good vs sound what difference

what is difference between good and sound

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: go͝od, IPA(key): /ɡʊd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡʊd/, [ɡʊ̈d], [ɡɪ̈d]
  • (AAVE) enPR: go͝o(d), IPA(key): /ɡʊ(d)/
  • Rhymes: -ʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English good, from Old English gōd, from Proto-West Germanic *gōd, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ- (to unite, be associated, suit). Cognate with Russian го́дный (gódnyj, fit, well-suited, good for; (coll.) good), год (god), “year”, via “suitable time”. Not related to the word god.

Alternative forms

  • g’d (poetic contraction)
  • goode (obsolete)

Adjective

good (comparative better, superlative best)

  1. (of people)
    1. Acting in the interest of what is beneficial, ethical, or moral.
      • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
        It is not good to be alone, to walk here in this worthly wone.
      • 1500?, Evil Tonguesː
        If any man would begin his sins to reny, or any good people that frae vice deed rest ain. What so ever he were that to virtue would apply, But an ill tongue will all overthrow again.
      • 1891, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ch.6
        When we are happy, we are always good, but when we are good, we are not always happy.
    2. Competent or talented.
      • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
        And Marsha says I am a good cook!

    3. Able to be depended on for the discharge of obligations incurred; of unimpaired credit; used with for.
    4. Well-behaved (especially of children or animals).
    5. (US) Satisfied or at ease
    6. (archaic) Of high rank or birth.
  2. (of capabilities)
    1. Useful for a particular purpose; functional.
      • 1526, Herballː
        Against cough and scarceness of breath caused of cold take the drink that it hath been sodden in with Liquorice[,] or that the powder hath been sodden in with dry figs[,] for the same the electuary called dyacalamentum is good[,] and it is made thus.
    2. Effective.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    3. (obsolete) Real; actual; serious.
      • Love no man in good earnest.
  3. (properties and qualities)
    1. (of food)
      1. Edible; not stale or rotten.
      2. Having a particularly pleasant taste.
        • c. 1430 (reprinted 1888), Thomas Austin, ed., Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55 [Early English Text Society, Original Series; 91], London: N. Trübner & Co. for the Early English Text Society, volume I, OCLC 374760, page 11:
          Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke [] caste þher-to Safroun an Salt []
        • 1962 (quoting 1381 text), Hans Kurath & Sherman M. Kuhn, eds., Middle English Dictionary, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, ISBN 978-0-472-01044-8, page 1242:
          dorrẹ̅, dōrī adj. & n. [] cook. glazed with a yellow substance; pome(s ~, sopes ~. [] 1381 Pegge Cook. Recipes page 114: For to make Soupys dorry. Nym onyons [] Nym wyn [] toste wyte bred and do yt in dischis, and god Almande mylk.
      3. Being satisfying; meeting dietary requirements.
    2. Healthful.
    3. Pleasant; enjoyable.
    4. Favourable.
    5. Unblemished; honourable.
    6. Beneficial; worthwhile.
    7. Adequate; sufficient; not fallacious.
      • My reasons are both good and weighty.
  4. (colloquial, when with and) Very, extremely. See good and.
  5. Holy (especially when capitalized) .
  6. (of quantities)
    1. Reasonable in amount.
    2. Large in amount or size.
      • The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [].
    3. Full; entire; at least as much as.
Usage notes

The comparative gooder and superlative goodest are nonstandard.
In informal (often jocular) contexts, best may be inflected further and given the comparative bester and the superlative bestest; these forms are also nonstandard.

Synonyms
  • (having positive attributes): not bad, all right, satisfactory, decent, see also Thesaurus:good
  • (healthful): well
  • (competent or talented): accomplished
  • (acting in the interest of good; ethical): See Thesaurus:goodness
Antonyms
  • (having positive attributes): bad, poor
  • (ethical): bad, evil
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

good

  1. That is good; an elliptical exclamation of satisfaction or commendation.
    Good! I can leave now.

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English goode (good, well, adverb), from the adjective. Compare Dutch goed (good, well, adverb), German gut (good, well, adverb), Danish godt (good, well, adverb), Swedish godt (good, well, adverb), all from the adjective.

