gossip vs visit what difference

what is difference between gossip and visit

English

Etymology

From Middle English godsybbe, godsib (a close friend or relation, a confidant), from Old English godsibb (godparent, sponsor), equivalent to god +‎ sib.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡɒs.ɪp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑs.ɪp/
  • Hyphenation: gos‧sip

Noun

gossip (countable and uncountable, plural gossips)

  1. (countable) Someone who likes to talk about other people’s private or personal business.
    Synonyms: busybody, gossipmonger, meddler, rumormonger; see also Thesaurus:gossiper
  2. (uncountable) Idle talk about someone’s private or personal matters, especially someone not present.
    Synonyms: dirt, hearsay, rumor, scandal, scuttlebutt; see also Thesaurus:rumor
  3. (uncountable) Idle conversation in general.
    Synonyms: chat, chinwag, chit-chat, natter; see also Thesaurus:chatter
  4. (uncountable) A genre in contemporary media, usually focused on the personal affairs of celebrities.
    • Little disappointed, then, she turned attention to “Chat of the Social World,” gossip which exercised potent fascination upon the girl’s intelligence. She devoured with more avidity than she had her food those pretentiously phrased chronicles of the snobocracy [] distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
  5. (obsolete) A sponsor; a godfather or godmother; the godparent of one’s child.
    Synonym: sponsor
    Hyponyms: godfather, godmother
  6. (obsolete) A familiar acquaintance.
    Synonym: friend
  7. (obsolete) Title used with the name of one’s child’s godparent or of a friend.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gossip (third-person singular simple present gossips, present participle gossiping or gossipping, simple past and past participle gossiped or gossipped)

  1. (intransitive) To talk about someone else’s private or personal business, especially in a manner that spreads the information.
    Synonyms: blab, dish the dirt, spill the tea, talk out of turn, tell tales out of school
  2. (intransitive) To talk idly.
    Synonyms: chat, chatter, chew the fat, chinwag, natter, prattle, shoot the breeze
  3. (obsolete) To stand godfather to; to provide godparents for.
  4. (obsolete) To enjoy oneself during festivities, to make merry.

Translations

References

  • Michael Quinion (2004), “Gossip”, in Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, →ISBN.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English gossip.

Noun

gossip m (invariable)

  1. gossip (especially concerning famous or important people)
    Synonym: pettegolezzo

Derived terms

  • gossipparo


English

Etymology

From Middle English visiten, from Old French visiter, from Latin vīsitō, frequentative of vīsō (behold, survey), from videō (see). Cognate with Old Saxon wīsōn (to visit, afflict), archaic German weisen (to visit, afflict).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪzɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzɪt
  • Hyphenation: vis‧it

Verb

visit (third-person singular simple present visits, present participle visiting, simple past and past participle visited)

  1. (transitive) To habitually go to (someone in distress, sickness etc.) to comfort them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 13th c.]
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To go and meet (a person) as an act of friendliness or sociability. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) Of God: to appear to (someone) to comfort, bless, or chastise or punish them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 13th c.]
    • [God] hath visited and redeemed his people.
    • Then she arose with her daughters in law, that she might return from the country of Moab: for she had heard in the country of Moab how that the Lord had visited his people in giving them bread.
  4. (transitive, now rare) To punish, to inflict harm upon (someone or something). [from 14th c.]
    • 1788, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, volume 68:
      Her life was spared by the clemency of the emperor, but he visited the pomp and treasures of her palace.
  5. (transitive) Of a sickness, misfortune etc.: to afflict (someone). [from 14th c.]
    • 1890, James George Frazer, The Golden Bough:
      There used to be a sharp contest as to where the effigy was to be made, for the people thought that the house from which it was carried forth would not be visited with death that year.
  6. (transitive) To inflict punishment, vengeance for (an offense) on or upon someone. [from 14th c.]
    • 2011, John Mullan, The Guardian, 2 Dec 2011:
      If this were an Ibsen play, we would be thinking of the sins of one generation being visited upon another, he said.
  7. (transitive) To go to (a shrine, temple etc.) for worship. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 14th c.]
  8. (transitive) To go to (a place) for pleasure, on an errand, etc. [from 15th c.]
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      Each year, millions of people visit the 4,570-meter-high Baishui Glacier in southern China.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (go and meet):: call on

Translations

Noun

visit (plural visits)

  1. A single act of visiting.
  2. (medicine, insurance) A meeting with a doctor at their surgery or the doctor’s at one’s home.

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

  • unvisited
  • visitation
  • visitor

Latin

Verb

vīsit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of vīsō
  2. third-person singular perfect active indicative of vīsō

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