good (comparative baeter, superlative bès, predicative superlative ‘t ‘t bès)

  1. good

Inflection


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • god, gode, goed, gude

Etymology

From Old English gōd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡoːd/
  • Rhymes: -oːd

Adjective

good (plural and weak singular goode, comparative bettre, superlative best)

  1. good (of good quality or behaviour)
  2. good (morally right or righteous)
    • 14th c., Chaucer, General Prologue:
  3. advantageous, wealthy, profitable, useful
  4. large; of a great size or quantity
  5. Having a great degree or extent.

Descendants

  • English: good
  • Scots: guid
  • Yola: gooude, gayde

References

  • “gọ̄d, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.


English

Alternative forms

  • ryght (obsolete)
  • reight (Yorkshire)
  • rite (informal)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: rīt, IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪt/
  • (General American) enPR: rīt, IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪt/, [ˈɹaɪʔ(t̚)]
  • (adverb: exactly; immediately):
    (dialectal, includes Western Canada, Northern England, Midlands) IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪt/, [ˈɹeɪʔt̚]
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: rite, wright, Wright, write, rate (dialectal; certain senses only)

Etymology 1

From Middle English right, riȝt, reȝt, from Old English riht, ryht, reht (right), from Proto-West Germanic *reht, from Proto-Germanic *rehtaz (right, direct), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵtós (having moved in a straight line), from *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, direct). An Indo-European past participle, it became a Germanic adjective which has been used also as a noun since the common Germanic period. Cognate with West Frisian rjocht, Dutch recht, German recht and Recht, Swedish rätt and rät, Danish ret, Norwegian Bokmål rett, Norwegian Nynorsk rett, and Icelandic rétt. The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek ὀρεκτός (orektós) and Latin rēctus; Albanian drejt was borrowed from Latin.

Adjective

right (comparative righter or more right, superlative rightest or rightmost)

  1. (archaic) Straight, not bent.
    a right line
  2. (geometry) Of an angle, having a size of 90 degrees, or one quarter of a complete rotation; the angle between two perpendicular lines.
    The kitchen counter formed a right angle with the back wall.
  3. (geometry) Of a geometric figure, incorporating a right angle between edges, faces, axes, etc.
    a right triangle, a right prism, a right cone
  4. Complying with justice, correctness or reason; correct, just, true.
    I thought you’d made a mistake, but it seems you were right all along.
    It’s not right that one person gets all the credit for the group’s work.
    • 1610, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding/Book II
      If there be no prospect beyond the grave, the inference is certainly right, “Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.”
    • 1808, Bishop Joseph Hall, Devotional works
      there are some dispositions blame-worthy in men, which are yet, in a right sense, holily ascribed unto God; as unchangeableness, and irrepentance.
    • 1841, Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge Chapter 13
      What do you send me into London for, giving me only the right to call for my dinner at the Black Lion, which you’re to pay for next time you go, as if I was not to be trusted with a few shillings? Why do you use me like this? It’s not right of you. You can’t expect me to be quiet under it.
    • January 4 2018, Catherine Ford in the Calgary Herald, Religious-based health care raises ethical questions
      But when that patient requests access to medical care that violates some religious tenet, is it right that he or she either be denied outright or forced to seek an alternative facility?
  5. Appropriate, perfectly suitable; fit for purpose.
    Is this the right software for my computer?
  6. Healthy, sane, competent.
    I’m afraid my father is no longer in his right mind.
  7. Real; veritable (used emphatically).
    You’ve made a right mess of the kitchen!
    • 2016, Sarah Harvey, A Laugh-out-loud Modern Love Story
      He’s got a wicked sense of fun, he can be a right laugh, he’s ever so broadminded – ooh, and he’s got a lovely broad chest too.
    • 1670, John Milton, The History of Britain
      [] in this battle and whole business the Britons never more plainly manifested themselves to be right barbarians: no rule, no foresight, no forecast, experience, or estimation
  8. (Australia) All right; not requiring assistance.
    • 1986 David Williamson, “What If You Died Tomorrow,” Collected plays, Volume 1, Currency Press, p310
      KIRSTY: I suppose you’re hungry. Would you like something to eat? / KEN: No. I’m right, thanks.
    • 2001 Catherine Menagé, Access to English, National Centre for English Language Teaching and Research, NSW: Sydney, p25
      When the sales assistant sees the customer, she asks Are you right, sir? This means Are you all right? She wants to know if he needs any help.
    • 2001 Morris Gleitzman, Two weeks with the Queen, Pan Macmillan Australia, p75
      ‘You lost?’ / Colin spun round. Looking at him was a nurse, her eyebrows raised. / ‘No, I’m right, thanks,’ said Colin.’
  9. (dated) Most favourable or convenient; fortunate.
    • c. 1707 Joseph Adsison, The Tatler
      The lady has been disappointed on the right side.
  10. Designating the side of the body which is positioned to the east if one is facing north. This arrow points to the reader’s right: →
    After the accident, her right leg was slightly shorter than her left.
  11. Designed to be placed or worn outward.
    the right side of a piece of cloth
  12. (politics) Pertaining to the political right; conservative.
Synonyms
  • (correctness): correct, just
  • (side, direction): dexter, dextral, right-hand
  • (politics): conservative, right-wing
  • (as a tag question): see Appendix:English tag questions
Antonyms
  • (straightness): bowed, crooked, curved
  • (correctness): wrong
  • (side, direction): left
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Descendants

  • Spanish: right
  • Welsh: reit

Etymology 2

From Middle English right, righte, from Old English rihte, rehte (right; rightly; due; directly; straight), from Proto-Germanic *rehta, from *rehtaz (right; straight).

