gore vs panel what difference

what is difference between gore and panel

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɡɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: gôr, IPA(key): /ɡɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: gōr, IPA(key): /ɡo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ɡoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English gore, gor, gorre (mud, muck), from Old English gor (dirt, dung, filth, muck), from Proto-Germanic *gurą (half-digested stomach contents; feces; manure), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (hot; warm).

Noun

gore (uncountable)

  1. Blood, especially that from a wound when thickened due to exposure to the air.
  2. Murder, bloodshed, violence.
  3. (obsolete except in dialects) Dirt; mud; filth.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Fisher to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • gory
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English goren, from gore (gore), ultimately from Old English gār (spear), itself from Proto-Germanic *gaizaz. Related to gar and gore (a projecting point).

Verb

gore (third-person singular simple present gores, present participle goring, simple past and past participle gored)

  1. (transitive, of an animal) To pierce with the horn.
    The bull gored the matador.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To pierce with anything pointed, such as a spear.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English gore (patch (of land, fabric), clothes), from Old English gāra, from Proto-Germanic *gaizô.

Noun

gore (plural gores)

  1. A triangular piece of land where roads meet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
  2. (surveying) A small piece of land left unincorporated due to competing surveys or a surveying error.
  3. The curved surface that lies between two close lines of longitude on a globe
  4. A triangular or rhomboid piece of fabric, especially one forming part of a three-dimensional surface such as a sail, skirt, hot-air balloon, etc.Wp
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  5. An elastic gusset for providing a snug fit in a shoe.
  6. A projecting point.
  7. (heraldry) One of the abatements, made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute angle in the fesse point.
Translations

Verb

gore (third-person singular simple present gores, present participle goring, simple past and past participle gored)

  1. To cut in a triangular form.
  2. To provide with a gore.
    to gore an apron

Anagrams

  • Geor., Gero, Ogre, Rego, ergo, ergo-, gero-, goer, ogre, orge, rego, roge

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

gore

  1. Inflected form of goor

Middle English

Etymology 1

Inherited from Old English gāra, from Proto-Germanic *gaizô.

Alternative forms

  • gare, goore, gour, gower

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɔːr(ə)/

Noun

gore (plural gores or goren)

  1. A triangle-shaped plot of land; a gore.
  2. A triangle-shaped piece or patch of fabric.
  3. A piece of clothing (especially a loose-fitting one, such as a coat or dress)
  4. (rare) A piece of armour; a mail coat.
  5. (rare) A triangle-shaped piece of armor.
Descendants
  • English: gore
  • Scots: gair
References
  • “gōre, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-26.

Etymology 2

Inherited from Old English gor, from Proto-Germanic *gurą.

Alternative forms

  • gorre, gor

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɔːr/

Noun

gore (uncountable)

  1. Muck, filth, dirt; that which causes dirtiness
  2. (figuratively) Iniquity, sinfulness.
  3. (rare) A despicable individual.
Descendants
  • English: gore
  • Scots: goor, gure
References
  • “gōre, n.(3).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-26.

Etymology 3

Inherited from Old English gār.

Noun

gore

  1. Alternative form of gare

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

Related to Persian جوراب(jôrâb).

Noun

gore ?

  1. sock
  2. stocking

Portuguese

Verb

gore

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of gorar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of gorar
  3. third-person singular imperative of gorar

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *gora; compare gora (hill).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡôre/
  • Hyphenation: go‧re

Adverb

gȍre (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре)

  1. up, above

Antonyms

  • dolje/dole

Noun

gȍre f (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре)

  1. genitive singular of gora
  2. nominative plural of gora
  3. accusative singular of gora
  4. vocative singular of gora

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡôreː/
  • Hyphenation: go‧re

Adverb

gȍrē (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре̄)

  1. worse

Shona

Etymology 1

Borrowed from a Khoe language; compare Khoekhoe kurib.

Noun

goré 5 (plural makoré 6)

  1. year

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

goré 5 (plural makoré 6)

  1. cloud


English

Etymology

From Middle English panel, from Old French panel, from Latin pannus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpænəl/
  • Rhymes: -ænəl

Noun

panel (plural panels)

