gouge vs rout what difference

what is difference between gouge and rout

English

Etymology

From Middle English gouge (chisel with concave blade; gouge), from Old French gouge, goi (gouge), from Late Latin goia, gubia, gulbia (chisel; piercer), borrowed from Gaulish *gulbiā, from Proto-Celtic *gulbā, *gulbi, *gulbīnos (beak, bill). The English word is cognate with Italian gorbia, gubbia (ferrule), Old Breton golb, Old Irish gulba (beak), Portuguese goiva, Scottish Gaelic gilb (chisel), Spanish gubia (chisel, gouge), Welsh gylf (beak; pointed instrument), gylyf (sickle).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡaʊdʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡaʊdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd͡ʒ

Noun

gouge (countable and uncountable, plural gouges)

  1. Senses relating to cutting tools.
    1. A chisel with a curved blade for cutting or scooping channels, grooves, or holes in wood, stone, etc.
    2. A bookbinder’s tool with a curved face, used for blind tooling or gilding.
    3. An incising tool that cuts blanks or forms for envelopes, gloves, etc., from leather, paper, or other materials.
  2. A cut or groove, as left by a gouge or something sharp.
  3. (originally US, colloquial) An act of gouging.
  4. (slang) A cheat, a fraud; an imposition.
    Synonym: swindle
  5. (slang) An impostor.
  6. (mining) Soft material lying between the wall of a vein and the solid vein of ore.
  7. (US, military, slang, uncountable) Information.
    • 2005, Jay A. Stout, To Be a U.S. Naval Aviator (page 63)
      As all naval aviators have learned at one time or another in their careers, “There’s plenty of bad gouge out there,” and it has, does, and will get the unwary fliers in trouble.
    • 2013, Douglas Waller, Air Warriors: The Inside Story of the Making of a Navy Pilot (page 89)
      The Marines and “Coasties” (the nickname for Coast Guard students) were reputed to have good gouge on each class’s test. Rumor had it that the Marines had inside information on the questions for the next day’s FRR test, []

Derived terms

  • fault gouge
  • gouge bit

Translations

Verb

gouge (third-person singular simple present gouges, present participle gouging, simple past and past participle gouged)

  1. (transitive) To make a groove, hole, or mark in by scooping with or as if with a gouge.
    Synonyms: engrave, grave, incise
  2. (transitive) To cheat or impose upon; in particular, to charge an unfairly or unreasonably high price.
    Synonyms: defraud, swindle
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To dig or scoop (something) out with or as if with a gouge; in particular, to use a thumb to push or try to push the eye (of a person) out of its socket.
  4. (intransitive) To use a gouge.

Derived terms

  • gouger
  • gouging (noun)
  • price gouging
  • regouge

Translations

References

Further reading

  • chisel – gouge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gouge (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “gouge”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

French

Etymology

Old French gouge, from Latin gulbia (Late Latin gubia), of Gaulish or Basque origins.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuʒ/
  • Rhymes: -uʒ

Noun

gouge f (plural gouges)

  1. gouge (groove)
  2. gouge (tool)
  3. (obsolete) female servant
  4. (archaic) prostitute
    • 1857, Charles Baudelaire, Bribes – Damnation,
      On peut les comparer encore à cette auberge, / Espoir des affamés, où cognent sur le tard, / Blessés, brisés, jurant, priant qu’on les héberge, / L’écolier, le prélat, la gouge et le soudard.

      They can also be compared to this inn, / Hope to the starved, where in the night knock, / Injured, broken, cursing, begging to be lodged, / The schoolboy, the prelate, the prostitute and the soldier.

Verb

gouge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gouger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gouger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  5. second-person singular imperative of gouger

Further reading

  • “gouge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Etymology

From Late Latin gubia, from Latin gulbia.

Noun

gouge f (oblique plural gouges, nominative singular gouge, nominative plural gouges)

  1. gouge (tool)
  2. (chiefly derogatory) woman

Descendants

  • English: gouge
  • French: gouge

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (gouge, supplement)


English

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Middle English rout, route (group of people associated with one another, company; entourage, retinue; army; group of soldiers; group of pirates; large number of people, crowd; throng; group of disreputable people, mob; riot; group of animals; group of objects; proper condition or manner) [and other forms], from Anglo-Norman route, rute, Middle French rote, route, Old French rote, route, rute (group of people, company; group of armed people; group of criminals; group of cattle) (modern French route (obsolete)), from Latin rupta (compare Late Latin ruta, rutta (group of marauders; riot; unlawful assembly)), the feminine of ruptus (broken; burst, ruptured), the perfect passive participle of rumpō (to break, burst, rupture, tear; to force open; (figurative) to annul; to destroy; to interrupt), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *Hrewp- (to break; to tear (up)). The English word is a doublet of route.

