gouge vs nick what difference

what is difference between gouge and nick

English

Etymology

From Middle English gouge (chisel with concave blade; gouge), from Old French gouge, goi (gouge), from Late Latin goia, gubia, gulbia (chisel; piercer), borrowed from Gaulish *gulbiā, from Proto-Celtic *gulbā, *gulbi, *gulbīnos (beak, bill). The English word is cognate with Italian gorbia, gubbia (ferrule), Old Breton golb, Old Irish gulba (beak), Portuguese goiva, Scottish Gaelic gilb (chisel), Spanish gubia (chisel, gouge), Welsh gylf (beak; pointed instrument), gylyf (sickle).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡaʊdʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡaʊdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd͡ʒ

Noun

gouge (countable and uncountable, plural gouges)

  1. Senses relating to cutting tools.
    1. A chisel with a curved blade for cutting or scooping channels, grooves, or holes in wood, stone, etc.
    2. A bookbinder’s tool with a curved face, used for blind tooling or gilding.
    3. An incising tool that cuts blanks or forms for envelopes, gloves, etc., from leather, paper, or other materials.
  2. A cut or groove, as left by a gouge or something sharp.
  3. (originally US, colloquial) An act of gouging.
  4. (slang) A cheat, a fraud; an imposition.
    Synonym: swindle
  5. (slang) An impostor.
  6. (mining) Soft material lying between the wall of a vein and the solid vein of ore.
  7. (US, military, slang, uncountable) Information.
    • 2005, Jay A. Stout, To Be a U.S. Naval Aviator (page 63)
      As all naval aviators have learned at one time or another in their careers, “There’s plenty of bad gouge out there,” and it has, does, and will get the unwary fliers in trouble.
    • 2013, Douglas Waller, Air Warriors: The Inside Story of the Making of a Navy Pilot (page 89)
      The Marines and “Coasties” (the nickname for Coast Guard students) were reputed to have good gouge on each class’s test. Rumor had it that the Marines had inside information on the questions for the next day’s FRR test, []

Derived terms

  • fault gouge
  • gouge bit

Translations

Verb

gouge (third-person singular simple present gouges, present participle gouging, simple past and past participle gouged)

  1. (transitive) To make a groove, hole, or mark in by scooping with or as if with a gouge.
    Synonyms: engrave, grave, incise
  2. (transitive) To cheat or impose upon; in particular, to charge an unfairly or unreasonably high price.
    Synonyms: defraud, swindle
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To dig or scoop (something) out with or as if with a gouge; in particular, to use a thumb to push or try to push the eye (of a person) out of its socket.
  4. (intransitive) To use a gouge.

Derived terms

  • gouger
  • gouging (noun)
  • price gouging
  • regouge

Translations

References

Further reading

  • chisel – gouge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gouge (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “gouge”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

French

Etymology

Old French gouge, from Latin gulbia (Late Latin gubia), of Gaulish or Basque origins.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuʒ/
  • Rhymes: -uʒ

Noun

gouge f (plural gouges)

  1. gouge (groove)
  2. gouge (tool)
  3. (obsolete) female servant
  4. (archaic) prostitute
    • 1857, Charles Baudelaire, Bribes – Damnation,
      On peut les comparer encore à cette auberge, / Espoir des affamés, où cognent sur le tard, / Blessés, brisés, jurant, priant qu’on les héberge, / L’écolier, le prélat, la gouge et le soudard.

      They can also be compared to this inn, / Hope to the starved, where in the night knock, / Injured, broken, cursing, begging to be lodged, / The schoolboy, the prelate, the prostitute and the soldier.

Verb

gouge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gouger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gouger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  5. second-person singular imperative of gouger

Further reading

  • “gouge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Etymology

From Late Latin gubia, from Latin gulbia.

