goop vs scoop what difference

what is difference between goop and scoop

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Noun

goop (usually uncountable, plural goops)

  1. (informal, usually uncountable) A thick, slimy substance; goo.
  2. (countable, informal, derogatory, dated) A silly, stupid, or boorish person.

Derived terms

  • goopy

Verb

goop (third-person singular simple present goops, present participle gooping, simple past and past participle gooped)

  1. (informal) To apply a thick, slimy, or goo-like substance.
  2. (informal, possibly obsolete) To stare; gawk.

Translations

References

  • “goop” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.
  • Random House Webster’s Unabridged Electronic Dictionary, 1987–1996.

Anagrams

  • PoGo, pogo


English

Etymology

From Middle English scope, schoupe, a borrowing from Middle Dutch scoep, scuep, schope, schoepe (bucket for bailing water) and Middle Dutch schoppe, scoppe, schuppe (“a scoop, shovel”; > Modern Dutch schop (spade)), from Proto-Germanic *skuppǭ, *skuppijǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- (to cut, to scrape, to hack)..

Cognate with Old Frisian skuppe (shovel), Middle Low German schōpe (scoop, shovel), German Low German Schüppe, Schüpp (shovel), German Schüppe, Schippe (shovel, spade). Related to English shovel.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sko͞op, IPA(key): /skuːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Noun

scoop (plural scoops)

  1. Any cup- or bowl-shaped tool, usually with a handle, used to lift and move loose or soft solid material.
  2. The amount or volume of loose or solid material held by a particular scoop.
  3. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shovelling.
  4. A story or fact; especially, news learned and reported before anyone else.
  5. (automotive) An opening in a hood/bonnet or other body panel to admit air, usually for cooling the engine.
  6. The digging attachment on a front-end loader.
  7. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow.
    • 1819, Joseph Rodman Drake, The Culprit Fay
      Some had lain in the scoop of the rock.
  8. A spoon-shaped surgical instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.
  9. A special spinal board used by emergency medical service staff that divides laterally to scoop up patients.
  10. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop.
  11. (Scotland) The peak of a cap.
  12. (pinball) A hole on the playfield that catches a ball, but eventually returns it to play in one way or another.

Synonyms

  • (tool): scooper
  • (amount held by a scoop): scoopful

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

scoop (third-person singular simple present scoops, present participle scooping, simple past and past participle scooped)

  1. (transitive) To lift, move, or collect with a scoop or as though with a scoop.
  2. (transitive) To make hollow; to dig out.
  3. (transitive) To report on something, especially something worthy of a news article, before (someone else).
  4. (music, often with “up”) To begin a vocal note slightly below the target pitch and then to slide up to the target pitch, especially in country music.
  5. (slang) To pick (someone) up

Derived terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Co-ops, Coops, POCOs, co-ops, coops

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English scoop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skup/

Noun

scoop m (plural scoops)

  1. scoop (news learned and reported before anyone else)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English scoop. Compare scoprire (uncover), scoperta (discovery).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskup/

Noun

scoop m (invariable)

  1. scoop (news learned and reported before anyone else)

Anagrams

  • scopo, scopò

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