Adverb

right (not comparable)

  1. On the right side.
  2. Towards the right side.
  3. Exactly, precisely.
  4. Immediately, directly.
  5. (Britain, US, dialect) Very, extremely, quite.
  6. According to fact or truth; actually; truly; really.
  7. In a correct manner.
  8. (dated, still used in some titles) To a great extent or degree.
Usage notes

In the US, the word “right” is used as an adverb meaning “very, quite” in most of the major dialect areas, including the Southern US, Appalachia, New England, and the Midwest, though the usage is not part of standard US English. In the UK also it is not part of the standard language but is regarded as stereotypical of the dialects of northern England, though it occurs in other dialects also.

Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:right.
Synonyms
  • (on the right side): rightward, rightwise
  • (towards the right side): rightward, rightways
  • (exactly, precisely): exactly, just, precisely, smack-dab; see also Thesaurus:exactly
  • (immediately, directly): right smack, slap-bang
  • (very, extremely): ever so; see also Thesaurus:very
  • (according to fact or truth): in point of fact, in truth; see also Thesaurus:actually
  • (correct manner): correctly, properly
Derived terms
  • right away
  • right now
  • right quick
  • right smart
Related terms
  • downright
  • upright
Translations

Interjection

right

  1. Yes, that is correct; I agree.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Tell her you’re here. — Right, thanks, Pete.

  2. I agree with whatever you say; I have no opinion.
  3. Signpost word to change the subject in a discussion or discourse.
    – After that interview, I don’t think we should hire her.
    Right — who wants lunch?
  4. Used to check agreement at the end of an utterance.
    You’re going, right?
  5. Used to add seriousness or decisiveness before a statement.
    • 1987, Withnail and I:
      Withnail: Right … I’m gonna do the washing up.
Translations
Derived terms
  • yeah right

Etymology 3

From Middle English right, righte, reght, reghte, riȝt, riȝte, from Old English riht, reht, ġeriht (that which is right, just, or proper; a right; due; law; canon; rule; direction; justice; equity; standard), from Proto-West Germanic *reht, from Proto-Germanic *rehtą (a right), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵtom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵt- (to straighten; direct). Cognate with Dutch recht (a right; privilege), German Recht (a right).

Noun

right (plural rights)

  1. That which complies with justice, law or reason.
  2. A legal, just or moral entitlement.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
      There are no rights whatever, without corresponding duties.
  3. The right side or direction.
  4. The right hand or fist.
  5. The authority to perform, publish, film, or televise a particular work, event, etc.; a copyright.
  6. (politics) The ensemble of right-wing political parties; political conservatives as a group.
  7. The outward or most finished surface, as of a coin, piece of cloth, a carpet, etc.
    Synonym: (of fabric) right side
  8. (surfing) A wave breaking from right to left (viewed from the shore).
    Antonym: left
Synonyms
  • (right side): starboard, 3 o’clock
Antonyms
  • (legal or moral entitlement): duty, obligation
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English righten, reghten, riȝten, from Old English rihtan, ġerihtan (to straighten, judge, set upright, set right), from Proto-West Germanic *rihtijan, from Proto-Germanic *rihtijaną (to straighten; rectify; judge).

Verb

right (third-person singular simple present rights, present participle righting, simple past and past participle righted)

  1. (transitive) To correct.
  2. (transitive) To set upright.
  3. (intransitive) To return to normal upright position.
  4. (transitive) To do justice to; to relieve from wrong; to restore rights to; to assert or regain the rights of.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, Richard III
      So just is God, to right the innocent.
    • 1776, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, Declaration of Independence
      All experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Derived terms
  • aright
  • beright
  • eright
  • unright
Translations

Further reading

  • right at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • right in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • girth, grith

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • reȝt, riȝte, riȝt, ryȝt, ryght, righte, riht

Etymology

From Old English riht.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rixt/, [riçt]
  • Rhymes: -ixt

Noun

right (plural rightes)

  1. A good deed, right action
  2. A just or equitable action
  3. A law, ruling, judgement or rule
  4. A right, entitlement or privilege
  5. Truth, correctness
  6. right (direction; as opposed to the left)

Descendants

  • English: right
    • Spanish: right
    • Welsh: reit
    • Northumbrian: reet
  • Scots: richt

References

  • “right, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-18.

Adjective

right (plural and weak singular righte, comparative rightre, superlative rightest)

  1. straight, not bent
  2. On the or at the right (as opposed to left)
  3. Morally correct or justified
  4. Legally correct or justified
  5. real, genuine, authentic, true
  6. natural, undisturbed

Related terms

  • rightful

Descendants

  • English: right
    • Spanish: right
    • Welsh: reit
  • Scots: richt
  • Yola: reicht, riaught

References

  • “right, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-18.

Spanish

Etymology

From English right fielder.

Noun

right m (plural rights)

  1. (baseball) right fielder

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