  1. A (usually) rectangular section of a surface, or of a covering or of a wall, fence etc.
    1. (architecture) A sunken compartment with raised margins, moulded or otherwise, as in ceilings, wainscotings, etc.
  2. A group of people gathered to judge, interview, discuss etc. as on a television or radio broadcast for example.
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently reported that that rise is enough to melt 28 to 44 percent of glaciers worldwide.
  3. (comics) An individual frame or drawing in a comic.
  4. (graphical user interface) A type of GUI widget, such as a control panel.
  5. (law) A document containing the names of persons summoned as jurors by the sheriff
  6. (law) The whole jury
  7. (law, Scotland) A prisoner arraigned for trial at the bar of a criminal court.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  8. (obsolete) A piece of cloth serving as a saddle.
  9. A soft pad beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.
  10. (joinery) A board having its edges inserted in the groove of a surrounding frame.
  11. (masonry) One of the faces of a hewn stone.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gwilt to this entry?)
  12. (masonry) A slab or plank of wood used instead of a canvas for painting on.
  13. (mining) A heap of dressed ore.
  14. (mining) One of the districts divided by pillars of extra size, into which a mine is laid off in one system of extracting coal.
  15. (military, historical) A frame for carrying a mortar.
  16. (dressmaking) A plain strip or band, as of velvet or plush, placed at intervals lengthwise on the skirt of a dress, for ornament.
  17. A portion of a framed structure between adjacent posts or struts, as in a bridge truss.
  18. (Britain, historical) A list of doctors who could provide limited free healthcare prior to the introduction of the NHS.
  19. (medicine) A group of tests or assays, a battery.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • Panel in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Verb

panel (third-person singular simple present panels, present participle panelling or (US) paneling, simple past and past participle panelled or (US) paneled)

  1. (transitive) To fit with panels.

Anagrams

  • ‘plane, Alpen, Nepal, Palen, Plean, palen, penal, plane, plena

Czech

Noun

panel

  1. panel

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • panelový

Danish

Etymology

From Middle Low German panele (wall covering), and English panel (other senses)

Noun

panel n (singular definite panelet, plural indefinite paneler)

  1. panel (most senses, e.g. a wall panel, a panel of experts)

References

  • “panel” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English panel, itself borrowed from Old French panel. Doublet of panneau.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pa.nɛl/

Noun

panel m (plural panels)

  1. panel (group of people)

Further reading

  • “panel” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English panel.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɒnɛl]
  • Hyphenation: pa‧nel
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun

panel

  1. panel (a large, prefabricated part of a house, such as a wall, roof)
  2. panel (a prefabricated part of furniture)
  3. panel (instrument panel, such as a dashboard)
  4. panel (a group of people gathered to judge, interview, discuss etc. as on a television or radio broadcast for example)

Declension

or (less commonly)

Derived terms

  • panelelem
  • panelház
  • panellakás

References


Indonesian

Etymology

From English panel, from Middle English panel, from Old French panel, from Latin pannus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpanɛl]
  • Hyphenation: pa‧nèl

Noun 1

panel (plural panel-panel, first-person possessive panelku, second-person possessive panelmu, third-person possessive panelnya)

  1. panel:
    1. a (usually) rectangular section of a surface, or of a covering or of a wall, fence etc.
    2. (comics) an individual frame or drawing in a comic.
    3. a plain strip or band, as of velvet or plush, placed at intervals lengthwise on the skirt of a dress, for ornament.

Derived terms

Noun 2

panel (plural panel-panel, first-person possessive panelku, second-person possessive panelmu, third-person possessive panelnya)

  1. panel: a group of people gathered to judge, interview, discuss etc. as on a television or radio broadcast for example.

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading

  • “panel” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English panel.

Noun

panel m (invariable)

  1. panel (various groups of people)

Anagrams

  • Nepal

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • panell, panele, panyll, panelle

Etymology

From Old French panel, from pan, from Latin pannus; equivalent to pane +‎ -el (diminutive suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpanəl/, /panˈɛːl/

Noun

panel (plural panelles)

  1. A swatch or portion of textiles or cloth.
  2. A cushion or cloth acting as cushioning under a saddle.
  3. The people due to sit at a jury; a panel acting as jury
  4. (rare) A pane or slab of a transparent material.
  5. (rare) A portion or section.
  6. (rare) A hawk’s innards or digestive organs; the pannel.

Descendants

  • English: panel, pannel
  • Scots: panel

References

  • “panē̆l, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-05.
  • “panel, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-05.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German panele (wall covering), and English panel (other senses)

Noun

panel n (definite singular panelet, indefinite plural panel or paneler, definite plural panela or panelene)

  1. a panel (most senses, e.g. a wall panel, a panel of experts)

Derived terms

  • solcellepanel

References

  • “panel” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German panele (wall covering), and English panel (other senses)

Noun

panel n (definite singular panelet, indefinite plural panel, definite plural panela)

  1. a panel (most senses, e.g. a wall panel, a panel of experts)

Derived terms

  • solcellepanel

References

  • “panel” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English panel.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paˈnel/, [paˈnel]
  • Rhymes: -el

Noun

panel m (plural paneles)

  1. panel

Derived terms

  • panel solar

Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German panele (wall covering), and English panel (other senses)

Noun

panel c

  1. panel (most senses, e.g. a wall panel, a panel of experts)

Declension

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