gown vs robe what difference

what is difference between gown and robe

English

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman gune, goune (fur-trimmed coat, pelisse), from Old French goune, from Late Latin gunna (leather garment, a fur), from Ancient Greek γούνα (goúna, coarse garment), of unknown origin. Perhaps from a Balkan or Apennine language. Alternatively, perhaps from Scythian, from Proto-Iranian *gawnám (fur) (compare Younger Avestan ????????????????????(gaona, body hair) and Ossetian гъун (ǧun)).(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: goun, IPA(key): /ɡaʊn/
  • Rhymes: -aʊn

Noun

gown (plural gowns)

  1. A loose, flowing upper garment.
  2. A woman’s ordinary outer dress, such as a calico or silk gown.
  3. The official robe of certain professionals and scholars, such as university students and officers, barristers, judges, etc.
    1. The dress of civil officers, as opposed to military officers.
  4. (by metonymy) The university community.
    In the perennial town versus gown battles, townies win some violent battles, but the collegians are winning the war.
  5. A loose wrapper worn by gentlemen within doors; a dressing gown.
  6. Any sort of dress or garb.
  7. The robe worn by a surgeon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gown (third-person singular simple present gowns, present participle gowning, simple past and past participle gowned)

  1. To dress in a gown, to don or garb with a gown.

References

Anagrams

  • Wong, wong


English

Etymology

From Middle English robe, roobe, from Old French robe, robbe, reube (booty, spoils of war, robe, garment), from Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away), from Proto-Indo-European *Hrewp- (to tear, peel).

Akin to Old High German roup (booty) (Modern German Raub (robbery, spoils)), Old High German roubōn (to rob, steal) (Modern German rauben (to rob)), Old English rēaf (spoils, booty, dress, armour, robe, garment), Old English rēafian (to steal, deprive). Cognate with Spanish ropa (clothing, clothes). More at rob, reaf, reave.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹəʊb/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹoʊb/
  • Rhymes: -əʊb

Noun

robe (plural robes)

  1. A long loose outer garment, often signifying honorary stature.
  2. (US) The skin of an animal, especially the bison, dressed with the fur on, and used as a wrap.
  3. A wardrobe, especially one built into a bedroom.
  4. The largest and strongest tobacco leaves.

Derived terms

  • bathrobe

Descendants

  • Irish: róba
  • Scottish Gaelic: ròb

Translations

Verb

robe (third-person singular simple present robes, present participle robing, simple past and past participle robed)

  1. (transitive) To clothe; to dress.
  2. (intransitive) To put on official vestments.

Synonyms

  • (to clothe): dight, don, put on; see also Thesaurus:clothe

Derived terms

  • berobed

Anagrams

  • Bero, Boer, Ebor, Ebro, bore

Asturian

Verb

robe

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of robar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of robar

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrobɛ/
  • Rhymes: -obɛ
  • Hyphenation: ro‧be

Noun

robe m

  1. vocative singular of rob

Anagrams

  • bore, oreb

Dutch

Etymology

From French robe.

Pronunciation

Noun

robe f (plural roben or robes, diminutive robetje n)

  1. gown, robe

French

Etymology

Old French, from Proto-Germanic *raubō (booty), later “stolen clothing”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɔb/

Noun

robe f (plural robes)

  1. dress, frock
  2. fur, coat (of an animal)
    Ce cheval a une robe isabelle.
  3. wine’s colour

Derived terms

Hypernyms

  • habit
  • vêtement

Descendants

  • Dutch: robe
  • German: Robe
    • Czech: róba

See also

  • Les couleurs de la robe d’un cheval /The colors of horses’ hair/ : alezan, aubère, bai, blanc, crème, gris, isabelle, noir, palomino, pie, rouan, souris.

Further reading

  • “robe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • bore, orbe

Italian

Noun

robe f

  1. plural of roba

Anagrams

  • ebro, orbe

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • roobe, rob, robbe

Etymology

From Old French robe, from Frankish *rouba, *rauba, from Proto-West Germanic *raub, from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą. Doublet of reif.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɔːb(ə)/, /ˈrɔb(ə)/

Noun

robe (plural robes)

  1. robe (long loose garment):
    1. A robe as a symbol of rank or office.
    2. A robe as a spoil or booty of war; a robe given as a gift.
  2. (as a plural) The garments an individual is wearing.

Derived terms

  • roben
  • warderobe

Descendants

  • English: robe
    • Irish: róba
    • Scottish Gaelic: ròb
  • Scots: robe

References

  • “rō̆be, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-16.

Norman

Etymology

From Old French robe, robbe, reube (booty, spoils of war; robe, garment), from Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away), from Proto-Indo-European *reup- (to tear, peel).

Noun

robe f (plural robes)

  1. (Jersey) dress
    Synonym: fro
  2. (Jersey) robe

Old French

Alternative forms

  • robbe, reube

Etymology

From Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away).

Noun

robe f (oblique plural robes, nominative singular robe, nominative plural robes)

  1. booty; spoils (chiefly of war)
  2. piece of clothing
    • c. 1170,, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      [D]onez li [d]e voz robes que vos avez
      La mellor que vos i savez.

      Give her the clothes that you have
      The best that you know of.

Related terms

  • robeor
  • rober

Descendants

  • Middle French: robe
    • French: robe
      • Dutch: robe
      • German: Robe
        • Czech: róba
  • Norman: robe
  • Middle English: robe, roobe, rob, robbe
    • English: robe
      • Irish: róba
      • Scottish Gaelic: ròb
    • Scots: robe

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (robe)

Portuguese

Etymology

From French robe [de chambre].

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈʀɔ.b(ə)/
  • Hyphenation: ro‧be

Noun

robe m (plural robes)

  1. dressing gown
    Synonym: roupão

References


Spanish

Verb

robe

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of robar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of robar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of robar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of robar.

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