Adverb

good (comparative better, superlative best)

  1. (nonstandard) Well; satisfactorily or thoroughly.
    The boy done good. (did well)
    • 2007 April 19, Jimmy Wales, “Jimmy Wales on the User-Generated Generation”, Fresh Air, WHYY, Pennsylvania [1]
      The one thing that we can’t dois throw out the baby with the bathwater. We know our process works pretty darn good and, uh, it’s really sparked this amazing phenomenon of thishigh-quality website.
Derived terms
  • but good
  • a good many

Etymology 3

From Middle English good, god, from Old English gōd (a good thing, advantage, benefit, gift; good, goodness, welfare; virtue, ability, doughtiness; goods, property, wealth), from Proto-Germanic *gōdą (goods, belongings), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ-, *gʰodʰ- (to unite, be associated, suit). Compare German Gut (item of merchandise; estate; property).

Noun

good (countable and uncountable, plural goods)

  1. (uncountable) The forces or behaviours that are the enemy of evil. Usually consists of helping others and general benevolence.
    Antonyms: bad, evil
  2. (countable) A result that is positive in the view of the speaker.
    Antonym: bad
  3. (uncountable) The abstract instantiation of goodness; that which possesses desirable qualities, promotes success, welfare, or happiness, is serviceable, fit, excellent, kind, benevolent, etc.
    He is an influence for good on those girls.
    • There be many that say, Who will show us any good? Lord lift thou up the light of thy countenance upon us.
    • 1788, John Jay, The Federalist Papers No. 64:
      [] the government must be a weak one indeed, if it should forget that the good of the whole can only be promoted by advancing the good of each of the parts or members which compose the whole.
  4. (countable, usually in the plural) An item of merchandise.
    • Thy lands and goods / Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate / Unto the state of Venice.
Derived terms
  • (item of merchandise): capital goods, consumer goods
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English goden, godien, from Old English gōdian (to improve, get better; make better; endow, enrich), from Proto-West Germanic *gōdōn (to make better, improve), from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz (good, favourable).

Verb

good (third-person singular simple present goods, present participle gooding, simple past and past participle gooded)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To thrive; fatten; prosper; improve.
  2. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To make good; turn to good; improve.
  3. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To make improvements or repairs.
  4. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To benefit; gain.
  5. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To do good to (someone); benefit; cause to improve or gain.
  6. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To satisfy; indulge; gratify.
  7. (reflexive, now chiefly dialectal) To flatter; congratulate oneself; anticipate.
Derived terms
  • gooding

Etymology 5

From English dialectal, from Middle English *goden, of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish göda (to fatten, fertilise, battle), Danish gøde (to fertilise, battle), ultimately from the adjective. See above.

Verb

good (third-person singular simple present goods, present participle gooding, simple past and past participle gooded)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal, Scotland) To furnish with dung; manure; fatten with manure; fertilise.
    • April 5 1628, Bishop Joseph Hall, The Blessings, Sins, and Judgments of God’s Vineyard
      Nature was like itself , in it , in the world : God hath taken it in from the barren downs , and gooded it : his choice did not find , but make it thus
Derived terms
  • goodening

Further reading

  • good at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • good in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • good in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Dutch Low Saxon

Adjective

good

  1. good

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch goet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʝoː˦d], [ʝoː˦t]

Adjective

good (comparative baeter, superlative bès, predicative superlative ‘t ‘t bès)

  1. good

Inflection


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • god, gode, goed, gude

Etymology

From Old English gōd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡoːd/
  • Rhymes: -oːd

Adjective

good (plural and weak singular goode, comparative bettre, superlative best)

  1. good (of good quality or behaviour)
  2. good (morally right or righteous)
    • 14th c., Chaucer, General Prologue:
  3. advantageous, wealthy, profitable, useful
  4. large; of a great size or quantity
  5. Having a great degree or extent.

Descendants

  • English: good
  • Scots: guid
  • Yola: gooude, gayde

References

  • “gọ̄d, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.


English

Alternative forms

  • soune, sownd, sowne (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /saʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English sound, sund, isund, ȝesund, from Old English sund, ġesund (sound, safe, whole, uninjured, healthy, prosperous), from Proto-Germanic *gasundaz, *sundaz (healthy), from Proto-Indo-European *sunt-, *swent- (vigorous, active, healthy).

