gossip vs newsmonger what difference

what is difference between gossip and newsmonger

English

Etymology

From Middle English godsybbe, godsib (a close friend or relation, a confidant), from Old English godsibb (godparent, sponsor), equivalent to god +‎ sib.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡɒs.ɪp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑs.ɪp/
  • Hyphenation: gos‧sip

Noun

gossip (countable and uncountable, plural gossips)

  1. (countable) Someone who likes to talk about other people’s private or personal business.
    Synonyms: busybody, gossipmonger, meddler, rumormonger; see also Thesaurus:gossiper
  2. (uncountable) Idle talk about someone’s private or personal matters, especially someone not present.
    Synonyms: dirt, hearsay, rumor, scandal, scuttlebutt; see also Thesaurus:rumor
  3. (uncountable) Idle conversation in general.
    Synonyms: chat, chinwag, chit-chat, natter; see also Thesaurus:chatter
  4. (uncountable) A genre in contemporary media, usually focused on the personal affairs of celebrities.
    • Little disappointed, then, she turned attention to “Chat of the Social World,” gossip which exercised potent fascination upon the girl’s intelligence. She devoured with more avidity than she had her food those pretentiously phrased chronicles of the snobocracy [] distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
  5. (obsolete) A sponsor; a godfather or godmother; the godparent of one’s child.
    Synonym: sponsor
    Hyponyms: godfather, godmother
  6. (obsolete) A familiar acquaintance.
    Synonym: friend
  7. (obsolete) Title used with the name of one’s child’s godparent or of a friend.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gossip (third-person singular simple present gossips, present participle gossiping or gossipping, simple past and past participle gossiped or gossipped)

  1. (intransitive) To talk about someone else’s private or personal business, especially in a manner that spreads the information.
    Synonyms: blab, dish the dirt, spill the tea, talk out of turn, tell tales out of school
  2. (intransitive) To talk idly.
    Synonyms: chat, chatter, chew the fat, chinwag, natter, prattle, shoot the breeze
  3. (obsolete) To stand godfather to; to provide godparents for.
  4. (obsolete) To enjoy oneself during festivities, to make merry.

Translations

References

  • Michael Quinion (2004), “Gossip”, in Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, →ISBN.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English gossip.

Noun

gossip m (invariable)

  1. gossip (especially concerning famous or important people)
    Synonym: pettegolezzo

Derived terms

  • gossipparo


English

Etymology

From news +‎ monger.

Noun

newsmonger (plural newsmongers)

  1. A gossip.
  2. (colloquial) A journalist.
    • 2018, Linda Broday, The Cowboy Who Came Calling
      “Wait. I heard you have a story.”
      “News travels faster’n a herd of young cow ponies. Reckon you’d be the local newsmonger.”
      Charlie remained unfazed. “In the flesh. This ol’ nose can smell a headline a mile away.”

Related terms

  • gossipmonger, rumormonger, scandalmonger, monger and its derived terms

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