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to assemble, congregate; of animals: to herd together; to regroup, make a stand against; to be riotous, to riot) [and other forms], from rout, route (noun); see above.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): [ɹʌʊt]
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Noun

rout (countable and uncountable, plural routs)

  1. (countable, obsolete) A group of people; a crowd, a throng, a troop; in particular (archaic), a group of people accompanying or travelling with someone.
    Synonyms: company, gathering
  2. (countable, archaic) A group of animals, especially one which is lively or unruly, or made up of wild animals such as wolves; a flock, a herd, a pack.
  3. (countable) A group of disorganized things.
  4. (countable) A group of (often violent) criminals or gangsters; such people as a class; (more generally) a disorderly and tumultuous crowd, a mob; hence (archaic, preceded by the), the common people as a group, the rabble.
  5. (countable, dated) A fashionable assembly; a large evening party, a soirée.
  6. (countable, archaic) A noisy disturbance; also, a disorderly argument or fight, a brawl; (uncountable) disturbance of the peace, commotion, tumult.
  7. (countable, law, historical) An illegal assembly of people; specifically, three or more people who have come together intending to do something illegal, and who have taken steps towards this, regarded as more serious than an unlawful assembly but not as serious as a riot; the act of assembling in this manner.
Derived terms
  • routous
  • routously
Translations

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company.

Etymology 2

The noun is derived from Middle French route (military defeat; retreat), from rout, archaic past participle of Middle French, Old French rompre (to break; to break up, disperse) (modern French rompre (to break, snap; to break up (with someone))), from Latin rumpere, the present active infinitive of rumpō (to break, burst, rupture, tear; to force open; (figurative) to annul; to destroy; to interrupt); see further at etymology 1.

The verb is derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): [ɹʌʊt]
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. (originally military) The act of completely defeating an army or other enemy force, causing it to retreat in a disorganized manner; (by extension) in politics, sport, etc.: a convincing defeat; a thrashing, a trouncing.
  2. (military, also figuratively) The retreat of an enemy force, etc., in this manner; also (archaic, rare), the army, enemy force, etc., so retreating.
Translations

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed) (originally military)

  1. (transitive) To completely defeat and force into disorderly retreat (an enemy force, opponent in sport, etc.).
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To retreat from a confrontation in disorder.

Translations

Etymology 3

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to snore; to grunt, snort; to sleep; to dwell; to settle permanently), [and other forms], from Old English hrūtan (to snore; to make a noise), from Proto-West Germanic *hrūtan (to snore), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to snore), from *hruttōną (to snore; to roar), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor-, *kr- (to croak, crow), *krut- (to snore; to roar), probably ultimately imitative. The English word is cognate with Icelandic rjóta, hrjóta (to snore; to rattle, roar), rauta (to roar), Middle Dutch ruyten (to make a noise; to chatter, chirp), Middle High German rūssen, rūzen (to make a noise; to buzz; to rattle; to snore), Norwegian Nynorsk ruta (to make a loud noise; to roar, rumble), Swedish ryta (to bellow, roar; to scream or shout angrily). Compare Old English rēotan, *hrēotan (to make a noise; to make a noise in grief, lament, wail; to shed tears, weep), from Proto-Germanic *reutaną; see further at etymology 4.

The noun is derived from the verb. It is cognate with Southern Norwegian rut (loud noise, din, roar).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): (verb sense 3, noun sense) /ɹʌʊt/, /ɹut/
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly England, regional) To snore, especially loudly.
  2. (intransitive, chiefly England, regional) To make a noise; to bellow, to roar, to snort.
  3. (intransitive, Scotland, archaic) Especially of the sea, thunder, wind, etc.: to make a loud roaring noise; to howl, to roar, to rumble.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • root (to cheer)
Translations

Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) A loud, resounding noise, especially one made by the sea, thunder, wind, etc.; a roar.
Translations

Etymology 4

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to cry out, bellow, roar) [and other forms], from Old Norse rauta (to roar), from Proto-Germanic *reutaną (to cry, wail), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *HrewdH- (to weep), probably imitative. The English word is cognate with Danish ryde (to low, moo), Latin rudere, rūdere (to bray; to cry), Lithuanian raudóti (to wail; to lament; to sob), Norwegian raute (to bellow; to low, moo), Old Church Slavonic рꙑдати (rydati, to wail, weep), Old High German riozan (to roar; to wail) (Middle High German riezen (to wail)), Old Norse rjóta (to roar), Old Swedish riuta, ryta (to howl, wail; to roar) (modern Swedish ruta, ryta (to howl; to roar) (regional)), Old Swedish röta (to bellow, roar) (modern Swedish rauta, råta, rota, röta (to bellow, roar) (regional)), Sanskrit रुद् (rud, to cry, wail, weep; to howl, roar; to bewail, deplore, lament).