Cognate with Scots sound, soun (healthy, sound), Saterland Frisian suund, gesuund (healthy), West Frisian sûn (healthy), Dutch gezond (healthy, sound), Low German sund, gesund (healthy), German gesund (healthy, sound), Danish sund (healthy), Swedish sund (sound, healthy). Related also to Dutch gezwind (fast, quick), German geschwind (fast, quick), Old English swīþ (strong, mighty, powerful, active, severe, violent). See swith.

Adjective

sound (comparative sounder, superlative soundest)

  1. Healthy.
  2. Complete, solid, or secure.
  3. (mathematics, logic) Having the property of soundness.
    Hypernym: valid
  4. (Britain, slang) Good; acceptable; decent.
  5. (of sleep) Quiet and deep.
  6. Heavy; laid on with force.
  7. Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

sound (comparative more sound, superlative most sound)

  1. Soundly.

Interjection

sound

  1. (Britain, slang) Yes; used to show agreement or understanding, generally without much enthusiasm.

Etymology 2

  • Noun: from Middle English sownde, alteration of soun, borrowed from Anglo-Norman sun, soun, Old French son, from accusative of Latin sonus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swenh₂- (to sound, resound).
  • Verb: from Middle English sownden, sounen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman suner, sounder, Old French soner (modern sonner), from Latin sonō.
  • The hypercorrect -d appears in the fifteenth century.

Displaced native Middle English swei, from Old English swēġ, from Proto-Germanic *swōgiz.

Noun

sound (countable and uncountable, plural sounds)

  1. A sensation perceived by the ear caused by the vibration of air or some other medium.
  2. A vibration capable of causing such sensations.
    • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. []. He halted opposite the Privy Gardens, and, with his face turned skywards, listened until the sound of the Tower guns smote again on the ear and dispelled his doubts.
  3. (music) A distinctive style and sonority of a particular musician, orchestra etc
  4. Noise without meaning; empty noise.
  5. Earshot, distance within which a certain noise may be heard.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:sound
Descendants
  • Japanese: サウンド (saundo)
Translations
See also
  • audible

Verb

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) To produce a sound.
  2. (copulative) To convey an impression by one’s sound.
  3. (intransitive) To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To resound.
  5. (intransitive, law, often with in) To arise or to be recognizable as arising in or from a particular area of law, or as likely to result in a particular kind of legal remedy.
  6. (transitive) To cause to produce a sound.
  7. (transitive, phonetics, of a vowel or consonant) To pronounce.
Synonyms
  • (to make noise): echo, reecho, resonate
  • See also Thesaurus:sound
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English sound, sund, from Old English sund (the power, capacity, or act of swimming; swimming; sea; ocean; water; sound; strait; channel), from Proto-Germanic *sundą (swimming; sound), from Proto-Indo-European *swem- (swimming; sea). Cognate with Dutch sond (sound; strait), Danish sund (sound; strait; channel), Swedish sund (sound; strait; channel), Icelandic sund (sound; strait; channel). Related to swim.

Noun

sound (plural sounds)

  1. (geography) A long narrow inlet, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean.
    • The Sound of Denmarke, where ships pay toll.
  2. The air bladder of a fish.
  3. A cuttlefish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English sounden, from Old French sonder, from sonde (sounding line) of Germanic origin, compare Old English sundgyrd (a sounding rod), sundline (a sounding line), Old English sund (water, sea). More at Etymology 3 above.

Verb

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) Dive downwards, used of a whale.
  2. To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe.
    When I sounded him, he appeared to favor the proposed deal.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      I was in jest, / And by that offer meant to sound your breast.
    • I’ve sounded my Numidians man by man.
  3. Test; ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device.
  4. (medicine) To examine with the instrument called a sound or sonde, or by auscultation or percussion.
Translations

Noun

sound (plural sounds)

  1. A long, thin probe for sounding or dilating body cavities or canals such as the urethra; a sonde.
Translations

References

  • sound at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • sound in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • nodus, udons, undos

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English sound.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsawnd/

Noun

sound m (invariable)

  1. (music) sound (distinctive style and sonority)

References

Anagrams

  • snudo, snudò

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