Noun

gouge f (oblique plural gouges, nominative singular gouge, nominative plural gouges)

  1. gouge (tool)
  2. (chiefly derogatory) woman

Descendants

  • English: gouge
  • French: gouge

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (gouge, supplement)


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /nɪk/
  • Homophone: Nick
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Late Middle English nik (notch, tally; nock of an arrow). Its further etymology is unknown; a connection with nock (notch in a bow to hold the bowstring; notch at the rear of an arrow that fits the bowstring; cleft in the buttocks) has not been clearly established.

The verb appears to be derived from the noun, though the available evidence shows that some of the verb senses predate the noun senses. No connection with words in Germanic languages such as Danish nikke (to nod), Middle Dutch nicken (to bend; to bow) (modern Dutch knikken (to nod)), Middle Low German nicken (to bend over; to sink), Middle High German nicken (to bend; to depress) (modern German nicken (to nod)), Middle Low German knicken (to bend; to snap) (modern German knicken (to bend; to break), Old Frisian hnekka (to nod), and Swedish nicka (to nod), has been clearly established.

Noun

nick (plural nicks)

  1. A small cut in a surface.
    1. (now rare) A particular place or point considered as marked by a nick; the exact point or critical moment.
    2. (printing, dated) A notch cut crosswise in the shank of a type, to assist a compositor in placing it properly in the stick, and in distribution.
  2. Senses connoting something small.
    1. (cricket) A small deflection of the ball off the edge of the bat, often going to the wicket-keeper for a catch.
    2. (genetics) One of the single-stranded DNA segments produced during nick translation.
    3. (real tennis, squash (sport), racquetball) The point where the wall of the court meets the floor.
  3. (Britain, New Zealand, slang) Often in the expressions in bad nick and in good nick: condition, state.
  4. (Britain, law enforcement, slang) A police station or prison.
Derived terms
  • in the nick of time
Translations

Verb

nick (third-person singular simple present nicks, present participle nicking, simple past and past participle nicked)

  1. (transitive) To make a nick or notch in; to cut or scratch in a minor way.
    1. (transitive) To make ragged or uneven, as by cutting nicks or notches in; to deface, to mar.
    2. (transitive, rare) To make a crosscut or cuts on the underside of (the tail of a horse, in order to make the animal carry it higher).
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To fit into or suit, as by a correspondence of nicks; to tally with.
    1. (transitive) To hit at, or in, the nick; to touch rightly; to strike at the precise point or time.
    2. (transitive, cricket) To hit the ball with the edge of the bat and produce a fine deflection.
    3. (transitive, gaming) To throw or turn up (a number when playing dice); to hit upon.
  3. (transitive, mining) To make a cut at the side of the face.
  4. (transitive, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, slang) To steal.
  5. (transitive, Britain, law enforcement, slang) To arrest.
Derived terms
  • nicker
  • nicking (noun)
Translations

Etymology 2

From nick(name).

Noun

nick (plural nicks)

  1. (Internet) Clipping of nickname.

Verb

nick (third-person singular simple present nicks, present participle nicking, simple past and past participle nicked)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To give or call (someone) by a nickname; to style.

Etymology 3

A variant of nix or nixie.

Noun

nick (plural nicks)

  1. (archaic) A nix or nixie (water spirit).

References

Further reading

  • nick (DNA) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • nick (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • CKIN

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

nick

  1. singular imperative of nicken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of nicken

Kashubian

Pronoun

nick

  1. nothing

Polish

Etymology

From English nick(name).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ɲik//

Noun

nick m inan

  1. (Internet) nickname (familiar, invented given name)

Declension

Further reading

  • nick in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • nick in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

nick c

  1. nod (movement of the head to indicate agreement)
  2. header (in football)
Declension
Synonyms
  • (header):: nickning c
  • (nod):: nickning c
Derived terms
  • nickedocka
  • nicka
  • nicka till

Etymology 2

From the English nickname

Noun

nick n

  1. (slang) nick, nickname
Declension

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