The noun is derived from the verb, or from a noun derived from Old Norse rauta (to roar) (see above).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American, Ireland) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ɹʌʊt/, /ɹut/
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed) (chiefly Northern England, Northern Ireland, Scotland)

  1. (transitive) Of a person: to say or shout (something) loudly.
  2. (intransitive) Of a person: to speak loudly; to bellow, roar, to shout.
  3. (intransitive) Of an animal, especially cattle: to low or moo loudly; to bellow.
Translations

Noun

rout (plural routs) (chiefly Scotland)

  1. A lowing or mooing sound by an animal, especially cattle; a bellow, a moo.
  2. A loud shout; a bellow, a roar; also, an instance of loud and continued exclamation or shouting; a clamour, an outcry.
Translations

Etymology 5

A variant of wrout, itself a variant of wroot (to search or root in the ground) (obsolete), from Middle English wroten (to search or root in the ground; of a person: to dig earth; of a worm: to slither, wriggle; to corrode; of a worm: to irritate by biting the skin; to destroy (a fortification) by digging or mining) [and other forms] (whence root), from Old English wrōtan (to root up or rummage with the snout). from Proto-Germanic *wrōtaną (to dig with the nose or snout, to root); further etymology uncertain, perhaps related to Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds (a root).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) To dig or plough (earth or the ground); to till.
  2. (transitive) Usually followed by out or up: of a person: to search for and find (something); also (transitive) to completely empty or clear out (something).
  3. (transitive, chiefly US) Usually followed by from: to compel (someone) to leave a place; specifically (usually followed by out or up), to cause (someone) to get out of bed.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) Of an animal, especially a pig: to search (for something) in the ground with the snout; to root.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To use a gouge, router, or other tool to scoop out material (from a metallic, wooden, etc., surface), forming a groove or recess.
  6. (intransitive) Of a person: to search through belongings, a place, etc.; to rummage.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • router
Translations

Etymology 6

Possibly a variant of root (to dig or pull out by the roots; to abolish, exterminate, root out), from Middle English wroten; see further at etymology 5. Some recent uses are difficult to tell apart from rout (of an animal, especially a pig: to search (for something) in the ground with the snout; to search for and find (something)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) Usually followed by out or up: to dig or pull up (a plant) by the roots; to extirpate, to uproot.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) Usually followed by out: to find and eradicate (something harmful or undesirable); to root out.
Conjugation
Translations

Etymology 7

The verb is derived from Middle English routen (to move quickly, rush; of waters: to churn, surge; to drag, pull; to throw; to agitate, shake; to beat, strike;) [and other forms], from Old English hrūtan, from or cognate with Old Norse hrjóta (to be flung; to fall; to fly), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall; to fly; to move quickly); further etymology uncertain, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *kreu- (to fall, plunge; to rush; to topple). The English word is cognate with Middle High German rûzen (to move quickly, storm), and is also related to Old English hrēosan (to fall; to collapse; to rush).

The noun is derived from Middle English rout, route (a blow; suffering, woe (?); a jerk, sharp pull) [and other forms], from routen; see above.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹaʊt/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ɹʌʊt/, /ɹut/
  • Homophone: route (in some pronunciations)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Verb

rout (third-person singular simple present routs, present participle routing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, chiefly Scotland, archaic) To beat or strike (someone or something); to assail (someone or something) with blows.
Related terms
  • atrout

Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. (chiefly Scotland, archaic) A violent movement; a heavy or stunning blow or stroke.

Etymology 8

Origin uncertain; either imitative of the bird’s call, or possibly from Icelandic hrota (brant; brent goose), also probably imitative though perhaps influenced by hrot (a snore; act of snoring), from hrjóta (to snore), from Old Norse hrjóta (to snore), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną (to snore); see further at etymology 3.

Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) The brant or brent goose (Branta bernicla).
    Synonyms: brant goose, road-goose, rood goose, rot-goose

References

Further reading

  • rout (military) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • router (woodworking) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Tour, tour, trou

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • rot, ruat, ròt, röts

Etymology

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz. Cognate with German rot, Dutch rood, English red, West Frisian read, Danish rød.

Adjective

rout

  1. (Carcoforo) red

References

  • “rout” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German rōt, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reu̯t/, [ʀəʊ̯t]
  • Rhymes: -əʊt

Adjective

rout (masculine rouden, neuter rout, comparative méi rout, superlative am routsten)

  1. red

Declension

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

See also

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